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When I work in the garage, I keep all the doors open. Is that okay? No. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ran a 5.5 horsepower gasoline-powered pressure washer in a double garage with both doors open, the window open, and a vent open. In only 12 minutes CO concentrations in the garage rose to 658 parts per million (ppm). The rate of emission from a typical gasoline engine is so large (30,000 to 100,000 ppm) that it is very difficult to provide sufficient ventilation. NIOSH warns, “Do not use equipment and tools powered by gasoline engines inside buildings…”

Do large buildings dilute carbon monoxide enough to eliminate the risk of CO poisoning? No. NIOSH investigated a case where a worker in a 48 x 88 x 14 foot room was poisoned by carbon monoxide. He was using an 8-horsepower pump and had fresh air entering the room through the forced-air heating system. Ten minutes after the pump engine was started. CO concentrations as high as 395 ppm were measured. In an Iowa case, an entire six- story hotel was filled with carbon monoxide from a single malfunctioning water heater located in the basement. Concentrations were as high as 600 ppm in a sixth-story room, a potentially lethal level.
« Last edited by username on April 16, 2018, 05:05:50 PM »

Author Topic: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?  (Read 1138 times)

Offline whYME

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #45 on: April 16, 2018, 10:30:00 PM »
Co is generated from combustible energy that doesn't burn well, in order for something to burn it needs oxygen, Fuel and heat. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_triangle
When the fire is lacking any of the three it will produce unburned gases known as co
I don't believe that's exactly correct, but you are right that a fire without enough oxygen will produce CO

Another solution to minimize co is have a plant in your house since that's their food and release oxygen, problem is the faster the plant grows the more co it consumes, in order for the tree to make a signifcant difference you'd nedd a plant that grows very quick it will outgrow your house very quickly.
That would be CO2

Offline skyguy918

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #46 on: April 16, 2018, 10:42:42 PM »
I don't believe that's exactly correct, but you are right that a fire without enough oxygen will produce CO
That would be CO2
There are many plants that filter CO as well.

Offline ckmk47

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #47 on: April 16, 2018, 10:57:33 PM »
Thanks for this thread.
I needed this kick in the pants.

My CO detector needed changing, so I took the old one away, but haven't replaced it yet.

Offline Definitions

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #48 on: April 16, 2018, 11:10:43 PM »
Does anybody else get headaches (not exactly headaches more of a flu type of feeling) when the fires are on over a yom tov in their house after a day or two?

Offline ExGingi

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #49 on: April 16, 2018, 11:21:01 PM »
So from what I gather from the responses here, the prudent thing to do would be to install a CO detector in sleeping areas. And possibly periodically measure levels where hazard exists, such as near furnace, clothes dryer and stoves, to detect any malfunction?

Can anyone chime in with actual (NYC) building code requirements.
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
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Offline ExGingi

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #50 on: April 16, 2018, 11:23:21 PM »
Thanks for this thread.
I needed this kick in the pants.

My CO detector needed changing, so I took the old one away, but haven't replaced it yet.
That's what likes are for.  ;D
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

Offline yesitsme

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #51 on: April 16, 2018, 11:24:30 PM »
Quote
Ask 3 engineers to solve a problem and you’ll get four different solutions.

Online TimT

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #52 on: April 16, 2018, 11:27:47 PM »
Can anyone chime in with actual (NYC) building code requirements.
I recall somebody mentioning that a HUD or Sec. 8 inspector told him to remove the detector from the kitchen & hang it up by the bedrooms. I don’t know if that’s a rule from the city or 1 of those agencies.

Offline Tuna Baygel

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #53 on: April 16, 2018, 11:34:16 PM »
Youre probably wrong. Anyway, It's required by law in Lakewood NJ, and I would assume in most places
There’s law in Lakewood NJ?

Offline ExGingi

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #54 on: April 16, 2018, 11:42:27 PM »
There’s law in Lakewood NJ?
Aren't Tuna Baygels in charge of enforcement?
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Offline David R

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #55 on: April 17, 2018, 02:52:19 AM »
So from what I gather from the responses here, the prudent thing to do would be to install a CO detector in sleeping areas. And possibly periodically measure levels where hazard exists, such as near furnace, clothes dryer and stoves, to detect any malfunction?

Can anyone chime in with actual (NYC) building code requirements.
Some detector models have a digital display that will show you the CO level.

Online aygart

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #56 on: April 17, 2018, 08:07:03 AM »
There’s law in Lakewood NJ?
Law= what they can be sued for if they don't enforce
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.

Online aygart

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #57 on: April 17, 2018, 08:36:06 AM »
So from what I gather from the responses here, the prudent thing to do would be to install a CO detector in sleeping areas. And possibly periodically measure levels where hazard exists, such as near furnace, clothes dryer and stoves, to detect any malfunction?

Can anyone chime in with actual (NYC) building code requirements.
NJUCC requires CO detectors in the hallways outside bedrooms. My understanding is that they should not be in the immediate areas of appliances since normal fluctuations in these areas can set them off. Even though code allows the CO detectors to be combination with smokes on the ceiling the best place for them is really lower down since CO is heavier than air.
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.

Offline skyguy918

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #58 on: April 17, 2018, 10:36:39 AM »
NJUCC requires CO detectors in the hallways outside bedrooms. My understanding is that they should not be in the immediate areas of appliances since normal fluctuations in these areas can set them off. Even though code allows the CO detectors to be combination with smokes on the ceiling the best place for them is really lower down since CO is heavier than air.
-1 on the whole last sentence.

ETA: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/21536403/

I specifically looked into this before buying combos.
« Last Edit: April 17, 2018, 10:40:05 AM by skyguy918 »

Online aygart

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Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #59 on: April 17, 2018, 10:48:31 AM »
-1 on the whole last sentence.

ETA: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/21536403/

I specifically looked into this before buying combos.
You are right about the - but I would put it at -.5 and give a -.5 back to you. The below makes sense even according to the link you posted. Although the issue they mention FWIU is more of an issue at corners than in the center where there would be more circulation.

https://www.lincolncounty.org/DocumentCenter/View/7767

Getting the Height Right
You must ensure you get your carbon monoxide detector installation height right. While some guides might recommend placing your detectors on the ceiling, we don't agree.
carbon monoxide detector attached to an exposed beam
The specific gravity of Carbon Monoxide is 0.9657 (with normal air being 1.0), this means that it will float up towards the ceiling because it is lighter than regular air. However, when a buildup of dangerous levels of CO gas is taking place, this is nearly always due to a heat source that is not burning its fuel correctly (motor vehicle exhaust fumes are an exception). This heated air can form a layer near your ceiling which can prevent the Carbon Monoxide from reaching a ceiling detector.
For this reason we suggest that it is best to mount your detectors on the walls at least a couple of feet below the height of the ceiling. If your detector has a digital read-out, then we recommend placing it at about eye level so you can easily read it. Or if you have some other structure, like the exposed beam in this photograph which is positioned below the ceiling level, then you can attach your carbon monoxide detectors to it instead.
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.