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When I work in the garage, I keep all the doors open. Is that okay? No. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ran a 5.5 horsepower gasoline-powered pressure washer in a double garage with both doors open, the window open, and a vent open. In only 12 minutes CO concentrations in the garage rose to 658 parts per million (ppm). The rate of emission from a typical gasoline engine is so large (30,000 to 100,000 ppm) that it is very difficult to provide sufficient ventilation. NIOSH warns, “Do not use equipment and tools powered by gasoline engines inside buildings…”

Do large buildings dilute carbon monoxide enough to eliminate the risk of CO poisoning? No. NIOSH investigated a case where a worker in a 48 x 88 x 14 foot room was poisoned by carbon monoxide. He was using an 8-horsepower pump and had fresh air entering the room through the forced-air heating system. Ten minutes after the pump engine was started. CO concentrations as high as 395 ppm were measured. In an Iowa case, an entire six- story hotel was filled with carbon monoxide from a single malfunctioning water heater located in the basement. Concentrations were as high as 600 ppm in a sixth-story room, a potentially lethal level.
« Last edited by username on April 16, 2018, 05:05:50 PM »

Author Topic: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?  (Read 1139 times)

Offline ExGingi

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Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« on: April 16, 2018, 03:00:31 PM »
DW read to me a story she received from a friend on WhatsApp about a couple that had high levels of CO in their apartment on a Friday night, and were saved by a CO detector they weren't even aware they had. The story ends off encouraging people to install CO detectors.

I insisted that a CO detector might be necessary only in small apartments, but in our large home with lots of open space, I don't see a risk of CO poisoning (except if someone would be spending much time in the boiler room, which is the only place I can imagine CO might accumulate).

Am I wrong?
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #2 on: April 16, 2018, 03:03:30 PM »
Youre probably wrong. Anyway, It's required by law in Lakewood NJ, and I would assume in most places

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #3 on: April 16, 2018, 03:06:17 PM »
Do you keep windows or doors open all the time ? Otherwise how would “lots of open space” help ?

Possible in kitchen as well. (Washer/dryer as well IINM.)
« Last Edit: April 16, 2018, 03:12:45 PM by TimT »

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #5 on: April 16, 2018, 03:45:44 PM »
It's required by NJ UCC (construction code)
FTFY
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Offline ExGingi

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #6 on: April 16, 2018, 04:56:37 PM »
Youre probably wrong. Anyway, It's required by law in Lakewood NJ, and I would assume in most places
Put that under the pros and cons of where you live.
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #7 on: April 16, 2018, 04:58:39 PM »
Do you keep windows or doors open all the time ? Otherwise how would “lots of open space” help ?

Possible in kitchen as well. (Washer/dryer as well IINM.)

Let's just say that at any given time, there's a strong likelihood of a window or door being open in my house.

I would be very interested to test my theory. How could I measure CO levels, rather than just get an alarm?
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #8 on: April 16, 2018, 05:05:32 PM »
Based on https://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/communications/CO/co1.html

Quote
If a home is vented properly and is free from appliance malfunctions, air pressure fluctuations or airway blockages, carbon monoxide will most likely be safely vented to the outside. But in today's "energy efficient" homes this is frequently not the case. Tightly constructed/sealed homes can trap CO-polluted air in a home year-round. Furnace heat exchangers can crack, vents can become blocked, inadequate air supply for combustion appliances can cause conditions known as backdrafting or reverse stacking, which force contaminated air back into the home. Exhaust fans on range hoods, clothes dryers and bathroom fans can also pull combustion products into the home.

I am guessing that my house is (probably unfortunately, as it's probably costing me more in energy) not currently at risk. Though I will try to experiment and measure levels at different times.
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #9 on: April 16, 2018, 05:07:03 PM »
Let's just say that at any given time, there's a strong likelihood of a window or door being open in my house.



I would be very interested to test my theory. How could I measure CO levels, rather than just get an alarm?



You can purchase a carbon monoxide tester to test levels in your house.
Meanwhile, I assume you will get one because- unless you literally can be sure there are always windows open why would you take the risk? Meanwhile, I don't know that windows open would help. AFAIK it wouldn't necessarily help.
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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #10 on: April 16, 2018, 05:07:36 PM »
Put that under the pros and cons of where you live.
I think that is pretty universal nowadays. It only applies to construction and landlords.
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #11 on: April 16, 2018, 05:08:38 PM »
DW read to me a story she received from a friend on WhatsApp about a couple that had high levels of CO in their apartment on a Friday night, and were saved by a CO detector they weren't even aware they had. The story ends off encouraging people to install CO detectors.

I insisted that a CO detector might be necessary only in small apartments, but in our large home with lots of open space, I don't see a risk of CO poisoning (except if someone would be spending much time in the boiler room, which is the only place I can imagine CO might accumulate).

Am I wrong?
WIKI added. You are wrong.
https://www.abe.iastate.edu/extension-and-outreach/carbon-monoxide-poisoning-ventilation-aen-209/
T h a n k s !

Offline username

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #12 on: April 16, 2018, 05:10:21 PM »
Based on https://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/communications/CO/co1.html

I am guessing that my house is (probably unfortunately, as it's probably costing me more in energy) not currently at risk. Though I will try to experiment and measure levels at different times.
Can “loose” houses produce CO problems? Yes. Besides the obvious problems with “loose” houses (they are hard to heat and cool, drafty, and uncomfortable) a “loose” house can lead to venting problems. When the holes in a “loose” house are located high on the house, for instance in the ceiling or on the second story, the air leaking out of the house must be replaced by air sucked into the house through the basement and lower levels. If enough air leaks out at the top of the house, the suction can pull air down the chimneys and vents, causing downdrafting and combustion gas spillage into the home.
T h a n k s !

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2018, 05:10:39 PM »
Based on https://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pages/communications/CO/co1.html

I am guessing that my house is (probably unfortunately, as it's probably costing me more in energy) not currently at risk. Though I will try to experiment and measure levels at different times.

How will you ensure that none of these ever happen?
Quote
free from appliance malfunctions, air pressure fluctuations or airway blockages,

You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.

Offline Sammy82

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #14 on: April 16, 2018, 05:10:41 PM »
Why not spend the $100 (each assuming each one is about $30 and you need detectors for the boiler, oven, and dryer) and be sure? Why in heavens name would you put your family at risk?