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DansDeals Forum => Tech Talk => Topic started by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2013, 01:24:23 AM

Title: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2013, 01:24:23 AM
Amazing pics!
I wish I knew how to take better pics.
Umm...can I get a photography class from you?
Wow.

I've been getting the impression around here lately that there are a great many people here (not just Dan ;)) who would love to get more into photography. In every trip report, half the comments on the pictures is someone wishing that they could take pictures like that, that they could maximize their camera's potential.

For a long time I've wanted to start a thread on learning photography, starting from the very basics and progressing to more and more advanced topics. I've made a rough outline (see below) of what I would like to cover.

I'm thinking this could even be more than just a simple how-to. Have a question about a certain technique? Always wanted to get a certain 'look' in a photograph and don't know how? Want to know why all your indoor pictures are blurry :)? I'd be more then happy to give you my $.02. Hopefully other DDF'ers who are knowledgeable about photography could chime in as well..

This is probably gonna be a lot of work from my end, so I don't want to do it if there's not much interest. If you think this is something you'd enjoy please let me know by posting here.

Here's a rough outline of what I'd like to cover. If anyone has any ideas/recommendations/requests please let me know.

______________

Choosing a camera
Point and shoot vs. mirrorless vs. DSLR
Camera specs and what they mean
Which specs to focus on and which to ignore
Balance between needs/price/convenience

Lenses 101 - technology, terminology, and specs, zooms vs. primes, basic/advanced/unique lenses

Lighting 101 - focusing specifically on easy to afford and easy to use setups
Small flash - on camera, off camera, modifiers and accessories
Studio strobes
Continuous lighting - fluorescent, LED, and halogen
Basic light modifiers - umbrellas, softboxes, gels, reflectors
Basic supports - lightstands, umbrella brackets, backgrounds, etc.

All about accessories - memory cards, tripods, bags, filters, remotes, adapters, grips, geotaggers, and more)


So I bought all my stuff - now what?

What makes a compelling photograph?
Exposure basics - the shutter speed/aperture/ISO triangle
Depth of field
Composition basics - rule of thirds, perspective, framing
Advanced composition - negative space, inclusion and exclusion, compression
Light - natural, golden hour, basic flash usage.

Let's start shooting...

Kids:
In the park
Playing sports
At home

Landscapes and wildlife:
"Grand" landscapes
"Intimate" landscapes
Seascapes
Waterfalls
Cityscapes
Wildlife
Birds in flight
Shooting in bad weather

Portraits:
Babies and newborns
Single person - indoors
Single person - outdoors
Families/siblings/groups
Natural light
Artificial light - simple
Artificial light - complex
Mixed light

Others:
Close up and macro
Product photography

How do I...? (Some specific scenarios/techniques - Basic)
Shoot out of a plane window?
Shoot underwater?
Shoot compelling black-and-white?

How do I...? (Some specific scenarios/techniques - Advanced)
HDR
Long exposures
Light painting
Twilight landscapes
Milky Way
Star trails

Basic editing concepts:
Exposure
Contrast
Clarity/sharpening
Color
Layers and masking
______________

So... what do you think?

(A quick note on my photographic "record" and where I'm coming from:: I was a salesperson and later trainer in one of the biggest photo stores in the US, and trained salespeople in all topics I hope to cover. I currently work as a product developer for a large manufacturer, where I design and develop photo and lighting equipment and accessories. You could see a small selection of my photography on my Flickr page - click the little globe under my user name to get there.)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on April 29, 2013, 02:07:39 AM
Thank you so much, myself and many others will certainly appreciate it!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chff on April 29, 2013, 02:17:26 AM
And on programs like PhotoShop etc.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Twin on April 29, 2013, 02:26:47 AM
This would be great if you would be so kind and give up some of your valuable time.
 
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: popcorn1508 on April 29, 2013, 02:48:03 AM
This would be great if you would be so kind and give up some of your valuable time.
 
+1
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on April 29, 2013, 08:35:17 AM
Great idea.
I would be happy to contribute as well.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Shreknit on April 29, 2013, 08:44:59 AM

For people in New York B and H photo offer alot of free photography and photo editing classes in there 9th ave location. They bring in alot of big guys to teach.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2013, 08:51:52 AM
For people in New York B and H photo offer alot of free photography and photo editing classes in there 9th ave location. They bring in alot of big guys to teach.

 :D :D :D
I agree, they're great classes. Especially since some of them (such as the introduction to lighting ones) were co-developed by me ;).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on April 29, 2013, 08:56:36 AM
:D :D :D
I agree, they're great classes. Especially since some of them (such as the introduction to lighting ones) were co-developed by me ;).
;)
You have quite the extensive curriculum.  :) What do you think about starting with the compositional elements and basic rules of photography first?
Most people just want to learn how to take better photos. Teaching them the basic rules of photography will be the quickest way to get them there and is applicable no matter what camera they are using.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Shreknit on April 29, 2013, 08:59:51 AM
:D :D :D
I agree, they're great classes. Especially since some of them (such as the introduction to lighting ones) were co-developed by me ;).

Nice are you working with gradus now?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on April 29, 2013, 08:59:52 AM
Wow! I would love to learn all these things. Its awfully kind of you to volunteer like this!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Moshe123 on April 29, 2013, 09:08:10 AM
Wow. You are amazing!

I would also start with the basic basics and go more advanced from there.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Marco Polo on April 29, 2013, 09:10:02 AM
Would love to start learning this.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yossi4k on April 29, 2013, 09:19:56 AM
Been dying to learn this stuff! Please share!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2013, 09:26:01 AM
What do you think about starting with the compositional elements and basic rules of photography first?
Most people just want to learn how to take better photos. Teaching them the basic rules of photography will be the quickest way to get them there and is applicable no matter what camera they are using.
I would also start with the basic basics and go more advanced from there.

I was actually thinking of doing it that way,  looks like people would find that more useful.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2013, 09:26:30 AM
Nice are you working with gradus now?

Ta-da!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on April 29, 2013, 10:11:22 AM
Would love to start learning this.
Been dying to learn this stuff! Please share!
Wow! I would love to learn all these things. Its awfully kind of you to volunteer like this!
This would be great if you would be so kind and give up some of your valuable time.
 
+4
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on April 29, 2013, 10:54:16 AM
+4
+1
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on April 29, 2013, 11:04:57 AM
This is great! Thanks for taking the initiative on this! I know I'm definitely interested. I'd love to know what is possible to do with a point and shoot like my Elph300 and what I would need a DSLR or manual setting camera for.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on April 29, 2013, 11:07:43 AM
This is great! Thanks for taking the initiative on this! I know I'm definitely interested. I'd love to know what is possible to do with a point and shoot like my Elph300 and what I would need a DSLR or manual setting camera for.

I think this should be part of the beginners course. Learning how to use your point and shoot.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SavingsBigtime on April 29, 2013, 11:10:02 AM
looking forward, this is something i really want to learn about , thanks in advance
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Moshe123 on April 29, 2013, 11:11:03 AM
I think this should be part of the beginners course. Learning how to use your point and shoot.

Or using the features in my simple camera, other than zoom....  ::)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on April 29, 2013, 11:11:40 AM
Or using the features in my simple camera, other than zoom....  ::)

Point and shoots are simple cameras. ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lfas25 on April 29, 2013, 02:09:33 PM
This would be amazing, can't wait for you to start / continue...
Your flickr pictures are amazing!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Tzadik Nistar on April 30, 2013, 07:15:28 PM
when r the classes starting? cant wait!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Frugalisntcheap on May 01, 2013, 12:31:18 AM
This sounds really exciting.  :D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 01, 2013, 12:46:09 AM
Thanks everyone for the positive feedback, I see that there's definitely an interest in this :D.

Based on some of the recommendations here I decided to start with the basics of photography, not cameras, since most people have a camera - they just want to know how to use it better. However, I kept on running into situations where in order to explain a concept or idea I find myself having to explain 'how' and 'why' this particular technique etc. works. So instead of repeating myself over and over again to bring out a point, I decided to go with the original plan and start with the very basics - how a P&S differs from a DSLR, what the specs mean and how the technology works, etc. Once we have that foundation in place I think everything will make more sense. I will however try to keep it short and sweet so that we could get to the meat as soon as possible  ;).

Look for the first lesson or two in the next 2-3 days.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 01, 2013, 12:57:23 AM
I've also added a wiki to serve as a Table of Contents. I'll convert each line to a link as we go along.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Moshe123 on May 01, 2013, 01:02:03 AM
I've also added a wiki to serve as a Table of Contents. I'll convert each line to a link as we go along.

Awesome.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on May 01, 2013, 08:48:07 AM
I've also added a wiki to serve as a Table of Contents. I'll convert each line to a link as we go along.
Great idea.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: MEIR613 on May 01, 2013, 08:58:53 AM
WOW!!! OP you are really nice giving up your time for this.

I'll be looking forward.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on May 01, 2013, 12:20:03 PM
WOW!!! OP you are really nice giving up your time for this.

I'll be looking forward.
+1
Sounds really cool!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ShmuliT on May 03, 2013, 12:28:45 AM
Already have some what of a knowledge of taking pics, but always excited to learn more.

Not sure if you mentioned how you plan on giving over all this wonderful info? Are you just going to write posts in this thread? Are you going to write up tutorials with pics and examples and link it here? create a youtube channel?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 04:32:13 AM
Already have some what of a knowledge of taking pics, but always excited to learn more.

Not sure if you mentioned how you plan on giving over all this wonderful info? Are you just going to write posts in this thread? Are you going to write up tutorials with pics and examples and link it here? create a youtube channel?

Everything is going to be posted in this tread, with pictures and videos embedded as needed.

In the end I decided on the following format: The basics of cameras and lenses (types and specs), the basics of photography (exposure, composition, etc.), then doubling back to advanced technological stuff and onward to more advanced photography. This way I think we could get to the 'how' of photography quickly, but only once we've had a little background on the 'why'. It'll make my life much easier ;).

I'll also try to include a short summary at the end of every class for quick reference.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 04:35:38 AM
Lesson 1.

Choosing a camera: Point and Shoot vs. Mirrorless vs. DSLR

Before you even start thinking which camera model to buy, you have to decide something much more important: the type of camera. There are three main types of cameras on the market today, and they each offer some things the others don't. Let's take a quick at them and see what the differences are and why you might choose one over the other.

Point & Shoots (P&S): These are by far the most popular cameras out there. Usually extremely compact, they're all easy to use, relatively cheap, and deliver great images. The point & shoot ranges from tiny shirt-pocket cameras such as the Canon Elph series (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/838762-REG/Canon_110_S_Powershot_ELPH_110_HS.html), to large superzooms (sometimes called all-in-ones or bridge cameras) such as the Panasonic FZ series (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/880981-REG/Panasonic_dmc_fz60k_Lumix_FZ60B_Digital_Camera.html), to 'advanced' P&Ss like the Canon G series (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/889961-REG/Canon_PowerShot_G15_Digital_Camera.html) or the $2800(!) Sony RX-1 (http://[http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/891105-REG/Sony_dscrx1_DSC_RX1_Full_Frame_Point.html). All P&Ss have fixed (non-removable) lenses.

Point & Shoot pros:
--- Amazing selection: At the time of this writing, B&H has 328 cameras in stock listed under Point & Shoot. A basic Canon Elph-style camera usually has a 3-8x zoom lens, a 3" screen, 1080p video, image stabilization, and a million other features. Should you could choose a superzoom, you'd get a 24-50x zoom, manual controls, a viewfinder, and (usually) a hotshoe for flashes. Advanced P&Ss will give you even more control, better, larger sensors, and higher quality lenses. Want a camera your baby could drop into a bowl of cereal? There are currently 18 different shock and waterproof cameras available (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?ipp=100&Ns=p_PRODUCT_SHORT_DESCR|0&ci=8612&N=4288586279+35+4052359761&srtclk=sort). Want a screen that swivels? Built-in GPS? WiFi? Check (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?atclk=Features_Vari-Angle+LCD&ci=8612&N=4288586279+35+4048356959), check (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?atclk=Features_GPS&ci=8612&N=4288586279+35+4289250260), and check (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?atclk=Features_Wi-Fi&ci=8612&N=4288586279+35+4056039657). One screen not enough, you want two of 'em? Check (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?atclk=Features_Dual+LCDs&ci=8612&N=4288586279+35+4291089199)!
--- Cheap: Even a $100 P&S will give you better pictures than a $500 camera from 5 years ago. You do not need to spend a fortune to get amazing pictures.
--- Light and easy to carry: No excuses for not shlepping the camera. If fits into your shirt pocket, a purse, just about anywhere.
--- Great video: Most current cameras are capable of recording 1080p HD video, or at least 720p. Combined with ubiquitous image stabilization P&Ss are capable of outputting awesome video.
--- Easy to use: Most P&S will only have an Auto or P mode, although some advanced or superzoom models will have full manual control. In Auto mode all you have to do is press the button. Some cameras even have an 'intelligent' auto feature where it could detect if you're shooting a flower, a portrait, etc. and adjust itself accordingly. This actually works pretty well on most cameras. In P mode you get a bit more control (you could turn the flash off, adjust the picture brighter or darker, etc.), but the camera still handles most of the decisions making for you.

Point & Shoot Cons:
--- Image quality relative to mirrorless and DSLRs: Yes, P&Ss will give you great picture quality - when situations are ideal. But if you plan to be shooting a lot in darker situations (indoors, your kids' school play) you will notice a considerable difference in quality compared to the other two. Sharpness will also not be as good as the others - the combination of a small physical lens, a small sensor, and over-zealous noise reduction (more on all of these later) is not a recipe for razor-sharp photos. These factors will be much less of an issue with advanced cameras such as the Canon G15, although a mirrorless or DSLR will still be far better.
--- Hard or impossible to achieve certain effects: You know that portrait look where the entire background is just blurred into creamy nothingness? That's one of the hardest things to create with a P&S (and conversely one of the easiest things to do with an SLR/mirrorless). Later on I'll show you some techniques to force this effect out of a P&S (to a degree), but the physics are simply not in your favor.
--- Speed: Compared to a DSLR, the P&S is practically a turtle. It takes a few seconds to turn on, zooming takes time, every setting change takes time. Most importantly though, is the speed at which the camera takes the picture. While a DSLR focuses almost instantly, a P&S could take a second or two. Once the image is in focus, there is a maddening delay called shutter lag, which is the time between you pressing the shutter button and the camera actually taking the picture. Between focusing and shutter lag, it could sometimes take 3 or more seconds to get your shoot, at which point the moment may be long gone. Later on we'll discuss some techniques for speeding this process up, but it'll still take far longer than a DSLR.
--- Not much control: The flip side to the P&S's ease of use it its lack of control. Want to lower your flash power so that people don't have that 'deer in headlights' look? Tough noogies. Want to change your aperture? Your shutter speed? Ain't happenin'. Of course some cameras do let you change all that, but a) they're in the minority by far, and b) since these are secondary features, you'll probably have to dig through 6 menu pages every time you want to make a change.
--- Limited expandability: A P&S is a closed system. Want a longer or wider lens? Want to use filters? No dice on most cameras. This is also a big issue if you ever want to dabble in lighting - it'll be quite difficult with a P&S.
____________

DSLRs: The big, black, "professional" looking cameras. Big, heavy, and (relatively) expensive, these have interchangeable lenses and optical viewfinders. The big players are Canon and Nikon, with Sony and Pentax having a small but dedicated market share. A typical 'starter' DSLR will have a 18 (Canon) or 24 (Nikon) megapixel sensor, come with an 18-55mm lens, and have actual buttons for only the most important tasks. As you move up through the lineup, you'll get more direct buttons and knobs, status LCDs, better focusing/metering systems, more lens support, metal or magnesium bodies, weather sealing, wireless flash control, higher frame-per-second rates, and more. You also get better kit lenses (that's the lens that comes with the camera) as you move up, and at a certain level (usually the third camera in the lineup) you'll also be able to buy the camera body by itself without any lens.

DSLR pros:
--- Image quality: This is the number one benefit of the DSLR - even the cheapest camera and lens combination will give you better pictures that any point and shoot, even if the P&S costs much more. (B&H currently lists (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ns=p_PRICE_2|0&ci=6222&N=4288586280&srtclk=sort&mnp=400&mxp=475) 3 DSLR kits (camera and lens) for $450 - that's cheaper than some P&Ss.) Looking at pictures of a P&S and a DSLR side by side, you'll be blown away by the difference in sharpness, color, and dynamic range (explained later) of the DSLR. When it comes to low light, there's no contest; the DSLR wins hand down.
--- Control: In a DLSR you have control over every single shooting parameter. There are no limits to what you could create; everything's at your beck and call. Flash power, exposure, color, and most importantly, RAW shooting. (I'll get into far more detail on that last thing later.)
--- Special effects: Out of focus backgrounds? Easy peasy. Long exposures? Timelapse? You bet.
--- System expandability: DSLRs are sometimes called 'system cameras'. This is due to the fact that unlike P&Ss, a DSLR is not just a camera; it's at the heart of an entire system. Each brand has dozens of lenses available, plus many more from third-party lens manufacturers. You could get flashes, transmitters, remotes, and many other goodies and they will all work seamlessly and communicate properly to one another. BTW, this is why you should choose your first SLR very carefully: you're probably buying into a system. First you get a camera and lens, then another lens, then maybe another lens or a flash, and then the a new camera comes out so you buy that. It's quite the pain to switch to a different brand once you're bought in to the system.
--- Viewfinder: By definition, a DSLR is a single lens reflex camera; what that means is that inside the camera just behind the lens mount there's a mirror, which projects the image from the lens into a prism, which in turn shows up in the viewfinder. The big advantage of this is that when you look through the viewfinder you're actually looking through lens, and as such are seeing exactly what the lens sees. This gives you an extremely accurate and life-like view, which makes it easy to compose your shots properly. A viewfinder also lets you use the camera in bright light without worrying about not being able to see the screen.
--- Speed: A DSLR is ready to shoot almost instantly after being turned on. No matter where you are, be it a menu or playing back you pictures, a slight tap of the shutter button and the camera is instantly ready to shoot. Focus is nearly instantaneous, and shutter lag is pretty much a non-issue. Another speed aspect is continuous shooting - holding down the shutter button while the camera rattles off picture after picture. An entry-level camera  could easily do around 4.5fps (frames per second), while higher level cameras could do 7 or 8 (or 12, if you count the $6800 Canon 1D X).

DSLR cons:
--- Size and weight: There's no getting around it: DSLRs are big and bulky, especially if you're carrying more than one lens.
--- Price: DSLRs start at about $450, and go way up. One of the most common cameras, the Canon T4i, will set you back about a grand. And then you want to buy another lens. And another one. And another one... :D
--- Video: DSLR video is a really weird situation. On the one hand the quality is INSANE. Just look on Vimeo and see what people have been doing with the Canon 5DMk2 and Mk3 and you'll see what I mean. On the other hand, if you look at the behind the scenes video of one of those, you'll see that the camera is mounted on a rig costing $10K or more. The rig stabilizes the camera and provides support for the focus controls, the zoom controls, the sound system, and many other things. Why is all this necessary? Very simple - because the camera does a horrible job at all this if left to it's own devices. Focusing during video is horrible, especially if anything's moving through the scene. What this means is that if you're buying an SLR and are planning on taking videos of your kids running around in the park, you will be sorely disappointed - nothing will be in focus half the time, and when the camera finally does achieve focus, the built-in mike will have picked up every grind and whirr of the lens as it moved back and forth. Canon has made some progress on eliminating these issues with their new STM lenses, but for now that's only two cameras and two lenses, and even that isn't perfect.

__________

Mirrorless: Known by many different names (ILCs and EVILs for example), the industry has seemed to settle on Mirrorless lately. This was the brainchild of a joint venture between Olympus and Panasonic, and was aimed on creating an interchangeable-lens camera in with a P&S body and DSLR-like image quality, and has been wildly successful. Olympus and Panasonic are still the major players with their Micro 4/3s system, followed by Sony with their NEX line. Many others have tried to take over market share from the big 3, but have been largely unsuccessful mainly due to inferior products. Nikon 1, Canon, M, and Samsung NX are examples of fairly unpopular systems.

Most mirrorless cameras have a P&S form-factor, albeit somewhat larger. With the exception of Olympus and Panasonic, the lenses are not interchangeable between brands, but adapters are available to convert practically any DSLR (or old rangefinder camera) lens to just about every system. Most adapters will not autofocus the lens, so it's not exactly a perfect solution.

Mirrorless pros:
--- Size and weight: This is the main draw for most people. While not exactly pocket sized once a lens is in place, it it still a fairly compact kit and could be carried in a purse with ease. It's more like a large P&S than a small DSLR.
--- Price: Generally cheaper than a DSLR of a similar level. The Panasonics and Olympus (Olympusus? Olympi? ???) especially seem to be on sale more often than not.
--- Image quality: About as good as an SLR, simple as that.
--- Expandability: Like DSLRs, these cameras are part of a system. In the last couple of months more and more third parties have started to make lenses too. Micro 4/3s is a much more robust system then Sony NEX though, with many more lenses available.
--- Video: Video on mirrorless cameras is insanely fantastic. Similar in quality to an SLR, but with the ease of use of a P&S. It focuses quickly, perfectly, and fairly quietly.

Mirrorless cons:
--- Lenses: Far smaller selection than SLRs, although to be fair most important lenses are covered.
--- Image quality: A DSLR will still have slightly better image quality, especially in low light scenarios.
--- Viewfinders: Most don’t have viewfinders at all, which make it harder to use in low light. Some of those have axillary finders you could out in the hotshoe (usually at exorbitant prices or some reason), but these are just to give you a general idea of what the camera is seeing.
--- Batteries: Uses batteries like a P&S (200-400 shots), while a DSLR usually gets around 2000 shots per battery.
--- Speed: Focusing, while worlds better than P&Ss, isn't quite up to DSLR standards yet, but that's getting better every day.
--- Control: While mirrorless camera offer the same level of control as DSLRs, very often you'll have to dig through menus to get to where you want to. The main point of mirrorless being cutting down on size, buttons and knobs were eliminated without mercy.

___________

Lesson Summary:
--- Point & Shoots are great for most everyday shooting. Cheap, more options than you could ever want, great image quality and video. Quite difficult (but definitely possible - I'll show you how) to get the 'pro' look.
--- DSLR are king when it comes to image quality, control, and expandability. For the best pictures in any situation, go for a DSLR. Video, not so much.
--- Mirrorless cameras are the best of both worlds, with some caveats. Amazing image quality, the best video, and fairly small and portable. Less control and versatility than an SLR, though.

I'll expand more and show examples on all the above points in the next lesson when we discuss the specs and technology of all this.



Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: hocker on May 03, 2013, 04:57:37 AM
Thanks! Sounds really interesting!

P.s. I enjoyed your writing style!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on May 03, 2013, 05:52:24 AM
Thanks! Sounds really interesting!

P.s. I enjoyed your writing style!
+1
Thanks a lot!

One thing- so sounds like the mirrorless option is the best - but is pretty new and gets better every day.. So it's prob worth it to wait and give them more time to "fix-up" prob and stabilize their models etc b4 buying one now?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Shreknit on May 03, 2013, 08:36:31 AM
Amazing detail thanks so much for giving so much of your time so informative!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Moshe123 on May 03, 2013, 08:58:44 AM
Thanks!! Really enjoying even as a total n00b. Amazing.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Marco Polo on May 03, 2013, 08:59:33 AM
Great info! Looking forward to the second lesson.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Moshe123 on May 03, 2013, 08:59:58 AM
P.S. I enjoyed your writing style!

+100
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YankyDoodle on May 03, 2013, 09:01:52 AM
Awesome write-up! I just committed to the Canon t4i and definitely could have used this run down 2 months ago! We are very happy with it so far and can't wait for your future tutorials to learn how to use it better.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on May 03, 2013, 09:53:28 AM
Very nice so far.
It sounds like you're a mirrorless fan for most average folk.
Any particular model that stands out?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on May 03, 2013, 09:55:40 AM
You're not a fan of the nx series. Would you recommend the nx20 if I could get it at a serious discount
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 10:02:07 AM
It sounds like you're a mirrorless fan for most average folk.
Any particular model that stands out?

Yes, I feel that it delivers the best value for most people, even with only the kit lens. SLR quality in a tiny body, that's quite hard to beat.

My personal favorite is the Sony NEX-5r (I have the 5n, which is last year's version). The NEX- F3 is also a good choice (it's about $400 these days).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 10:04:10 AM
You're not a fan of the nx series. Would you recommend it if I could get it at a serious discount

Not exactly true. The NX is a great system. It itsn't as popular as the others due to the very small lens selection (mostly). For the right price it may absolutely be worth it.

Which model is it and how much?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on May 03, 2013, 10:07:59 AM
NX20 kit. Possibly in the mid to high 3's
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on May 03, 2013, 10:08:34 AM
What's the difference between the Nex-5R and the NEX-6/B?

Is this promo worth anything?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=amb_link_375879882_1?ie=UTF8&docId=1001196111&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER/?tag=cl03f-20
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on May 03, 2013, 10:17:14 AM
Wow! Thanks! Awesome!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SavingsBigtime on May 03, 2013, 10:55:59 AM
maybe a seminar on this right after dans? 
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 12:05:02 PM
What's the difference between the Nex-5R and the NEX-6/B?

Is this promo worth anything?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html/ref=amb_link_375879882_1?ie=UTF8&docId=1001196111&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER/?tag=cl03f-20

The 6 is a more ‘pro’ version of the 5 – it gives you a stunning viewfinder, a hotshoe, a mode-selection dial, and better ergonomics. The 5 has a better screen (it tilts all the way 180° up as opposed to 90° on the 6), and more importantly, it’s a touchscreen, whereas the 6 is not. The touchscreen is awesome for taking videos – I could just touch my daughter’s face on the screen while recording a video, and the camera will track her perfectly no matter how fast she runs around. Image quality will be identical between the two.
 
If I were you I’d go for the 5 – the advantages the 6 gives you is not worth $250 to the average person, plus you get the touchscreen which is awesome.
 
The Amazon deal is actually pretty good. For about $50 more than the regular kit you get a wider lens (16-50 vs. 18-55; the 2mm difference at the wide end makes a much bigger difference than the 5mm difference at the long end), and even better, the lens is tiny, bringing it almost into pocket camera size.
 
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 12:09:15 PM
NX20 kit. Possibly in the mid to high 3's

Absolutely sick deal. If you're ok with the size (it's not as small as other mirrorless cameras) then absolutely go for it. It's a lovely camera.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centurion on May 03, 2013, 12:25:05 PM
looking to take pictures of very small jewelry pieces. any help would be appriciated.
willing to buy if needed light box-macro lens- mint tri pod etc.
looking to spend less than $500
TIA
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on May 03, 2013, 01:37:50 PM
Awesome  :) Thanks

This is my favorite part:
Yes, I feel that it delivers the best value for most people, even with only the kit lens. SLR quality in a tiny body, that's quite hard to beat.

My personal favorite is the Sony NEX-5r (I have the 5n, which is last year's version). The NEX- F3 is also a good choice (it's about $400 these days).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on May 03, 2013, 01:46:34 PM
The 6 is a more ‘pro’ version of the 5 – it gives you a stunning viewfinder, a hotshoe, a mode-selection dial, and better ergonomics. The 5 has a better screen (it tilts all the way 180° up as opposed to 90° on the 6), and more importantly, it’s a touchscreen, whereas the 6 is not. The touchscreen is awesome for taking videos – I could just touch my daughter’s face on the screen while recording a video, and the camera will track her perfectly no matter how fast she runs around. Image quality will be identical between the two.
 
If I were you I’d go for the 5 – the advantages the 6 gives you is not worth $250 to the average person, plus you get the touchscreen which is awesome.
 
The Amazon deal is actually pretty good. For about $50 more than the regular kit you get a wider lens (16-50 vs. 18-55; the 2mm difference at the wide end makes a much bigger difference than the 5mm difference at the long end), and even better, the lens is tiny, bringing it almost into pocket camera size.

$650 still seems like a lot for a mirrorless camera. There has to be cheaper options out there. Like these which start at $370:

http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchCatalog?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&N=4294961698&searchType=outlet (http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchCatalog?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&N=4294961698&searchType=outlet)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 03, 2013, 04:47:41 PM
I suggest having the "What camera should I get / Is this a good deal" discussion in a separate thread.

Or perhaps each of these lessons (and the ensuing discussion) should be a thread of it's own?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on May 03, 2013, 04:53:00 PM
I suggest having the "What camera should I get / Is this a good deal" discussion in a separate thread.

Or perhaps each of these lessons (and the ensuing discussion) should be a thread of it's own?
+1
Especially considering the fact that there seem to be a few of those threads that popped up recently 8)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 06:40:06 PM
$650 still seems like a lot for a mirrorless camera. There has to be cheaper options out there. Like these which start at $370:

http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchCatalog?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&N=4294961698&searchType=outlet (http://store.sony.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/SearchCatalog?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&N=4294961698&searchType=outlet)

Correct. The cameras in your link are last year's models, and I highly recommend them (Iuse 'em myself). This doesn't take away from the fact that the Amazon deal is a good one; for a latest gen camera and new tiny lens $650 is a good deal.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 06:44:37 PM
I suggest having the "What camera should I get / Is this a good deal" discussion in a separate thread.

Or perhaps each of these lessons (and the ensuing discussion) should be a thread of it's own?

+1 on the first idea. Maybe post a link here when you start a new "what camera should I get" if you want me (and anyone else following this thread) to have a look.

-1 on the second idea - my personal preference is that everything should be in one thread, with the wiki used as a table of contents to jump from lesson to lesson. But that's just me, if the oilam wants it as a separate thread for every lesson, let me know and I'll do it that way.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 03, 2013, 06:52:17 PM
I've added a poll to better understand what type of cameras everyone here uses. Please take a minute to vote - you could choose up to 3 options if you use more than one camera.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on May 04, 2013, 05:59:44 PM
so youre saying the STM on the t4i is not that great. i have the t2i and was looking to upgrade solely because of the stm. do you suggest i wait for the new model?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on May 04, 2013, 06:00:47 PM
also poll doesnt allow for 2 entries. i have the t2i for around the neck, and s95 on the belt...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 04, 2013, 10:25:12 PM
I've added a poll to better understand what type of cameras everyone here uses. Please take a minute to vote - you could choose up to 3 options if you use more than one camera.
How about a "P&S but I plan on getting an SLR or Mirrorless in the near future" option?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 04, 2013, 10:30:41 PM
-1 on the second idea - my personal preference is that everything should be in one thread, with the wiki used as a table of contents to jump from lesson to lesson. But that's just me, if the oilam wants it as a separate thread for every lesson, let me know and I'll do it that way.
My reason for suggesting it was that as you post more and more lessons there will be many different discussions going on and it might be hard to follow.
OTOH, breaking it up might make it too fragmented, as I imagine most of the topics are all intertwined.

Hence my "perhaps" in the suggestion, I'm not really sure which will be better...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 04, 2013, 10:32:55 PM
so youre saying the STM on the t4i is not that great. i have the t2i and was looking to upgrade solely because of the stm. do you suggest i wait for the new model?

Nope, 'not great' compared to mirrorless. Still worlds better than regular DSLR.

All upcoming Canons will support STM (as do the new T5i and SL1), and I assume that most new lenses will too. If you shoot a lot of video d are frustrated, then STM should be a very worthwhile upgrade. Stick to the T4i though, the T5i really offers nothing new.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 04, 2013, 10:33:36 PM
also poll doesnt allow for 2 entries. i have the t2i for around the neck, and s95 on the belt...

Anyone else having this issue? It seems to be working fine from my end.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 04, 2013, 10:36:25 PM
How about a "P&S but I plan on getting an SLR or Mirrorless in the near future" option?

Good idea, done.

My reason for suggesting it was that as you post more and more lessons there will be many different discussions going on and it might be hard to follow.
OTOH, breaking it up might make it too fragmented, as I imagine most of the topics are all intertwined.

Hence my "perhaps" in the suggestion, I'm not really sure which will be better...

Good point. I think for now I'll keep everything here. I'll see how it goes after a couple of lessons, if it gets too confusing I'll break it up by section.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 04, 2013, 10:43:23 PM
Good idea, done.
I knew I should've waited before voting... :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy2 on May 04, 2013, 11:18:49 PM
Thank you so much! The first lesson was very informative! Looking forward to the rest!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on May 04, 2013, 11:25:49 PM
Can we add a 'smartphone' option?  :P I mostly use my iPhone5 cam.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on May 05, 2013, 02:51:33 AM
Nope, 'not great' compared to mirrorless. Still worlds better than regular DSLR.

All upcoming Canons will support STM (as do the new T5i and SL1), and I assume that most new lenses will too. If you shoot a lot of video d are frustrated, then STM should be a very worthwhile upgrade. Stick to the T4i though, the T5i really offers nothing new.

So will these new STM lenses actually focus quicker and smoother than others, making it easier to capture video, or is it more for noise reduction?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 05, 2013, 02:53:28 AM
So will these new STM lenses actually focus quicker and smoother than others, making it easier to capture video, or is it more for noise reduction?

All three - faster, smoother, and quieter.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on May 05, 2013, 03:04:33 AM
All three - faster, smoother, and quieter.

Fast enough to be practical to use for regular family videos?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Twin on May 05, 2013, 03:08:34 AM
Can we add a 'smartphone' option?  :P I mostly use my iPhone5 cam.
+1
If there is anything you can do to make your pic look nicer with such a camera.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 05, 2013, 03:12:26 AM
Fast enough to be practical to use for regular family videos?

TBH I've never personally tried that. On paper it seems like it might be, but I'll be able to get my hands on one Monday and I'll report back with my thoughts.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 05, 2013, 03:16:34 AM
+1
If there is anything you can do to make your pic look nicer with such a camera.
Can we add a 'smartphone' option?  :P I mostly use my iPhone5 cam.

Sure you could make your pics look nicer even if you only use a smartphone, no question about it.

The techniques for smartphones will be extremely similar to P&Ss, so I've lumped them together as one group in the poll.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: bem684 on May 05, 2013, 11:16:08 AM
I strongly recommend the videos from Michael the Maven aka Michael the Mentor aka Michael Andrew. 

I worked for a frum camera store for about 4 years and Michael once gave us a HUGE amount of business by posting on a professional photo forum that we had the Canon 5D III a day before B&H or Adorama (this camera was selling for around $5k at the time, and we got dozens of sales in 24 hours after he made that post).  He has a large following apparently.  Anyway he asked us to start selling his DVDs, which we did.  I bought one for myself when I purchased my Rebel T3i a few months ago. 

I love his videos - they explain every feature and function of your camera, plus photography basics and accessories tips and recommendations.  He shoots with Canon gear so most (but not all) of his videos are Canon related.  But he does such a great job explaining concepts that it's worth looking to see if he has any videos for your camera (or user level).

http://michaelthemaven.com/products/ (http://michaelthemaven.com/products/)

If you want to support a frum company who also sells his videos, check out PMI Digital on ebay:

http://stores.ebay.com/PMI-Digital/_i.html?_nkw=michael&submit=Search&_sid=227383702 (http://stores.ebay.com/PMI-Digital/_i.html?_nkw=michael&submit=Search&_sid=227383702)

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on May 05, 2013, 02:57:59 PM
Are all micro 4/3 lenses from different brands (Olympus, Panasonic etc) interchangeable with each other?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 05, 2013, 02:59:06 PM
Are all micro 4/3 lenses from different brands (Olympus, Panasonic etc) interchangeable with rematch other?

Yes.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jack12 on May 06, 2013, 02:50:12 PM
What would the Nikon Coolpix P100 - http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-P100-Vibration-Reduction-Black/dp/B0034XFG86 be classified as?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 06, 2013, 02:51:41 PM
What would the Nikon Coolpix P100 - http://www.amazon.com/Nikon-P100-Vibration-Reduction-Black/dp/B0034XFG86 be classified as?

P&S.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on May 06, 2013, 03:20:17 PM
Yes.

Should we change this to all except Sony?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 06, 2013, 03:25:57 PM
Should we change this to all except Sony?

There are plenty of other mirrorless systems which are not compatible with each other. Canon M, Nikon 1, Samsung NX to name a few. The only interchangeable brands are Olympus and Panasonic since the Micro 4/3 mount is a joint venture between them.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Moshe123 on May 06, 2013, 03:33:00 PM
It was awesome to meet Mr. Tall Fishy last night!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on May 06, 2013, 03:51:15 PM
It was awesome to meet Mr. Tall Fishy last night!
+1
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 07, 2013, 12:59:14 AM
It was awesome to meet Mr. Tall Fishy last night!
+1

Thanks, it was awesome meeting all of you and putting a face to the name :D.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 07, 2013, 01:06:18 AM
There are already many posts in this thread discussing camera buying questions. If possible, I'd like to keep this thread on topic and discuss the art of photography as opposed to 'which camera should I get'. I've made a Which Camera Should I Get? Master Thread (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0), please feel free to ask any questions related to choosing a camera there. I will be following that thread closely and will try to help as much as possible.

Thanks!

Also, the next lesson should be live either tomorrow or Wednesday. I'm almost done :).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on May 07, 2013, 07:17:37 AM
Also, the next lesson should be live either tomorrow or Wednesday. I'm almost done :).
Thanks! Was waiting but didn't want to ask for fear of being a nudge to someone already giving so much time for free.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on May 07, 2013, 03:43:31 PM
It was awesome to meet Mr. Tall Fishy last night!
it was awesome meeting all of you and putting a face to the name :D.
+1  8)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 12, 2013, 03:14:24 AM
Lesson 2.

Remember, click on the wiki if you want to see only the lessons and not the other posts.

Camera specs: What do they mean, and which ones matter to me?

So you've decided on the type of camera you want to get; now the fun part begins. You walk into Best Buy and are assaulted with a hundred different models, all looking pretty much alike, and a salesperson who doesn't know the difference between a microwave and a TV. To top it all off, every camera has a 3-foot list of specs and features attached. Where do you start???

Let's discuss some of the things you might see and how to sift thought the marketing gibberish to find the camera for you.

There are three vital factors which will determine the quality of the pictures your camera will produce: the sensor, the lens, and the processor. The lens projects the image onto the sensor, the sensor records it, and the processor turns it into something you could actually see. Note that by 'quality' I mean technical quality; the artistic quality of your pictures is up to you and you alone.
_________

The sensor
This is the most important part in your camera - it's the 'film', the medium that captures the image. The better the sensor, the better your images. The sensor consists of a chip made out of millions of pixels, with a color filter and micro-lens over every one of them. Every pixel is capable of picking up one data point of light; put a couple of million of these on a chip and you have millions of data points, which the processor then translates into a picture. Here's what you need to know about sensors:

Megapixels: This is the number of pixels on the sensor. 1 million pixels equals 1 megapixel, therefore a 12mp camera will have 12 million individual pixels on its sensor. Once upon a time this was the number one most important camera spec, the one which would generally determine which model you bought. This is not the case anymore; ANY camera currently available will have more megapixels then you know what to do with.

Contrary to popular belief, more megapixels does not necessarily mean better pictures. Back in the day when you had to decide between a 3.2mp camera and a 5.1mp one, it really mattered and the 5.1 would deliver a better image. Nowadays, when every point & shoot has 10, 12, 14 megapixels and even a basic DSLR has 18 or 24, all of them will deliver stunning quality images.

So what’s the advantage of more megapixels? Two things – the more megapixels, the larger you can print, and the more you could crop. As far as printing, for 99% of us in 99% of situations, 10mp is enough – you could easily print up to 11x14” with that. Printing only 4x6”? Technically, 3 megapixels is enough for that. The big advantage then is cropping. The more megapixels, the more you could crop and still end up with a high quality picture. For example, say you took a horizontal shot and want to crop it into a vertical – you’d lose more than half your picture, and therefore more than half your resolution. If you started out with a 14mp image, you now have 6 or so megapixels left; but if you started out with 10mp, you now only have 3 of them left and can't print as big.

Megapixels also have nothing to do with video quality; even 1080p HD is only 2.07mp.

Are there times where less megapixels is more? You betcha. Which bring us right to our next discussion: sensor size.

Sensor Size - This is probably the most important sensor spec, as it had the biggest direct impact on the picture. The sensor size is also the biggest differentiator between a point & shoot and DSLR. If the sensor is bigger, it means that each individual pixel could be bigger, which means more light-gathering ability per pixel, which directly means better pictures. Therefore, all things being equal, a bigger sensor will give you a better picture. With few exceptions, the sensor size goes up as the cameras go up - a P&S will have the smallest, an advanced P&S will be bigger, and so on for mirrorless, APS-C DSLRs, and full-frame DSLRs.

What kind of difference will it make in your pictures? Quite a few. The biggest is probably that you get less noise the bigger the sensor gets. Noise is the colored speckles or grain you see in many pictures taken in low-light situations, when the higher ISO setting pushes the sensor to be more sensitive to light. Therefore, if the actual pixels are bigger, they don't have to be pushed so far since they're inherently more light-sensitive.

What this means in practice is that in low-light situations (not specifically 'dark' - an indoor space that's not flooded with light would also require higher ISOs), you'd get a cleaner, sharper picture without noise or blur. Less noise because the pixels aren't working as hard, and less blur because a two-stop increase in ISO means a two-stop increase in shutter speed (this'll be discussed and clarified in the Basic Exposure lesson).

These two pictures of the Tetons about an hour before sunrise clearly show the difference in noise between high and low ISOs; the better your sensor, the higher the ISO could go before noise becomes an issue. The first picture was taken at ISO 8000 (very high), and the second one at ISO 400 (fairly low). Both were taken with a Nikon D700 and a 24-70 f/2.8 lens.


(http://imageshack.us/a/img541/7161/dsc5475x.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/a/img541/7161/dsc5475x.jpg/)

(http://img404.imageshack.us/img404/2637/dsc54762.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/404/dsc54762.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

Something to be mindful about is that megapixels matter here, and less could be more. If you have a 10MP camera and a 14MP camera with the same sized sensor, the 10MP will be better in low light, due to 2 million less pixels spread over the same area. The pixels therefore are bigger and/or have more space between them, both of which means less noise.

Another benefit of a large sensor is the ability to get out of focus backgrounds. This is why you rarely see portraits with a nice out of focus background coming from a P&S - the sensor is simply not capable of it. In a future lesson I'll show you how you could get your P&S to blur your backgrounds, to a degree. But for now just remember this: when someone shoots with a DSLR or mirrorless after years of using only a P&S, the ability to blur their backgrounds easily is one of their favorite things.

This type of picture is pretty much impossible to take with a P&S-size sensor:
(http://img16.imageshack.us/img16/7770/dsc3302m.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/16/dsc3302m.jpg/)
Nikon D600, 85mm f/1.8, 1/1250th @f/1.8, ISO 200

The sensor size also directly dictates how your lens will act, if it acts longer than marked (crop factor). We'll discuss this in more detail in the lens section below, and in more in depth in the Lenses 101 section.

Other than that, there are some more benefits to larger sensor - slightly better color, better dynamic range, etc. (all of which will be explained later, but are not very important to the buying process).

How do you know how big any given sensor is? Every camera has this info hidden somewhere in its spec sheet. It'll be listed either as a fraction (1/1.7" is larger than 1/2.3"), as a diagonal measurement (usually in inches - bigger number is better), or WxH (usually in mm). Mirrorless and DSLRs (and very rarely, a P&S) will usually have an additional designation such as APS-C or M4/3 (see below). On rare occasions you will also find the actual individual pixel size (measured in microns, "µ"). This last one won't help you much, since you usually won't have what to compare it to.

Here are some common sensor size designations and what they mean, starting from the largest:
Full frame means that the sensor is exactly the size of a single 35mm negative frame. The most sought after size, this is the best and most expensive. Found in top-level DSLRs (and in the $2800 Sony RX-1 P&S).
APS-C is about 75% of full frame and is found in the vast majority of DSLRs, as well as in some Mirrorless systems (Sony NEX, Samsung NX). Quality is getting closer and closer to to full frame with every new camera. Nikon calls APS-C "DX", and Canon version is a hair smaller (about 72% of full frame). Allows smaller camera bodies and lenses (see Lenses 101 for more details on this).
Micro 4/3s is a joint venture between Olympus and Panasonic and is 50% of full frame. Almost as good as APS-C, but not quite the same in low light or out of focus backgrounds (very close though).
1" is exactly what it sounds like: 1" diagonal. Smaller than M4/3 but larger than most P&S sensors. Used in some advanced P&Ss. Nikon also uses those in their mirrorless cameras and calls it CX.
1/1.7" is even smaller. Mostly used for advanced P&Ss.
1/2.3", 1/2.33", etc. are small sensors used in point & shoots.
Foveon is unique to Sigma and is about halfway between APS-C and M4/3 in size, and APS-H is the now-obsolete Canon size that was between APS-C and full frame.
Medium Format is 4 times as large as full-size, but unless you're in the market for a $43k camera (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/893196-REG/Hasselblad_3013666_H5D_200MS_Medium_Format_Digital.html), you don't have to worry about it ;).

This graphic gives you a great idea of how the different sensors compare to each other in size:
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Sensor_sizes_overlaid_inside_-_updated.svg)
Source (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/9a/Sensor_sizes_overlaid_inside_-_updated.svg)

Sensor Type: When you start looking at sensors you'll come across all kinds of terms and acronyms, most of which don't mean too much in real life. I won't get into all of them, but here are the most common ones you'll find and what they mean:
CCD - The traditional, most commonly used technology in point and shoots.
CMOS - Actually older then the CCD, it used to have resolution issues. Now that that issue has been overcome, CMOS is the most commonly used system in higher-end cameras (and most every phone, too). This includes mirrorless, DLSRs, and some P&Ss. CMOS uses less power than CCDs and is better in low light.
Backlit - Relatively new technology, this is also CMOS and is used in P&Ss and some phones. Slightly better low light performance than straight CMOS.
EXR, X-Trans, Foveon - Proprietary creations of Fuji or Sigma, these use completely different pixel layouts than traditional CCDs. EXRs strength is low light, while X-Trans and Foveon specialize in color rendition.
____________

The Lens
The lens is the second most important part of the camera. As opposed to the sensor, which is largely determined by the brand and type of the camera, when it comes to lenses you have far more options and decisions to make.

The lens is the 'eye' of the camera; what it sees gets recorded onto the sensor. It doesn't matter if your sensor is so awesome that it's made out of the hairs of baby unicorns; it could only record what the lens sees. Therefore, a good lens is absolutely vital. This is easier with P&Ss, but if you're buying an SLR or mirrorless you should give at least as much thought to your lens as to your camera.

I won't go in to the nitty-gritty of lenses here; that'll be covered in the Lenses 101 section down the road. I'll just touch upon the very basics that you need to know to make an informed decision.

Focal Length - The most important lens attribute, which tells you how much the lens 'sees'. Every lens will have this spec marked in mm, and some may have it in 'x' too (such as 10x). A zoom will have a set of two numbers; a prime (fixed lens) will have one. The lower the number, the wider the lens (wide-angle, WA). The higher the number, the 'longer' the lens (telephoto). A good zoom on a P&S will go from fairly wide to moderately tele, such as 24-240mm, or 10x zoom. Shorter zooms (let's say 5x) are not worse lenses; they simply aren't as flexible. In fact, since shorter zoom use simpler optical designs, they may in fact be better (such as less distortion).

A wide angle lens takes in a very large portion of the scene, and is therefore well suited for landscapes, large groups of people, and even smaller groups indoors. The wider the lens, the less you'd have to step back to get everything in the picture. A telephoto lens sees a very small portion of the scene, but it sees it bigger; therefore the 'longer' the lens the better it is for capturing distant shots. This is good for taking pictures of your kid's school play from across the room, or shooting animals on vacation (OK, that didn't come out quite right  :D).

What focal length lens to buy depends mainly on your personal use of the camera and/or lens. I personally suggest to get wider over longer - meaning that if your options are two very similar cameras, one with a 28-224mm (8x) zoom and one with 24-120mm (5x) zoom, I'd suggest the latter. Simple reason - if your lens isn't wide enough, there is no way you're gonna back up past that wall behind you to get one more person into your group shot. Wide angle is something that has to be done in-camera. If on the other hand your zoom is too short and the deer is too far away, you could always crop after the fact.

A prime lens is a lens with only one focal length, meaning it doesn't zoom at all. Primes give the highest quality images, far sharper than a zoom could produce. They usually also have extremely wide apertures (see below).

Most P&Ss today come with a fairly wide lens, and most zoom at at least 5x. Over the last 2 years ultracompacts have begun incorporation much larger zoom such as 12x or even 20x, due to new lens miniaturization techniques. You'll probably notice that some higher-end P&Ss have smaller zoom than you'd expect (2.5x, 4x). This is due to the undeniable fact that at the end of the day physics is physics, and the less you bend and contort the light coming in the better the quality. Superzoom P&Ss are usually much bigger than typical com,pacts (they look like shrunken-down SLRs), and have super zooms (duh!), anywhere from 30x to 50x. This is very convenient, but you pay for it in price, size, and a bit of image quality (not just because of the monster lens, but also because these cameras tend to have the very smallest sensors of them all).

Most SLRs and mirrorless cameras come with a 'kit lens'. This is typically an 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6. This is usually a good way to start, although many people choose to go with a bigger zoom right away, such as the 18-105, 18-135, or 18-200. Remember though that 18 is not 18; on APS-C cameras you have to multiply this by 1.5x, thus giving you a typical kit lens of 24-82 (approximately). THis is called the 'crop factor', and we'll discuss it in more detail later on. Also remember that typically, an 18-55 is a great lens. Sure it's not a large zoom by any standards, and the aperture is quite slow (see next section), but it will be sharp as a tack, quick focusing, and small and lightweight.

Something to remember in regards to zoom is that the difference in mm is far more pronounced at the wide end than at the tele end. This means that the 4mm difference between a 24mm and 28mm lens will make a far bigger difference than the 30mm between 220mm and 250mm.

In the picture below, you could see how much the scene would change had I used a 28mm lens instead of a 24mm one - everything outside the yellow square would not have been included. On the other hand, the two red squares show the approximate difference between 220 and 250mm lenses - not very much at all.

(http://img7.imageshack.us/img7/9201/8584719604b9fffa841do2.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/7/8584719604b9fffa841do2.jpg/)


Digital zoom is something you could ignore, and preferably never use. This is not a real zoom, as all it does is digitally crop the picture. You could do this on a computer with more precision and with better results.

(A quick note about focal length: If you look on the lens of your P&S you may see far smaller numbers than what we discussed (such as 5.6-56mm instead of 24-240mm). That is the actual, physical focal length and doesn't really mean anything to the end user. What matters is the 35mm equivalent of the lens, which usually written somewhere else on the camera.)

Aperture - This is the size of the lens opening. Again, I won't go into all the details in this lesson, but for now let’s just say that the bigger the maximum aperture the better. Bigger apertures means that more light could enter the lens and get passed along to the sensor; this equals faster focusing, better low light performance, and more out of focus backgrounds. The lower the aperture number (called the f-stop), the bigger the lens opening; hence, f/2.8 is much bigger than f/5.6 (it actually lets in 4 times as much light). In this example, f/2.8 is the max aperture; the opening could be made smaller (i.e. stopped down), usually to f/8 on P&Ss or f/22 on SLRs/mirrorless. You would need a camera that offers manual aperture control (usually A mode, AV on Canons) to do this; most P&Ss don’t offer that.

Apertures come in two flavors: constant and variable. The vast majority of zooms are variable aperture; a rare few P&S and most pro-level mirrorless and SLR lenses are constant. In a variable lens, the max aperture changes as you zoom; the further you zoom, the smaller it gets. On the other hand, a constant lens will keep the same maximum aperture throughout its zoom range.

Have a look at the Canon 110HS, which has a typical P&S lens. You’ll find the following markings on the lens: Canon Zoom Lens 5x IS 4.3-21.5mm 1:2.7-5.9. This means that it’s a 5x zoom, going from 4.3-21.5mm focal length, with a variable aperture of f2.7-5.9; at its widest (4.3mm) the max aperture is f/2.7, and as you zoom it gets smaller and smaller, until it hits f/5.9 at the longest zoom position (21.5mm). The IS stands for Image Stabilization, which we’ll discuss a bit further down.

On the other hand, look at the $2300 70-200 f/2.8 pro lens: it only has one aperture number, meaning that no matter if you're at 70 or at 200mm, your aperture could always go up to f/2.8.

Since a variable-aperture lens needs far less optical elements and design, they will be cheaper (by a lot ), smaller, and weigh far less than a constant aperture lens.

A prime lens will usually have an extremely wide aperture, with f/1.4 and 1.8 being the most common. There are even a few f/0.95 lenses on the market today (here's a cheap one (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/586190-REG/Leica_11_602_50mm_f_0_95_Noctilux_M_Aspherical.html) ;)).

Here you could see how the lower the f/stop number, the larger the aperture. Every step here is a full stop apart from the ones next to it, meaning that it's twice as big and lets in twice the light (and vice versa). The common f/stops continue past f/8 to f/11, f/16, f/22, and f/32.
(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Aperture_diagram.svg)
Source (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/87/Aperture_diagram.svg)

Lens Branding: On point & shots, you'll very often find other manufacturer's branding on the lens. Many Panasonics carry Leica branding, Sonys have Zeiss, Samsungs have Schneider-KREUZNACH, etc. What's happening here is that these companies are licencing the names from these storied lens makers. Will it make a big difference in your pictures? No. Should you go with one of those cameras over another that doesn't have this kind of branding? I don't think so. A regular Canon or Nikon lens is just as good.

The reason a real Leica lens costs north of $5000 is due to the crazy expensive glass, insane tolerances, and the fact that every single lens is assembled by hand in Germany and is inspected for some 30-odd issues every step of the way. No way slapping a Leica label on a Panasonic lens is gonna give you any of that.
________
The Processor
The processor is another vital part of the camera, but one over you have very little control over. The processor is the 'brain' of the camera, and influences everything - the speed of focusing, the amount of features, and most importantly, the image quality. It'll analyze the raw date from sensor, figure out what kind of picture you've just taken, and apply what it assumes are the correct settings (sharpening, color, white balance, noise reduction, etc., etc.).

Unfortunately, there aren't many options available to you as far as processors go when buying a camera. Usually any given brand will have one or two versions of their processors on the market at any given time. So why is it important for you to know about the processor? Because sometimes you might have a choice between two generations of the same camera (such as right after a new camera was introduced), and you have to decide if it's worth it for you to spends more on the new one. Often it's a good idea to go with the older one, since most camera upgrades are incremental, meaning that there's not much real life difference between the two. Maybe a slighter bigger zoom, some more scene modes, etc. However, at the point in the cycle when manufacturers switch to a new generation sensor (usually every two years, or around 3-4 camera generations (P&S - with DSLRs it's usually two generations), it may be a worthwhile upgrade. Your pictures will simply be better looking, your low light shots will have less noise (due to better noise-reduction algorithms), and everything will be faster.

So how do you know what gen processor the camera has? Just look at any part of the camera literature - camera companies love to advertise it. Canon calls their processors Digic - they're currently transitioning from Digic 5 to 6. Nikon's are called EXPEED; they're currently at EXPEED 3. When choosing between two camera generations, simply compare the processor generations. If one's newer, it's probably worth getting it over the old one.
________
Other Specs

Video:
Every digital camera these days is capable of taking amazing videos. Here's what you have to know to wade through all the video specs:
Resolution is the most basic video spec - how sharp will it be? The vast majority of cameras these days will shoot up to 1920x1080 (commonly called Full HD, or 1080HD). This is usually the best option for playback on a computer or TV. Some cheaper cameras will only give you 1280x720 (called simply HD, or 720HD). It's rare to find a camera these days that only shoots 640x480 (VGA).
Frame Rate Is the speed at which the camera takes individual pictures (or frames) that make up the video. The most common is 30 fps(Frames Per Second), meaning that every second of video is made out of 30 separate pictures. This produces a nice, smooth video that works well for 99% of situations. Most DSLRs also shoot at 24 fps, which is considered more 'cinematic'. Many cameras are also capable of shooting at 60 fps, which appears smoother. Some people find this too smooth and unrealistic. A big advantage of higher frame rates is that it could be used to create slow motion video in post production. If you have one second of video at 60 fps, it could be turned into two seconds at 30 fps. It will still be nice and smooth, but now you've essentially slowed down time by half. This is how some cameras have a slow motion mode - it'll take 60, 120, or even more fps. Note though that most slo-mo modes that shoot over 60 fps do so at a very reduced resolution, so it's a trade off.
In the US, TV is usually broadcast at 30 fps (actually 29.97, to be precise), while most movies are at 24 fps (23.976), hence the 'cinematic' designation.
Progressive or Interlaced denotes if the video is actually one actual picture per frame, or of it's averaged from two frames. This is designated by either a P or I, so your camera says '1080p' you know you're getting progressive, while '720i' will be interlaced. Since progressive is made up up individual pictures, the quality is usually better, and it's easy to grab a single frame and save it as a still picture. Interlaced on the other hand averages two frames into one, by using alternating lines of each. This takes up less space (since it really only takes half of the stated pictures), but makes it very difficult to extract a frame, since if there is any movement in the frame the lines will show up. This wiki page (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deinterlacing) has some good pictures about halfway down where you could see the difference between the two.
Compression Format dictates what file type your camera will output, and how much space it will take up. The most popular these days is H.264, which outputs as an MOV file. This is a very efficient format, as it takes up relatively little space, retains the original quality, and is easy to edit. AVI is also quite common, though it takes up more space than H.264. AVCHD and AVCHD-Lite are found fairly often, mostly in Sony and Panasonic cameras. It's much bulkier than H.264 and AVI, but handles high frame rates and is supposedly better quality. AVCHD and AVCHD-Lite does play on Windows natively and are quite the pain in the neck to edit (they generally have to be converted first).

RAW: Many advanced P&Ss and all mirrorless and DSLRs are capable of shooting in the RAW format, as opposed to just JPEG.

What's RAW? When the camera takes a picture, the sensor captures a huge amount of data. It then passes all that to the processor, which 'finishes' the picture. It'll apply color correction, contrast adjustments, sharpening, noise reduction, and a hundred other things. When it's done it'll save the file to the card as a finished JPEG file, and throw away all the original sensor data. Usually, the camera is pretty good at figuring all this out and delivering good results. However, what if you want to make these decisions? What if the camera keeps on putting out pictures that you feel are too dark, or too vivid? Sure you could edit them in Photoshop later and try to fix it, but instead of working with all the data that was actually captured, your working only with the little bit of data the camera saw fit to include in the JPEG file.

This is where RAW comes in. Simply put, it's the raw data as captured by your sensor, with nothing thrown out by the processor. What this means is that you make all the decisions, not the camera. If you shoot in RAW you will have to edit each and every picture, since the camera doesn't do it for you. This is obviously quite time consuming - I personally have about 20000 RAW files waiting to be edited. The advantages are enormous though - since you're working with so much data, you could do amazing things which the camera would never have figured out on it's own.

Have a look at this picture below - the first one is how the camera decided it should look, and the second one is after I took the RAW file and made the decisions myself. There's no Photoshop wizardry happening here; all I've adjusted is exposure, contrast, sharpening, color, etc. - all things the camera usually does by itself. (The only 'Photoshopping' was removing the small (hardly visible) sign on the bottom left and the dark spot in the center.)

(http://imageshack.us/a/img577/9528/dsc6348.jpg)

(http://imageshack.us/a/img827/1185/dsc6348final.jpg)

Besides of the obvious issue of having to edit every single picture, there are some other drawbacks to shooting RAW. By virtue of the file containing so much info, the files are also HUGE - my Nikon D600 gives me less than 600 RAW shots on a 32GB card, compared to over 2000 JPEGs. And due to the large file sizes, shooting RAW is slower than JPEG. On mirrorless and DSLRs that's not so much of an issue as the cameras are built for that, with a P&S the slowdown will be quite noticeable.

Most cameras that shoot RAW also allow you to shoot RAW+JPEG - this is the best of both worlds, the control of RAW but the convenience of a ready JPEG if you can't or won't want to edit every picture. The downside of this is that it takes up even more space, and it's even slower.

In order to edit the RAW files, you'll need special software. The best RAW editor/converter is Adobe  Lightroom or ACR (Adobe Camera Raw, part of Photoshop). A camera that shoots RAW will usually include a basic converter too.

But in the end, there's a reason most pros shoot RAW full time - it just gives them more control and options.

Burst mode is when you hold down the shutter button and the camera takes a series of pictures in a row. This is extremely useful when shooing kids or fast-moving objects, as you could take a burst of pictures and choose the best one later. The speed at which the camera takes pictures in this mode is measured in fps - the more frames per second the better.

Most cameras have a limit of the amount of pictures you could take, so if your camera could do 5 fps with a 10-frame max, you'll get 2-second bursts. Note that some cameras will also reduce the megapixels in this mode.

A viewfinder is a very useful thing to have. It'll allow you to frame your picture even in bright sunlight, when it's usually hard to see the screen. Also, due to the fact that you hold the camera up to your face, it'll be steadier, so less chance of blurry pictures.

Every DSLR has a viewfinder, and some mirrorless and P&Ss have them too. For some mirrorless cameras you could buy a separate viewfinder which will snap into your hot shoe.

There are two types of viewfinders: Electronic (EVF) and optical (OVF). An EVF is essentially a tiny LDC screen, and generally mimics what you'd see on the main LCD. This means that not only could you compose your shot through it, you could also playback your pictures and go through the menus, all in bright sunlight. Most superzoom P&Ss, all of Sony's SLRs, and all mirrorless cameras (the ones with a viewfinder, that is) use an EVF. An OVF itself also comes in two flavors (sorry!) - through-the-lens (TTL), and tunnel. A TTL OVF is the better of the two, as it looks right through the lens (via a mirror), so what you see is exactly what you get. A tunnel-style OVF is simply a window, and gives you only a rough approximation of your composition.

So which one is the best? A TTL OVF gives you the best view - exactly what the lens see, and it all looks very lifelike and 3-D. An EVF on the other hand shows you much more info. But still, a tunnel-style OVF is still better than nothing.

Scene Modes - When a manufacturer runs out of real upgrades to new cameras, they fall back on the trusty 'more scene modes!' argument. A scene mode is when you choose from a pre-determined list of 'scenes' on the camera, and the camera will optimize the picture to that. Shooting a sunset? Set the camera to sunset mode. Flowers? Flower mode. Fish in a barrel? Aquarium mode!

Is this feature useful? Sure it is, you'll generally get somewhat better pictures that way. But the point is that these modes don't do any magic - they just change a setting or two to get a certain result. This isn't anything you can't do yourself, but it sure is more convenient as the camera changes all those settings at once. But at a certain point, all this gets redundant. The scene modes that actually do something have been in all cameras for years. What the cameras now do is offer an ever expanding list of ultra-specific situations, most of which don't do anything different than others. For example, the Pet setting on most cameras does the EXACT same thing as the Portrait mode, and the Fireworks mode does the same thing as Night Landscape. It won't take long until your camera will have a "3 Friends Having Picnic at High Noon at the Lakeshore" mode, with separate scene modes whether the picnic consists of cheese and wine or sandwiches and watermelon, if it's on a blanket or on the grass, and whether these friends are men, women, or both. All of which do the exact same thing, mind you, but hey, my camera has 188 scene modes versus your puny 150! :o

Batteries - Most cameras use lithium-ion batteries, which are tiny, last long, and weigh almost nothing. The disadvantage is that they're expensive ($25-50 for most), and that if it dies, you now have a very expensive paperweight. Personally I suggest you always carry a spare battery, you won't regret it.

Some cameras use AA batteries, which also have their advantages and disadvantages. They doesn't last as long and are heavier, but on the other hand if they die you could get a fresh pair anywhere in the world for two bucks.
_________

So there you have it - all about the important camera specs. The next lesson will be a short discussion about when or why you should or shouldn't upgrade your camera / buy the latest model, then on to a short discussion about lenses. After that we'll get into how to take better pictures - composition ,exposure, etc.


_________
Lesson Summary:

Sensor size:
- The bigger the better
- Usually, sensor size goes up with camera type
- Bigger sensors allow better pictures and out of focus backgrounds.
Lens:
- Wide angle is usually more important than telephoto.
- Longer zooms are quite convenient, but shorter ones usually have better image quality.
- The larger your aperture (the lower the f-stop number), the more light and the more out of focus the background can get.
Video:
- Higher resolution is better
- 30 fps is usually best, but 60 and higher has its uses.
- Progressive is better than Interlaced.
- H.264 and AVI formats are generally easier to work with than AVCHD.
RAW:
- Gives you full control over finishing the picture.
- Takes up lots of space, slows the camera down, and requires editing of each and every picture.
- Still a useful feature to have and use.
Burst Mode:
- Extremely useful. The more fps the better.
Viewfinder:
- Let's you shoot easily in bright sunlight and helps to steady the camera.
- An EVF is the most versatile.
- A TTL OVF is the most accurate.
- A tunnel-style OVF is still better than nothing.
Scene Modes:
- Useful, but irrelevant at this point. Every camera has all scenes you'd ever need.
Batteries:
- Li-ion is more powerful and lasts longer, but is more expensive.
- AAs don't last as long, but could be gotten anywhere for cheap.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on May 12, 2013, 06:44:36 AM
wow! thats  lot of info to take in
thanks for your time ( now i see what took so long..)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Shreknit on May 12, 2013, 08:30:45 AM
Thank you so much.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yehuda S on May 12, 2013, 01:13:28 PM
Thank you for all this info. Now I need to reread it several times!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Cholentfresser on May 12, 2013, 01:43:04 PM
Thank you for all this info. Now I need to reread it several times!
+1 I'm gonna have to read that again. and then again.
Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Twin on May 12, 2013, 02:36:45 PM
Wow that's a ton. I learnt so many new things already.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on May 12, 2013, 03:54:04 PM
Great writing! To be honest, I was sure I wouldn't last too long reading but you have the amazing talent of making things interesting without sacrificing the 'boring' details.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on May 12, 2013, 05:40:34 PM
What's in YOUR kit? (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28679.0)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 12, 2013, 06:02:48 PM
What's in YOUR kit? (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28679.0)

This (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28679.msg491829#msg491829)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SamKey on May 12, 2013, 07:02:18 PM
Thank You so much! I think it will take a couple of days until my head stops spinning to read it again
One question I just bought the Nikon Coolpix s9300 (BTW the little I can see its the best I've ever had especially considering th $100 I spent on it) I can't seem to figure out what sensor it uses can you let me know?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 12, 2013, 07:15:06 PM
Thank You so much! I think it will take a couple of days until my head stops spinning to read it again
One question I just bought the Nikon Coolpix s9300 (BTW the little I can see its the best I've ever had especially considering th $100 I spent on it) I can't seem to figure out what sensor it uses can you let me know?

1/2.3" CMOS.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on May 12, 2013, 07:16:43 PM
1/2.3" CMOS.
that the same as saying f/2.3?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 12, 2013, 07:24:03 PM
that the same as saying f/2.3?

No, the 1/2.3" refers to the physical size in his camera (that works out to about 0.43" diagonal). F/2.3 would refer to a lens aperture, which is the size of the lens opening. In this case the f/2.3 doesn't refer to any physical size; it's the result of some complex math of the opening relative to the sensor size.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SamKey on May 13, 2013, 03:51:06 AM
1/2.3" CMOS.
and if I may ask what is your opinion of the camera in general in regards to PandS
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: why on May 22, 2013, 10:37:58 PM
thanks so much im actually starting to know how to use my d5100.... whens the next lesson coming out!?!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 12:34:36 PM
How do i take good sunset pictures. I have an option on my d5100 for sunset. Its great. But i would like to take the sunset with the sund and the colors but i want to have the blue sky ontop. Te sky sometimes is so blue is amazing yet when i try either the sun gets to white to compensate for the Blue or the blue gets to dark to compensate for the sunset.
Does this make any sense? ☺
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on May 27, 2013, 02:36:17 PM
How do i take good sunset pictures. I have an option on my d5100 for sunset. Its great. But i would like to take the sunset with the sund and the colors but i want to have the blue sky ontop. Te sky sometimes is so blue is amazing yet when i try either the sun gets to white to compensate for the Blue or the blue gets to dark to compensate for the sunset.
Does this make any sense? ☺
That's because your camera does not have enough dynamic range to properly expose both the dark sky and bright sun in the same exposure.
You can either take 2 different exposures and blend them together or use a Graduated Neutral Density filter. (http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-Graduated-Neutral-Density-Filter/dp/B00004ZCFP/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1369679688&sr=8-2&keywords=graduated+neutral+density+filter)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SamKey on May 27, 2013, 02:57:19 PM
I don't want to be rude or impatient ... But I am! When is next lesson?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 27, 2013, 03:27:39 PM
I don't want to be rude or impatient ... But I am! When is next lesson?

D

Should be live by the end of the week. I may split it in two, it's turning out quite long...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 03:30:59 PM
That's because your camera does not have enough dynamic range to properly expose both the dark sky and bright sun in the same exposure.
You can either take 2 different exposures and blend them together or use a Graduated Neutral Density filter. (http://www.amazon.com/Tiffen-Graduated-Neutral-Density-Filter/dp/B00004ZCFP/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1369679688&sr=8-2&keywords=graduated+neutral+density+filter)
So for example ony d5100 what two settings would get the blue and the sunset?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on May 27, 2013, 03:57:08 PM
So for example ony d5100 what two settings would get the blue and the sunset?
I'm not familiar with Nikon. Maybe Something Fishy can chime in.
Blending 2 exposures is better accomplished in PP anyways.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 27, 2013, 04:15:22 PM
I'm not familiar with Nikon. Maybe Something Fishy can chime in.
Blending 2 exposures is better accomplished in PP anyways.

Far to busy at work now. I'll chime later.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 04:16:14 PM
I'm not familiar with Nikon. Maybe Something Fishy can chime in.
Blending 2 exposures is better accomplished in PP anyways.
i can do it on 'apeture' the program. I meant the settings. I take one pic on sunset. What would the other?


Thanks so much!!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on May 27, 2013, 04:19:59 PM
i can do it on 'apeture' the program. I meant the settings. I take one pic on sunset. What would the other?


Thanks so much!!!
You take one pic that exposes the sun properly and another that exposes the sky properly.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 04:21:49 PM
You take one pic that exposes the sun properly and another that exposes the sky properly.
lol. Got that. I mean i have no idea what exposure is good for the sky when the sun is so bright. I will post my two pics u was able to get.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on May 27, 2013, 04:44:25 PM
lol. Got that. I mean i have no idea what exposure is good for the sky when the sun is so bright. I will post my two pics u was able to get.
Expose so that the sky looks nice even if the sun is all blown out and expose again so that the sun looks nice even though the sky is too dark. Eyeball it. That's how you'll know.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 04:53:49 PM
http://imageshack.us/g/1/10167513/ (http://imageshack.us/g/1/10167513/)

here are my pics i took as the sun was setting. i was rushed so hopefully tom night ill set up shop from my roof and not from my window
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 27, 2013, 05:00:24 PM
No time to go into details at the moment, but for now I'll just say that it's a white balance issue which could be fixed by shooting RAW and blending two versions of the same picture.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on May 27, 2013, 05:03:09 PM
http://imageshack.us/g/1/10167513/ (http://imageshack.us/g/1/10167513/)

here are my pics i took as the sun was setting. i was rushed so hopefully tom night ill set up shop from my roof and not from my window
Cool. You need to take the pictures with the camera in the exact same position so you can align the images properly later.
Where is that picture btw?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 05:10:53 PM
No time to go into details at the moment, but for now I'll just say that it's a white balance issue which could be fixed by shooting RAW and blending two versions of the same picture.
@something fishy why u working today is memorial day? lol jk sorry! how much do you charge for an hr private course?
ok i think i know how to change the white balance. and i try to limit my RAW shots bec then i end up with, like u said, 20k non edited shots. (im upto 1k by now :-)

@jaywhy my apartment window machal 2, jerusalem Israel. and i know thats why im trying to get a key for the roof so i can take nice pics of the exact same place.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 27, 2013, 05:38:07 PM
@something fishy why u working today is memorial day?

Ha! Tell that to my boss.

how much do you charge for an hr private course?

Nothing for you, just provide transportation ;D ;D ;D.

ok i think i know how to change the white balance. and i try to limit my RAW shots bec then i end up with, like u said, 20k non edited shots. (im upto 1k by now :-)

True, but sometimes it's worth it. Jaywhy's idea would work too, but you'll still have to edit them, not to mention that you'll have two files to deal with now.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 27, 2013, 05:58:50 PM
Ha! Tell that to my boss.

Nothing for you, just provide transportation ;D ;D ;D.

True, but sometimes it's worth it. Jaywhy's idea would work too, but you'll still have to edit them, not to mention that you'll have two files to deal with now.
ill pay for the taxi from BG to my apt :-) ill even pick you up! :D

right, jaywhys idea is ok for me bec i hae all these photo editing programs (the basics) bec my wife does graphics, so she uses them here and there.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on June 03, 2013, 05:06:26 PM
a few shots from my newest photoshoot from my roof

http://imageshack.us/g/1/10178235/

i would love to hear opinions. i am but a young grasshoper when it comes to photography
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on June 03, 2013, 07:25:58 PM
a few shots from my newest photoshoot from my roof

http://imageshack.us/g/1/10178235/

i would love to hear opinions. i am but a young grasshoper when it comes to photography
I played around with one of your photos in Lightroom for a minute. I tried to bring back some of the lost shadow detail underneath the setting sun.  http://imgur.com/7awzTiL (http://imgur.com/7awzTiL)
Shooting in raw will enable you to bring back most of the detail from the same exposure. Or you can try merging two exposures.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 04, 2013, 12:03:18 AM
Sorry everyone for the long delay between lessons - I'm planning a big trip and it's taking up most of my time. I promise there'll be another class up very soon ;D.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on June 04, 2013, 12:09:49 AM
Sorry everyone for the long delay between lessons - I'm planning a big trip and it's taking up most of my time. I promise there'll be another class up very soon ;D.
Where are you going ?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on June 04, 2013, 12:11:45 AM
Sorry everyone for the long delay between lessons - I'm planning a big trip and it's taking up most of my time. I promise there'll be another class up very soon ;D.
ummmm. You think u can take a trip with out asking us ddfers if its ok? Or even where to go ?! :D :D eNjoy!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 04, 2013, 12:19:01 AM
ummmm. You think u can take a trip with out asking us ddfers if its ok? Or even where to go ?! :D :D eNjoy!!

How dare you accuse me of not getting DDF'ers help planning a trip - have you no shame???!!! 10 pages of planning, starting here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=3395.msg483749#msg483749)... :D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 04, 2013, 12:21:22 AM
Where are you going ?

Alaska - yippee!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 04, 2013, 12:25:17 AM
a few shots from my newest photoshoot from my roof

http://imageshack.us/g/1/10178235/

i would love to hear opinions. i am but a young grasshoper when it comes to photography

You asked for it - these pictures are perfect fodder for the "What makes a compelling photograph?" lesson. I daresay you'll have opinion overload when I'm through with you ;).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on June 04, 2013, 02:13:14 AM
How dare you accuse me of not getting DDF'ers help planning a trip - have you no shame???!!! 10 pages of planning, starting here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=3395.msg483749#msg483749)... :D
lol.  Kol hakavod!!! That's amazing! I will read up so i can expect a nice tr when ur finished.

And im all game. You fall once get up twice. I like to learn and know my mistakes. Hence why i asked YOUR opinion. :D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on June 04, 2013, 06:42:03 AM
while were waiting for the next lesson, might i recommend taking a look at tom langfords articles on jpost.com . i actually took a lesson from him
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SamKey on June 12, 2013, 07:00:06 AM
How's Alaska?  8)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: bem684 on June 12, 2013, 08:51:53 AM
Alaska - yippee!

Awesome :)  I was just looking into RVing the Dalton Highway for next year  ;D  Then taking one  of the organized tours up to Prudhoe Bay and the north coast.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on June 13, 2013, 03:24:17 PM
How's about this upcoming beast?  Will probably be mad expensive with the android OS but still...
http://www.droid-life.com/2013/06/13/here-are-the-first-pictures-of-samsungs-galaxy-nx/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lfas25 on June 13, 2013, 08:52:28 PM
Is this actually a decent deal / camera?

http://www.nomorerack.com/daily_deals/view/398296-nikon_d3100_slr_camera___vr_zoom_lens_kit
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on June 13, 2013, 09:28:26 PM
How's about this upcoming beast?  Will probably be mad expensive with the android OS but still...
http://www.droid-life.com/2013/06/13/here-are-the-first-pictures-of-samsungs-galaxy-nx/
Is this actually a decent deal / camera?

http://www.nomorerack.com/daily_deals/view/398296-nikon_d3100_slr_camera___vr_zoom_lens_kit
Shouldn't this go here? (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lfas25 on June 13, 2013, 09:42:52 PM
Shouldn't this go here?
 (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0)

Oops I never noticed that thread
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 13, 2013, 09:48:07 PM
Is this actually a decent deal / camera?

http://www.nomorerack.com/daily_deals/view/398296-nikon_d3100_slr_camera___vr_zoom_lens_kit

Great camera, horrible deal. Besides the camera and the 55-200 lens, everything in the "kit" is worthless c**p. The tripod won't hold the camera steady, the so-called wide angle and 2x "lenses" will kill the real lenses, etc. etc.

Rather get this (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/736704-REG/Nikon_9798_D3100_Digital_SLR_Camera.html) from B&H for a hundred bucks less.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lfas25 on July 11, 2013, 02:11:36 PM
Do you think this is worth it?

http://www.groupon.com/deals/photo-art-studio-10?p=2&utm_source=pc-occasions&utm_medium=email&sid=4fe80025-412f-4dba-aa45-19f2d6cd701e&division=central-jersey&user=a0bb53737dc267ef7ebfc6f479bf5ee351898201880e62a123d1a65dcb664479&date=20130711&s=body&c=image&d=occasions_deal
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on July 12, 2013, 04:38:22 PM
http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2013/06/18/reviewed-mirrorless-cameras/2431125/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on July 12, 2013, 04:45:05 PM
Learn Photography, Android Style. (https://play.google.com/store/books/collection/promotion_10004b8_android_photography?feature=banner)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on July 12, 2013, 07:52:11 PM
Coming from someone who's only used Automatic on my P&S the past 13 years.

Where does something like a Sony rx100, (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00889ST2G/?tag=cl03f-20) rx100m (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DGQK2GM/?tag=cl03f-20), or Canon S110  (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009B0MYSQ/?tag=cl03f-20)fit into the P&S vs. Mirrorless camera like the Sony Nex5r  (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0090QXG92/?tag=cl03f-20)or Nex6 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1OKS/?tag=cl03f-20)?.

What makes them cost so much more than a P&S and how are they worse than mirrorless? I get that mirrorless has interchangeable lenses but I just can't see myself lugging around extra lenses...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 13, 2013, 10:23:50 PM
Coming from someone who's only used Automatic on my P&S the past 13 years.

Where does something like a Sony rx100, (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00889ST2G/?tag=cl03f-20) rx100m (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00DGQK2GM/?tag=cl03f-20), or Canon S110  (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B009B0MYSQ/?tag=cl03f-20)fit into the P&S vs. Mirrorless camera like the Sony Nex5r  (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0090QXG92/?tag=cl03f-20)or Nex6 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1OKS/?tag=cl03f-20)?.

What makes them cost so much more than a P&S and how are they worse than mirrorless? I get that mirrorless has interchangeable lenses but I just can't see myself lugging around extra lenses...

Quite simple:

S110: Typical P&S with slightly larger sensor and more manual control. This means somewhat better pictures than a full auto regular camera, but still not 'pro' level by any means (no out of focus backgrounds, etc.). Focus and shutter lag as slow as any other P&S.
RX100: Pretty new class of camera - huge 1" sensor (relative to compacts), but still a relatively simple camera - no interchangeable lenses etc. Advantages: much better image quality (IQ), and an awesome fast lens. Smaller than mirrorless, but not much. Some out of focus backgrounds, but not much at all. Disadvantages: still not close in IQ to a mirrorless (by far) but costs he same. Limited to one lens. Focus and shutter lag are a bit faster, but still agonizingly slow.
RX100m: Same camera, but with the low pass filter removed. Marginally sharper pictures, but more susceptible to moire (https://support.nikonusa.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/9544/~/what-is-moir%E3%A9%3F). You could safely ignore this camera.
Mirrorless: Amazing IQ. Fully pro results. A million lenses to choose from (even if you don't want to carry any, just wait till you try a fast prime. You'll take it everywhere - it's small and light). Cheaper upgrade path (you already have lenses, now you only need a new body). Not too expensive. Most importantly, zero shutter lag and instant focusing. No missing pictures of your kid anymore.

The basic idea is that a mirrorless is a DSLR in a tiny body is just about every way, while the others are simply better point & shoots.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 13, 2013, 10:28:09 PM
I forgot to answer one question - the reason for the higher cost of the advanced P&Ss is basically the engineering of putting the high quality components into a small package. The reason the RX100 costs more than some mirrorless cameras is due to using a fast lens together with a relatively large sensor. It's extremely difficult to pull this off without getting into horrible optical issues (chromatic aberrations, vignetting, color fringing, distortion, etc.).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on July 13, 2013, 10:47:00 PM
What's a fast prime lens?

Can we expect another lesson?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 13, 2013, 11:12:33 PM
What's a fast prime lens?

A non-zooming lens with an aperture larger f/2.8 or larger (f/2, 1.8, 1.4, etc.). They're generally the sharpest lenses and render beautiful out of focus backgrounds.

This picture is something that could not really have been done without a one (in this case the Nikon 85mm f/1.8 ):
(http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/9268/p4z6.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/196/p4z6.jpg/)

Can we expect another lesson?

You could expect all of them. I was tied up with my Alaskan trip for a while, as soon as my trip report is done it's back to these lessons.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on July 13, 2013, 11:13:50 PM
A non-zooming lens with an aperture larger f/2.8 or larger (f/2, 1.8, 1.4, etc.). They're generally the sharpest lenses and render beautiful out of focus backgrounds.

This picture is something that could not really have been done without a one (in this case the Nikon 85mm f/1.8 ):
(http://img196.imageshack.us/img196/9268/p4z6.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/196/p4z6.jpg/)

You could expect all of them. I was tied up with my Alaskan trip for a while, as soon as my trip report is done it's back to these lessons.
Awesome. Looking forward

Take your time. You're providing a free service. Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: smurf on July 13, 2013, 11:26:41 PM
wow! besides for how informative the lessons are, they are also great reads.
"Shooting fish in a barrel" alol
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on July 13, 2013, 11:48:30 PM
Thanks fishy!

So Sony Nex5r (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0090QXG92/?tag=cl03f-20) vs Sony Nex6 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1OKS/?tag=cl03f-20).  Got to play with both and am terribly torn.  Both take stunning pictures and are considered to be the best in the mirrorless market but neither is perfect :(

Nex5r Advantages: Lower price ($498 body/$598 with lens). Touchscreen which seems awesome for telling the camera exactly where to focus, touch where you want and a picture will be taken with the focus on where you touched
Nex5r Cons: No built in flash or viewfinder. Very large 18-55 lens mount (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003U8Q7TC/?tag=cl03f-20). No physical switch to change shooting mode.

Nex6 Advantages: Small 16-50 lens mount (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1PG6/?tag=cl03f-20) means this can actually be pocketable. Power zoom. Viewfinder means you can use this camera better in sunlight. Physical switch to change shooting mode.
Nex6 Cons: Higher price ($748 body/$898 with lens). No touchscreen.

I'm sure there are many more pros and cons but these are what I noticed.  The huge included lens on the 5r can be remedied of course by buying the lens separately  (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1PG6/?tag=cl03f-20)though that will bump up the price to Nex6 levels.  Buying an external flash (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005D6C14Y/?tag=cl03f-20)+power lens for the 5r will make it way more than the Nex6 and you still won't have the viewfinder.

The Nex6 seems awesome except for the exclusion of a touchscreen.  To get the camera to focus on something specific seems quite tedious compared to just touching the screen on the 5r.

Any ideas when updates for these are expected?  Think a 6 will come out with a touchscreen?
Any other factors I'm missing between the 2 cameras?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2013, 12:22:44 AM
Thanks fishy!

So Sony Nex5r (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0090QXG92/?tag=cl03f-20) vs Sony Nex6 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1OKS/?tag=cl03f-20).  Got to play with both and am terribly torn.  Both take stunning pictures and are considered to be the best in the mirrorless market but neither is perfect :(

Nex5r Advantages: Lower price ($498 body/$598 with lens). Touchscreen which seems awesome for telling the camera exactly where to focus, touch where you want and a picture will be taken with the focus on where you touched
Nex5r Cons: No built in flash or viewfinder. Very large 18-55 lens mount (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B003U8Q7TC/?tag=cl03f-20). No physical switch to change shooting mode.

Nex6 Advantages: Small 16-50 lens mount (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1PG6/?tag=cl03f-20) means this can actually be pocketable. Power zoom. Viewfinder means you can use this camera better in sunlight. Physical switch to change shooting mode.
Nex6 Cons: Higher price ($748 body/$898 with lens). No touchscreen.

I'm sure there are many more pros and cons but these are what I noticed.  The huge included lens on the 5r can be remedied of course by buying the lens separately  (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0096W1PG6/?tag=cl03f-20)though that will bump up the price to Nex6 levels.  Buying an external flash (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B005D6C14Y/?tag=cl03f-20)+power lens for the 5r will make it way more than the Nex6 and you still won't have the viewfinder.

The Nex6 seems awesome except for the exclusion of a touchscreen.  To get the camera to focus on something specific seems quite tedious compared to just touching the screen on the 5r.

Any ideas when updates for these are expected?  Think a 6 will come out with a touchscreen?
Any other factors I'm missing between the 2 cameras?

While the 5r doesn't have a built-in flash, it does include an external flash. It folds down and hardly takes up any space; I keep mine on the camera all the time and I never even notice it. Mind you once you'll see the image quality of that camera in low light you'll never use the flash anyway. I've taken thousands upon thousands of pictures with my 5n and maybe 50 of those with flash.
(http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NEX5/ZFLASHREAR.JPG)

As far as the lens, the 16-50 isn't quite as pocketable as you'd expect; mounted on the camera the thickness is 2.16". I don't see how this'll fit in a pocket. There are also some issues with this lens that you have to keep in mind - the quality isn't as good as the 18-55, and there is lots of distortion on the 16mm end. Also, since it's a power lens, every time you turn on or wake up the camera the lens has to extend; this means that for about 2 seconds the camera is inoperable, making you potentially miss the shot.

The 18-55 on the other hand, being mechanical, has no startup issues. From when I wake up my camera (I always keep it on, so a tap on the shutter is all I need for it to get going), till I could take a picture is about a quarter of a second, if that. It's also sharper and has no distortion. Also, since it's mechanical, I could zoom much faster just by giving the lens a twist. And size-wise, it's only 1.18" bigger than the 16-50. Not so much I think, especially like I said the 16-50 doesn't really fit in a pocket either.

The touchscreen is absolutely amazing and IMO one of the best features of the cameras. Just tap a face for example and the camera will track it in all directions so that it's always in focus, no matter how wild the kid is ;). This is also amazing for video.

I think the only real reason for someone like you to get the 6 is for the viewfinder. It's extremely useful for outdoor shooting, but I don't think it's reason enough to go with the 6 over the 5r. And hey, Sony'll happily sell you a viewfinder for $240 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/819651-REG/Sony_FDA_EV1S_Electronic_Viewfinder_for_NEX_5N.html) if you're that desperate ;D.

As far as new ones coming out, the only NEX really due for an upgrade is the 7, so I don't think we'll see a 5r/6 update in the near future.


Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on July 14, 2013, 04:43:29 AM
How's Alaska?  You available for a course over succos. Or before it after?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on July 14, 2013, 07:26:09 AM
How's Alaska?  You available for a course over succos. Or before it after?

Course DO?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on July 14, 2013, 09:55:03 AM
http://www.buydig.com/mobile/product.aspx?sdtid=6148866&sku=tm18200xrdieos&omid=200&ref=cj

Is this 1. A good deal? 2. Compatible with lumix gx1
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2013, 01:31:06 PM
How's Alaska?

Awesome. TR in the works.

You available for a course over succos. Or before it after?
Course DO?

Interesting idea. It's a bit far out, but it may just work.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2013, 01:31:39 PM
http://www.buydig.com/mobile/product.aspx?sdtid=6148866&sku=tm18200xrdieos&omid=200&ref=cj

Is this 1. A good deal? 2. Compatible with lumix gx1

1. Not really (it's a cr***y lens).
2. No (it's for Canon).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on July 14, 2013, 01:36:26 PM
Awesome. TR in the works.

Interesting idea. It's a bit far out, but it may just work.
so happy about alaska!

also im game for a small DO/ lesson!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on July 16, 2013, 03:05:05 PM
I think the only real reason for someone like you to get the 6 is for the viewfinder. It's extremely useful for outdoor shooting, but I don't think it's reason enough to go with the 6 over the 5r. And hey, Sony'll happily sell you a viewfinder for $240 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/819651-REG/Sony_FDA_EV1S_Electronic_Viewfinder_for_NEX_5N.html) if you're that desperate ;D.

As far as new ones coming out, the only NEX really due for an upgrade is the 7, so I don't think we'll see a 5r/6 update in the near future.
Tried out the Nex-6.  It is pocketable with the power zoom lens if you're wearing khakis, so that's a big difference for me.
It's also on sale on Amazon now for $798 with the lens, so $200 price difference (instead of the $300 difference from yesterday) for the viewfinder+internal flash+smaller size but losing the touchscreen.  The startup difference between the 2 to start taking pictures was less than half a second.

If they put the touchscreen on the 6 this would be an easy decision :P

The telephoto lens is $100 off with the 5 or 6 at the time of purchase.
But I am ever going to use it?

Time for a camera lesson DO!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on July 16, 2013, 03:09:06 PM
Tried out the Nex-6.  It is pocketable with the power zoom lens if you're wearing khakis, so that's a big difference for me.
It's also on sale on Amazon now for $798 with the lens, so $200 price difference (instead of the $300 difference from yesterday) for the viewfinder+internal flash+smaller size but losing the touchscreen.  The startup difference between the 2 to start taking pictures was less than half a second.

If they put the touchscreen on the 6 this would be an easy decision :P

The telephoto lens is $100 off with the 5 or 6 at the time of purchase.
But I am ever going to use it?

Time for a camera lesson DO!

One of the benefits of the mirrorless camera and buying the Sony Nex is having tutorials and tips built right into the camera. Plus it has the ease of point and shoot features as well.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on July 16, 2013, 03:15:02 PM

Time for a camera lesson DO!
they have camera classes all the time on groupon. its definitely worthwhile to attend one or two
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on July 16, 2013, 07:52:46 PM
they have camera classes all the time on groupon. its definitely worthwhile to attend one or two
but i would like to give something fishy the biz.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 06, 2013, 01:41:39 PM
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=31292.msg559054.msg#559054
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Lou Bob on August 23, 2013, 12:35:55 AM
Idk how to work this from phone.....but....
I took this pic in san juan,PR @sunrise using Samsung galaxy s2
Thoughts?

 http://imageshack.us/photo/photo/541/4hxi.jpg/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 23, 2013, 12:54:01 AM
Idk how to work this from phone.....but....
I took this pic in san juan,PR @sunrise using Samsung galaxy s2
Thoughts?

 http://imageshack.us/photo/photo/541/4hxi.jpg/

Here's the shot, embedded:
(http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/6951/xjca.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/707/xjca.jpg/)


I like it. I like the color, the mood, and the fact that I'd much rather be there than here right now. Silhouettes are much harder to pull off properly than most people think, but this one works extremely well.

As far as composition, it's pretty good, with my only real issue being the bottom - a good quarter of the picture is taken up by black nothingness. I think cropping most of it away would help a lot - the picture will be wider, adding to the feeling of space and freedom. This will also move the horizon line down to the lower third of the picture, making it far more engaging. A wider crop will also accentuate the beautiful curve of the water - the viewer's eye would start at the lower left, travel along the beach to the right, and then follow the far beach all the way back to the left. This is called a leading line, and is something with you pulled off perfectly here.

I'd also clone out the person all the way on the right, as well as the two white lines next to him. Both are distracting and only take away from the image.

Here's a two minute edit I made, incorporating some of those changes:

(http://img835.imageshack.us/img835/7996/4jgb.jpg) (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/835/4jgb.jpg/)

Overall I'd say this is a lovely, well executed shot.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: gunit770 on September 04, 2013, 06:16:02 AM
While the 5r doesn't have a built-in flash, it does include an external flash. It folds down and hardly takes up any space; I keep mine on the camera all the time and I never even notice it. Mind you once you'll see the image quality of that camera in low light you'll never use the flash anyway. I've taken thousands upon thousands of pictures with my 5n and maybe 50 of those with flash.
(http://www.imaging-resource.com/PRODS/NEX5/ZFLASHREAR.JPG)

As far as the lens, the 16-50 isn't quite as pocketable as you'd expect; mounted on the camera the thickness is 2.16". I don't see how this'll fit in a pocket. There are also some issues with this lens that you have to keep in mind - the quality isn't as good as the 18-55, and there is lots of distortion on the 16mm end. Also, since it's a power lens, every time you turn on or wake up the camera the lens has to extend; this means that for about 2 seconds the camera is inoperable, making you potentially miss the shot.

The 18-55 on the other hand, being mechanical, has no startup issues. From when I wake up my camera (I always keep it on, so a tap on the shutter is all I need for it to get going), till I could take a picture is about a quarter of a second, if that. It's also sharper and has no distortion. Also, since it's mechanical, I could zoom much faster just by giving the lens a twist. And size-wise, it's only 1.18" bigger than the 16-50. Not so much I think, especially like I said the 16-50 doesn't really fit in a pocket either.

The touchscreen is absolutely amazing and IMO one of the best features of the cameras. Just tap a face for example and the camera will track it in all directions so that it's always in focus, no matter how wild the kid is ;). This is also amazing for video.

I think the only real reason for someone like you to get the 6 is for the viewfinder. It's extremely useful for outdoor shooting, but I don't think it's reason enough to go with the 6 over the 5r. And hey, Sony'll happily sell you a viewfinder for $240 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/819651-REG/Sony_FDA_EV1S_Electronic_Viewfinder_for_NEX_5N.html) if you're that desperate ;D.

As far as new ones coming out, the only NEX really due for an upgrade is the 7, so I don't think we'll see a 5r/6 update in the near future.

I believe there is a new version of the 5r coming out september 8th labeled the NEX-5TL. Any opinions on the new one Fishy?

Also, the 5r can now be had for $450 on amazon and best buy with the 18-55mm lens. I am assuming thats a good deal but would love a second opinion on that.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 07:59:35 AM
I believe there is a new version of the 5r coming out september 8th labeled the NEX-5TL. Any opinions on the new one Fishy?

Also, the 5r can now be had for $450 on amazon and best buy with the 18-55mm lens. I am assuming thats a good deal but would love a second opinion on that.

So far everything we know about the new one is from rumors, but it seems like it'll be a pretty minor upgrade, so the old is is probably the better deal.

The 5r and lens for $450 is a steal, go for it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yeki89 on September 04, 2013, 08:35:44 AM
em, can we move on to the next lesson? Please?

Is this a good Lighting set?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160972138510
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 08:47:30 AM
em, can we move on to the next lesson? Please?

After the yumim tovim iy"h.

Is this a good Lighting set?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=160972138510

What'll you be shooting with it?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yeki89 on September 04, 2013, 10:23:03 AM
rebel XSi
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 10:41:06 AM
rebel XSi

I meant what's your subject - portraits, items for eBay, something else?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yeki89 on September 04, 2013, 11:16:17 AM
Both
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 12:10:00 PM
Both

Not a good choice then. For occasional ebay work with fairly small items you could get away with it for a bit. It won't work for portraits at all though (far too weak, bad color, etc.etc.).

In any case, it's a piece of junk quality wise. It'll break after a short while (the stud on the lightstands for example will break off very quickly). A kit of this size should cost $120-$150 at least if it's decent quality.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 12:21:37 PM
And for the record - this is what I do for a living. I'm a product designer/developer making studio and portable lighting. I've made many variations of this kind of kit (example (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/298604-REG/Impact_401470_Three_Light_Mini_Boom_Kit.html) and example (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/945063-REG/impact_soft_n_natural_4_sockets.html)), so I know a thing or two about 'em :P.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on September 04, 2013, 12:36:46 PM
And for the record - this is what I do for a living. I'm a product designer/developer making studio and portable lighting. I've made many variations of this kind of kit (example (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/298604-REG/Impact_401470_Three_Light_Mini_Boom_Kit.html) and example (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/945063-REG/impact_soft_n_natural_4_sockets.html)), so I know a thing or two about 'em :P.
Better money in that than being a professional photographer?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 01:24:31 PM
For sure. For one, it's a highly specialized job vs. a market where everyone and their mother becomes a "professional photographer". Photography has become a very tough market in the last in the last few years - the supply of photographers has skyrocketed, while the perceived value if their work has plummeted. It's simply not worth it for me to go full-time pro at this point of time.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on September 04, 2013, 02:00:27 PM
True, though the good ones still command (and get) a small fortune.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 02:22:09 PM
Of course, but until you get to that point...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on September 04, 2013, 02:29:12 PM
Based on your pics I doubt it would take you too long!

I'd have hired you for my wedding in a blink of an eye, most of our pictures are mediocre.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 04, 2013, 05:37:32 PM
Based on your pics I doubt it would take you too long!

I'd have hired you for my wedding in a blink of an eye, most of our pictures are mediocre.

That's some compliment ^-^. I don't know what to say ;D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: gunit770 on September 04, 2013, 05:47:42 PM
So far everything we know about the new one is from rumors, but it seems like it'll be a pretty minor upgrade, so the old is is probably the better deal.

The 5r and lens for $450 is a steal, go for it.

Just purchased and on its way. Going to play around with it after RH. My budget for my first foray into the non-P&S world was $700 so I'm definitely happy I was able to stay well below that. Thanks Fishy for all the advice and keep it coming!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on September 04, 2013, 05:56:21 PM
Just purchased and on its way. Going to play around with it after RH. My budget for my first foray into the non-P&S world was $700 so I'm definitely happy I was able to stay well below that. Thanks Fishy for all the advice and keep it coming!
Looks like a good deal, but the 6 was a lifesaver.

Would not have gotten half the pictures we had in Banff when it was sunny out without the amazing digital viewfinder that the 6 has.
And unlike the 5 it was able to fit into my pocket.
Plus indoor pics of food need the flash which is conveniently built in on the 6.

/.02
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 07, 2013, 07:34:53 PM
you should generally try to stay away from the built in flash
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 07, 2013, 08:57:03 PM
you should generally try to stay away from the built in flash

Sure, if you have a better choice. But sometimes you need flash, and then an on-camera flash is better than nothing.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on September 08, 2013, 01:16:08 AM
you should generally try to stay away from the built in flash
If you're taking pics of food indoors then you need the flash IMHO.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on September 08, 2013, 01:19:34 AM
If you're taking pics of food indoors then you need the flash IMHO.

With the nex 6? I'd imagine you can get by without the flash in many indoor situations, no?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on September 08, 2013, 01:31:37 AM
With the nex 6? I'd imagine you can get by without the flash in many indoor situations, no?
Depends on ambient lighting, etc.
But from our Banff hotel room without and with flash:
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on September 08, 2013, 02:12:21 AM
Sure, if you have a better choice. But sometimes you need flash, and then an on-camera flash is better than nothing.
Is there a diffuser for the built in flash?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 08, 2013, 02:19:13 AM
Is there a diffuser for the built in flash?
most new cameras have the option
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 02:22:36 AM
There are two things involved in the use of flash - quantity and quality of the light.

You're saying that sometimes you need more quantity of light - it's simply too dark. Sky121's got a valid point too - if you raise the ISO on the Nex6 you could get some pretty high quality shots without using the flash at all. What neither of you are addressing is the quality of the light, which is far more important than the quantity.

Moish on the other hand is talking only about the quality, not quantity, so his point is correct too.

This discussion could cover a few full length lessons (and it iy"h will eventually), but the main idea is that while you may have a picture that has the right amount of light, said light may not be very pretty.

Look at the two pictures in your post above - while the second one now has the correct amount of light, at the end of the day the pictures aren't too pretty. They get the point across, of course - "here's what we ate, this is what it looked like", but if you'd pay attention to the quality of light the pictures could be some much better. For example, compare these two pictures (both from your Banff TR):

(http://www.dansdeals.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/DSC00646a.jpg)

A plate of food, carpet bombed with light - direct, straight-on, point-blank harsh light.

(http://www.dansdeals.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/DSC00634a.jpg)

Look at the fruit plate here, and notice the difference. The light is not coming from the front, but rather from the upper left. It's coming from a fairly large source (probably a fluorescent fixture), from a good couple of feet away. The end result is a much prettier light. Look how the fruits have dimensionality to them - every grape is distinct, each with it's own highlight and shadow; look at the soft shadows on the orange, slowly fading from light to dark. You could see every seed on the strawberry, and ecen the plate has texture to it. Compare that to the top picture - everything is flat, you don't know where a piece of chicken ends and where the next one begins, and the plate is just blown-out white.

So what happened here? I'm sure you weren't thinking of any of this when you took these pictures. But the basics of light are at play here:

- The larger the light source, the softer the light. A big light fixture is far bigger, thus far prettier, than an on-camera flash.
- The further the light source, the softer the light. Again, the ceiling or vanity light is further than the on-camera one.
- Most importantly, the direction of the light dictates the direction of the shadows. The bigger light, being off to the side, casts everything on the opposite side in shadow, creating dimensionality. The softer the light (larger+further), the more gradual and soft the shadows will be (note the orange).

What this means is that 99% of the time an on-camera flash will give you the worst results of any other lighting technique. Of course sometimes you don't have any other choice - a flatly lit picture is still better than a dark picture (and the two pictures you put in your post are proof of that); but there's usually some things you could do anyway.

Not going into off-camera flash here; let's stick to the basics - you have a plate of food and only a built-in flash. How could you take a well-lit picture?

The simplest answer is not to use the flash at all, and instead use window light. Remember that we want the light to be as soft as possible - cloudy days are best, as are windows with indirect sunlight. The light will hit the plate at an angle, creating directional shadows. Since the light is already soft, these shadows will be soft automatically. Worried that the other side of the plate will be too dark? Pick up you menu and put it on the opposite side of the plate - it'll act as a reflector and bounce some light back onto the dark side to open up the shadows.

What if it's nighttime? First, you could still simulate window light (to a degree) with your phone or ipad: turn the brightness all the way up, get a white screen (a new internet tab usually does this), and hold it 2-3 feet away (further with an ipad). It's not as good as a real window, but it's usually better than straight on flash.

In the worst case, when you do have to use the on-camera flash, you wan't to make sure that the light is as soft as possible (nothing you could do about direction). All you really need is a white napkin. Hold it a few inches in front of the flash, and viola - instantly better pictures.

In summary - the on-camera flash should only be used when you really have no other choice, and even then you should always try to diffuse it as much as possible. However, it can't be denied that it's a very useful tool and worth paying for in a camera.

On a side note, there is one situation when the built-in camera really shines. Paradoxically, it is usually the last place someone would actually think of using it - in bright sunlight. How many times have you taken a picture of someone standing in front of a beautiful lake or beach, only to have the subject come out as a silhouette? Since the camera usually tries to expose for the entire scene, it'll underexpose the person, since they're such a small part of it. However, if you force your flash to fire, it'll deliver just enough light to brighten up the person, while not affecting anything else.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 02:27:11 AM
most new cameras have the option

No cameras have a diffuser option - the diffuser is an external part:
(http://static.bhphoto.com/images/images500x500/407175.jpg)

(http://static.bhphoto.com/images/images500x500/752425.jpg)

You're probably talking about lowering the flash power - this may help a drop, but the quality will usually be the same (just a little less bright).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yeki89 on September 08, 2013, 02:28:43 AM
u make me hungry!
beauty pic.

I assume raising the ISO is the trick in not having lighting equipment, and not wanting to use the flash.
What about the shutter speed?

How can I know which one to play with more?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 08, 2013, 02:36:13 AM
No cameras have a diffuser option - the diffuser is an external part:
(http://static.bhphoto.com/images/images500x500/407175.jpg)

(http://static.bhphoto.com/images/images500x500/752425.jpg)

You're probably talking about lowering the flash power - this may help a drop, but the quality will usually be the same (just a little less bright).
so what the option on my camera to lessen the amount of light the flash lets off? sorry if i mis informed ppl here... my bad
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 02:37:46 AM
I assume raising the ISO is the trick in not having lighting equipment, and not wanting to use the flash.
Not quite; high ISO is an exchange for using the built-in flash for light quantity, bit it won't do anything for quality. Nothing will replace probed lighting equipment, mainly for quality but also for quantity.

What about the shutter speed?
How can I know which one to play with more?
These questions are about the basics of exposure; I'll cover them in depth in the coming classes. For now let's just say that for every stop you raise your ISO (100 to 200, etc.) your shutter speed will be one stop faster (1/100 to 1/200). What to use depends on the situation. Usually you'd want the slowest shutter speed you could and not get blur, and keep the ISO low. If your shutter speed get's too slow then it's time to start raising your ISO.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 08, 2013, 02:40:02 AM

can we have that coming class maybe on thurs :D or monday after succot?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 02:41:40 AM
so what the option on my camera to lessen the amount of light the flash lets off? sorry if i mis informed ppl here... my bad

That's the flash power (called flash compensation on some cameras). Most DSLRs let you adjust it from -3 to +1 power in auto or program modes, and from 1/1 (full power) to 1/64 in manual modes (you could use a manual flash together with auto or program exposure modes usually).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 08, 2013, 03:52:55 AM
alternatively, gary fong makes a diffuser for slr built in flash
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 03:57:48 AM
alternatively, gary fong makes a diffuser for slr built in flash

Many people do, in all types of types and price ranges. Most of those work great (I've tested most of them and own a good 4-5 different types). And of course they're more convenient than a napkin :D.

But for some cameras (like the Nex 6), there's nothing commercial available, hence the napkin.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 08, 2013, 03:58:56 AM
Many people do, in all types of types and price ranges. Most of those work great (I've tested most of them and own a good 4-5 different types). And of course they're more convenient than a napkin :D.

But for some cameras (like the Nex 6), there's nothing commercial available, hence the napkin.
is there a problem with color correction?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 04:03:29 AM
is there a problem with color correction?

Not if you use a white napkin.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 08, 2013, 04:10:03 AM
Not if you use a white napkin.
how is that different than using a ping pong ball (which is a problem)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 04:11:50 AM
how is that different than using a ping pong ball (which is a problem)

Why would a ping pong ball be a problem?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 08, 2013, 04:14:51 AM
Why would a ping pong ball be a problem?
not color corrected
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 04:20:29 AM
not color corrected

If you're using a cut-up ping pong ball instead of a $10 accessory and are worried about minuscule color correction issues you're doing it wrong :P.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 08, 2013, 07:01:36 AM
If you're using a cut-up ping pong ball instead of a $10 accessory and are worried about minuscule color correction issues you're doing it wrong :P.
i was taking a photo class and someone suggested using a ping pong ball cut in half but the instructor told him not to since its not color corrected. i instead bought this

http://www.amazon.com/Gary-Fong-Diffuser-OLYMPUS-excluding/dp/B0011000R6/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1378637999&sr=8-4&keywords=gary+fong+diffuser
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on September 08, 2013, 08:39:22 AM
Many people do, in all types of types and price ranges. Most of those work great (I've tested most of them and own a good 4-5 different types). And of course they're more convenient than a napkin :D.

But for some cameras (like the Nex 6), there's nothing commercial available, hence the napkin.
That was my question, thanks.
If you're using a cut-up ping pong ball instead of a $10 accessory and are worried about minuscule color correction issues you're doing it wrong :P.
Couldn't you just set custom WB with a grey card to fix that?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 08, 2013, 12:06:11 PM
i was taking a photo class and someone suggested using a ping pong ball cut in half but the instructor told him not to since its not color corrected.

The instructor was covering his butt, he probably didn't want to run the chance of people complaining on the off chance that it'll have a color cast. I think people on this forum are smart enough to figure out that if they suddenly have greenish pictures after using a ping pong ball that the ball is to blame, and use something else.

Couldn't you just set custom WB with a grey card to fix that?

Sometimes, yes. But only when the flash is the only light in the picture, and only when the color cast is on the blue/yellow (cool/warm) axis. As soon as there is any other light in the scene, or if the cast is on the green/magenta axis, it becomes quite complicated.

But again, if you use a white ping pong ball or napkin the chance of introducing a color cast is nearly nil.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 08, 2013, 12:22:20 PM
The instructor was covering his butt, he probably didn't want to run the chance of people complaining on the off chance that it'll have a color cast. I think people on this forum are smart enough to figure out that if they suddenly have greenish pictures after using a ping pong ball that the ball is to blame, and use something else.

but they might not notice a small color distortion while taking the pictures, and the moment will be long gone by the time they realize

better to stay away
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on October 25, 2013, 02:30:46 AM
Bump. Any chance of reviving this thread at some point?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on October 25, 2013, 02:32:57 AM
Bump. Any chance of reviving this thread at some point?
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=23342
;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on October 25, 2013, 02:36:41 AM
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=23342
;)
Halevai
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 25, 2013, 08:32:25 AM
Bump. Any chance of reviving this thread at some point?

Don't give up on me just yet ;). There's lots more good stuff coming...

I've been crazy busy these last couple of months, I couldn't find enough time to devote to this. During the winter is always quieter, so expect frequent updates to commence very soon.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on October 25, 2013, 01:29:49 PM
Don't give up on me just yet ;). There's lots more good stuff coming...

I've been crazy busy these last couple of months, I couldn't find enough time to devote to this. During the winter is always quieter, so expect frequent updates to commence very soon.
Awesome. Looking forward. Happy with the camera I bought, especially since amex paid for it. But would love to use it to it's fullest
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on October 25, 2013, 03:07:15 PM
Happy with the camera I bought, especially since amex paid for it.

Return protection or 2'nd year warranty?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: notanonymous on October 25, 2013, 04:10:41 PM
I thought this might be a more appropiate place to post, rather than in in 'Deal Requests'...anyone know where I can find an inexpensive prime lense for a Pentax?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on October 25, 2013, 04:28:28 PM
Well, with Something Fishy's help, I've decided on the Nex 5r.

Bring on the next lesson!

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on October 25, 2013, 04:30:36 PM
I found the stunning digital viewfinder in the 6 to be worth every penny and then some. Would have missed many shots in Banff without it.

The much more compact lens and built in flash are big pluses in my book too.

I know SF disagrees though Lenticular is on my side :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on October 25, 2013, 04:43:28 PM
I can't imagine having to ever use the optical viewfinder. I almost never have an issue using my phone in broad daylight; I can't imagine this would be much different, if at all.

I also don't ever tend to use the flash. And even if I did, is it worth $2-300 extra for those things? Meh. (For that money I can basically buy myself a telephoto lens, too!)

And, despite what you may think, the 5r body is smaller.

111 x 59 x 39 mm (4.37 x 2.32 x 1.54″) (5r)
vs
120 x 67 x 43 mm (4.72 x 2.64 x 1.69″) (6)

For me, it was the right choice.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on October 25, 2013, 04:46:43 PM
I can't imagine having to ever use the optical viewfinder. I almost never have an issue using my phone in broad daylight; I can't imagine this would be much different, if at all.

I also don't ever tend to use the flash. And even if I did, is it worth $2-300 extra for those things? Meh. (For that money I can basically buy myself a telephoto lens, too!)

And, despite what you may think, the 5r body is smaller.

111 x 59 x 39 mm (4.37 x 2.32 x 1.54″) (5r)
vs
120 x 67 x 43 mm (4.72 x 2.64 x 1.69″) (6)

For me, it was the right choice.

They're both excellent choices :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: notanonymous on October 25, 2013, 04:47:11 PM
I can't imagine having to use the optical viewfinder. I personally almost never have an issue using my phone in broad daylight; I can't imagine this would be much different, if at all.

I also don't ever tend to use the flash. And, despite what you may think, the 5r is smaller.

For me, it was the right choice.
I am just the opposite.  I almost never use the LCD (except video).  If nothing else, it helps me stabilize the camera.  Also the shutter response is much better (at least on my camera) with the viewfinder.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on October 25, 2013, 04:50:02 PM
I can't imagine having to use the optical viewfinder. I personally almost never have an issue using my phone in broad daylight; I can't imagine this would be much different, if at all.

I also don't ever tend to use the flash. And, despite what you may think, the 5r is smaller.

For me, it was the right choice.
Phones screens are made to be used in broad daylight.  My Nex screen was not really usable in broad daylight. 
I've never used a viewfinder before, but the digital version on the 6 is just stunning.  Has to be used to believe.

And the lens of the 5 is significantly longer as it doesn't retract.  I can fit the 6 in my BR khakis pocket.  There's no possible way to do that with the 5.
Though SF will say that's an advantage as you don't have to wait the extra second for it to open.  Though when I tested them side by side it's at most a split second difference from power on to shooting time.

And it's not a matter of thinking.  I bought both the 5 and 6 from the local gmach for a couple weeks before concluding which made the most sense for me ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on October 25, 2013, 04:52:10 PM
If nothing else, it helps me stabilize the camera.  Also the shutter response is much better (at least on my camera) with the viewfinder.
Agreed.
Never used it on previous digital cameras, but there's something about it on the Nex that makes it awesome for pics.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on October 25, 2013, 05:16:00 PM
It may be the world's greatest viewfinder... But I'm not paying $2-300 for it.

... Even if it helps stabilize my shot :)


Like I said,  I'd rather have a telephoto lens and a freakin' tripod for that price!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on October 25, 2013, 05:17:36 PM
It may be the world's greatest viewfinder... But I'm not paying $2-300 for it.

... Even if it helps stabilize my shot :)
Lol. You'll definitely enjoy the 5 :)
Though the difference for me was less than that.

The compact lens size was what probably sealed my decision for the 6. But the combo of the 3 items (flash, size, viewfinder) made it worth the extra money once I was spending that much on my first pro camera anyway.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: notanonymous on October 25, 2013, 05:29:23 PM
Lol. You'll definitely enjoy the 5 :)
Though the difference for me was less than that.

The compact lens size was what probably sealed my decision for the 6. But the combo of the 3 items (flash, size, viewfinder) made it worth the extra money once I was spending that much on my first pro camera anyway.
To my call myself even an amateaur  photographer would be generous.  But is there really a difference in quality between these and a Pentax? I've had a K-X for more than 4 years.  It's great.  (again, see my disclaimer)I
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on October 25, 2013, 05:31:00 PM
Lol. You'll definitely enjoy the 5 :)
Though the difference for me was less than that.

The compact lens size was what probably sealed my decision for the 6. But the combo of the 3 items (flash, size, viewfinder) made it worth the extra money once I was spending that much on my first pro camera anyway.

Have you been using it for shots of the kids now?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on October 25, 2013, 05:32:52 PM
Have you been using it for shots of the kids now?
Yup, it's incredible.
Well worth the money.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on October 29, 2013, 08:10:37 AM
@something fishy  I was hoping to get some advice. I've always just dabbled in photography and I would like to really practice more and improve at taking pictures. I have a Canon SLR and a Sony NEx mirrorless. I have 2 lenses for my Canon already.  I'd like to invest in some lenses. Does it matter which camera I buy lenses for? I was thinking of getting rid of the SLR for now and just invest in NEX lenses at the moment. Any reason why I'd be better off with an SLR?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 29, 2013, 11:34:54 AM
@something fishy  I was hoping to get some advice. I've always just dabbled in photography and I would like to really practice more and improve at taking pictures. I have a Canon SLR and a Sony NEx mirrorless. I have 2 lenses for my Canon already.  I'd like to invest in some lenses. Does it matter which camera I buy lenses for? I was thinking of getting rid of the SLR for now and just invest in NEX lenses at the moment. Any reason why I'd be better off with an SLR?

It matters a lot which camera you’re getting lenses for, and it also depends of what type of lenses you’re talking about.
 
In general, Canon is a better long-term investment. There are hundreds of lenses available, from Canon’s own to plenty 3rd party options (which are often as good or better than Canon). No matter what type of level of lens you want you’d have a tremendous range of options. Also, these lenses have a phenomenal resale value. You could use a lens for years and sell it in ebay for close to what you paid for it – I’ve actually made a profit a couple of times.
 
With NEX on the other end, you’re very limited in options. There are hardly any fast lenses (f/1.8 or faster), and in any given range you have very few options. There are some third party lenses available, but on a far smaller scale than for Canon. Take for instance ultra wide-angle zooms: In the Canon mount you have 12 different options, ranging from $429 (Sigma 10-20 f/4-5.6) to $1499 (Canon 8-15 f/4L), and including the phenomonal Tokina 11-16 f/2.8 for under 500 bucks. With NEX, on the other hand, you have a grand total of 1 option: the Sony 10-18 f/4 for $848. The same thing happens with all other lenses – portrait, telephoto, etc. Limited options and hardly any resale market. And that’s not to mention that the quality of the Canon-mount lenses are generally better; there are very few pro-level lenses for NEX; that’s simply not the market.
 
Put simply, NEX is not a wise investment at all. For the consumer who wants a small camera with pro-quality results, it’s perfect. But once you try to build a system out if it you’d find yourself very limited. Not just with lenses; ever try to connect a remote or intervalometer to an NEX? Trigger off camera flash? Not gonna happen without lots of tinkering. With Canon on the other hand, everything’s there: insane lens selection, awesome second hand market (both buying and selling), everything you’ll ever need. And long term, the Canon mount is here to stay; any new camera will work with it 100% (APS-C vs. full frame notwithstanding). But it seems that Sony is starting to move away from NEX in favor of their new FE mount.
 
Is NEX smaller and lighter? Sure. Once you start adding lenses? Not so much anymore. Canon would be cheaper too (usually). Also remember that you could use your Canon lenses on NEX with an adapter (losing autofocus though), but you can't go the other way around.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on October 29, 2013, 11:56:26 AM
Right after I choose a NEX  :-X

 ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on October 29, 2013, 12:00:16 PM
Right after I choose a NEX  :-X

 ;)

Nah, as a first advanced camera a NEX is a great choice. Plus personally I end up using the Nex more than my Canon SLR for size alone.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 29, 2013, 04:40:14 PM
Right after I choose a NEX  :-X

 ;)

Right after you told me that you never plan on buying another lens except maybe a longer zoom ;).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on October 29, 2013, 05:54:24 PM
True,  true. Only so much time I can devote to this. Coming from a P&S,  I'm sure the quality will blow me away as it is.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on October 30, 2013, 04:05:59 PM
Right after you told me that you never plan on buying another lens except maybe a longer zoom ;).
you say canon is a good long term investment, as opposed to nikon?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 30, 2013, 04:24:07 PM
you say canon is a good long term investment, as opposed to nikon?

Not at all - my point was DSRL vs. NEX.

But regarding the age old Canon vs. Nikon debate, I always tell people to ignore the brand and get the camera they like; both companies make equally great cameras.



(Although Nikon rules and if you buy a Canon I WILL FIND YOU AND BEAT YOU OVER THE HEAD WITH MY TRIPOD.)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on October 30, 2013, 04:27:02 PM
Not at all - my point was DSRL vs. NEX.

But regarding the age old Canon vs. Nikon debate, I always tell people to ignore the brand and get the camera they like; both companies make equally great cameras.



(Although Nikon rules you and if you buy a Canon I WILL FIND YOU AND BEAT YOU OVER THE HEAD WITH MY TRIPOD.)
lol... i have a canon sold it and bought a nikon. LOVE my nikon, when i get good pics :)

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 30, 2013, 04:31:55 PM
i have a canon sold it and bought a nikon.

A man after my own heart! ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on October 30, 2013, 06:50:19 PM
A man after my own heart! ;)
I took a recent Tripp to Paris I will upload a few pics and I'll let you teachish how to shoot the Eiffel tower at night :-)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 30, 2013, 10:30:56 PM
I took a recent Tripp to Paris I will upload a few pics and I'll let you teachish how to shoot the Eiffel tower at night :-)

 :D Let's see 'em.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on October 31, 2013, 03:18:39 AM
:D Let's see 'em.
trying to upload em, but there to big for my free subscription at image shack, i have to go thru PS first just dont have tons of time yet lol
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on October 31, 2013, 05:01:36 AM
:D Let's see 'em.

Here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=1573.msg276082#msg276082) are mine. I didn't take along my tripod, hence the ledge in the second ET pic. I left it in because I thought it adds a little to the picture. Thoughts?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on October 31, 2013, 06:45:57 PM
Here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=1573.msg276082#msg276082) are mine. I didn't take along my tripod, hence the ledge in the second ET pic. I left it in because I thought it adds a little to the picture. Thoughts?
love those pics.. i see why i hated Versailles... it was rainy and cold.. it looks amazing in nice weather
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on October 31, 2013, 06:51:13 PM
(http://imageshack.com/scaled/1024x768/546/l9wx.jpg)


(http://imageshack.com/scaled/1024x768/10/u45p.jpg)


(http://imageshack.com/scaled/1024x768/51/vqmr.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on November 24, 2013, 01:06:42 AM
Here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=1573.msg276082#msg276082) are mine. I didn't take along my tripod, hence the ledge in the second ET pic. I left it in because I thought it adds a little to the picture. Thoughts?

Eiffel Tower at night
(http://i1141.photobucket.com/albums/n581/csrl8800/Paris/DSC_0737copy.jpg)

(http://i1141.photobucket.com/albums/n581/csrl8800/Paris/DSC_0748.jpg)

Both pictures are actually quite nice.

I like the first one better, for a couple of reasons. You usually want to avoid putting your subject smack in the middle of the picture, but it a case where everything is symmetrical it actually works. The Eiffel Tower itself is very symmetrical, but more importantly, the entire foreground 'leads' to the tower, anchoring it in position visually. The lights, the lines in the road, as are very symmetrical and support the main subject. Even the background works in favor of a centered subject - the two brightest objects in the background (which your eye sees first) are on either side of the tower - the big white dome on the left and the moon to the right. If any of these would be missing, the picture, which emphasizes symmetry, would have been off balance.

I also love the long exposure - you could see the motion in the clouds and the trail of cars' lights. The sunstars on the streetlamps in the foreground are also very attractive and add the the grandeur of the place.

Personally I'm not a big fan of selective coloring - I think the picture would be better all in black and white. It has all the elements for a good B&W - strong tones, lines, and clear subject. But again, this is personal taste.

As far as the second picture, you say that you like what the ledge adds to the picture. What I think you like IMO is the fact that the ledge acts as a foreground, which the picture would lack if it's cropped. As you've seen in the first picture, foregrounds are vital. However, I think that this ledge makes a very weak foreground. It has no detail (especially no interesting detail), and it has no relation to the subject. It's better than nothing of course, so I agree that you shouldn't have cropped it out. Compare it to the foreground in the first picture and I think you'll agree with me.

A problem with shooting at night is that the camera usually renders the clouds as being red. Since they aren't, it tends to look somewhat weird. A cooler white balance would have solved that, but would have rendered the lights on the tower more blue instead if the current very pleasing yellow. That's another reason why I think the first picture works better in B&W. Also note how the white moonlight competes with the red clouds, something which is mitigated in the B&W version.

Regarding the tilt, I always tell people that there's a difference between a crooked picture and a tilted one. In order to not look like a mistake, it has to have a certain degree of tilt to be believable. With this picture, I wish you would have tilted it just a bit more. There is certainly enough room at the corners to do this now, if you choose.

I also wish this picture had the sunstars too.

But overall, two extremely nice pictures.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on November 24, 2013, 01:38:41 AM
(http://imageshack.com/scaled/1024x768/546/l9wx.jpg)

(http://imageshack.com/scaled/1024x768/10/u45p.jpg)

(http://imageshack.com/scaled/1024x768/51/vqmr.jpg)

My favorite of the bunch is the middle one. But before we go there, let's discuss the first picture. The main issue I have is with the composition. THe first thing that hit me is that the picture is crooked - not by a lot, but the tower is kinda falling to the right. But most importantly, there's a tremendous amount of dead apace. Just black sky, adding nothing to the picture. Compare it to Chaim'l's pictures - his sky is visually alive with clouds. Of course the weather is is beyond your control, but at the end of the day a dead black sky lacks a certain amount of visual interest.

Also look at the foreground. The trunks of two cars, a bright white space, a dark black band, and a couple of streetlights. Again, not very interesting. The bright green light off to the right is also very distracting.

So mostly it's composition. When you go take a picture, stop for a moment and think of what you want to show. In this case, it's the Eiffel Tower. So make that your centerpiece, and make sure that nothing gets in it's way. Make sure that you have the main subject nailed - make it more prominent in your frame (why is it so small now?), make sure it's straight. Then start eliminating distractions (maybe moving a bit off to one side will hide the green light), and find a strong foreground (get down low on a patch of grass, get somewhere high and use a road).

The second picture is FAR stronger. It has a great graphical feel to it, and the composition is very good (although I wish I would've seen the entirety of the first 'porch', or whatever it is.. An inch or two to the right would have done that.). Again the sky is a boring black, but at least it doesn't punch you in the face, since most of the frame is taken up by the main subject.

The third picture is a nice snapshot, well composed and exposed. Again, I with there was another inch up on top so that I could see the entire arch.

Basically the thing you have to work on most is composition, IMO. Make sure to practice border patrol - look around the edges of your frame and make sure that you're not cutting off anything important, and that unwanted elements are not creeping in.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on November 24, 2013, 02:53:30 AM
OK, my turn  :D

(https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-G9msnOvPmQA/UpGv5d0vpXI/AAAAAAAAB-M/pUrD_GYZjfw/w414-h552-no-Ut/IMG_1486.JPG)

(https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-vAeb9GWw8mI/UpGwnN3gwQI/AAAAAAAAB-Y/EgQVUGfIJmQ/w414-h552-no/IMG_1490.JPG)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on November 24, 2013, 04:06:32 AM
My favorite of the bunch is the middle one. But before we go there, let's discuss the first picture. The main issue I have is with the composition. THe first thing that hit me is that the picture is crooked - not by a lot, but the tower is kinda falling to the right. But most importantly, there's a tremendous amount of dead apace. Just black sky, adding nothing to the picture. Compare it to Chaim'l's pictures - his sky is visually alive with clouds. Of course the weather is is beyond your control, but at the end of the day a dead black sky lacks a certain amount of visual interest.

Also look at the foreground. The trunks of two cars, a bright white space, a dark black band, and a couple of streetlights. Again, not very interesting. The bright green light off to the right is also very distracting.

So mostly it's composition. When you go take a picture, stop for a moment and think of what you want to show. In this case, it's the Eiffel Tower. So make that your centerpiece, and make sure that nothing gets in it's way. Make sure that you have the main subject nailed - make it more prominent in your frame (why is it so small now?), make sure it's straight. Then start eliminating distractions (maybe moving a bit off to one side will hide the green light), and find a strong foreground (get down low on a patch of grass, get somewhere high and use a road).

The second picture is FAR stronger. It has a great graphical feel to it, and the composition is very good (although I wish I would've seen the entirety of the first 'porch', or whatever it is.. An inch or two to the right would have done that.). Again the sky is a boring black, but at least it doesn't punch you in the face, since most of the frame is taken up by the main subject.

The third picture is a nice snapshot, well composed and exposed. Again, I with there was another inch up on top so that I could see the entire arch.

Basically the thing you have to work on most is composition, IMO. Make sure to practice border patrol - look around the edges of your frame and make sure that you're not cutting off anything important, and that unwanted elements are not creeping in.
thank you so much!!!! wow i really appreciate you taking the tie me out and writing. i will def work on those.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on November 24, 2013, 03:15:07 PM
Both pictures are actually quite nice.

...

But overall, two extremely nice pictures.

Wow! Thanks for that, it really gives me some food for thought...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 05, 2013, 01:54:49 AM
Lesson 3

Exposure Basics

Remember, click on the wiki if you want to see only the lessons and not the other posts.

I'm going to deviate from the order in the wiki a little here, since I'm finding it hard to continue in that order until some basics have been established.

Today I'm going to talk about exposure - the most basic recipe for a picture. Every time you click the shutter, you've made an exposure. What happens is simple: the thing covering the sensor - the shutter - opens up, exposing the sensor to the light coming through the lens, which is then recorded as an image. When the correct amount of light reaches the sensor - meaning the exposure is correct, the picture looks great. If not enough light hits the sensor, the picture will be too dark, and is considered underexposed, while an overexposed picture will be far too bright, due to too much light being let in.

These 3 pictures were taken one after another: the first one is correctly exposed, while the second one is overexposed and the third is underexposed:

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2857/11111254973_51cd15b26c_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/9FAEx2)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7429/11111126314_74f59111b8_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/947kJM)

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3796/11111127854_606bbd2665_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/660m84)

There are three things which determine any exposure: shutter speed, aperture, and ISO.

Shutter speed is the time that the shutter covering the sensor is open. The longer it's open, the more light reaches the sensor. Shutter speed is indicated in time (usually in fractions of a second) - i.e. a shutter speed of 1/250 means that the shutter was open for 1/250th of a second.

Aperture, as already discussed, is the size of the lens opening. The larger the opening (lower f/number), the more light gets in.

ISO was also touched upon earlier; the higher the ISO setting, the more sensitive the sensor is to light.

So what does all this mean? Imagine a bucket being filled up with water. You need the perfect balance between the size of the bucket, the diameter of the water pipe, and the length of time the faucet is on. If these are all balanced, the correct amount of water will flow for the correct amount of time and the bucket will be filled correctly. Change any of these, and you end up either thirsty or with a huge mess on your hands.

However, imagine if the pipe was twice the size it needs to be. How do you prevent disaster? You could do two things: double the size of the bucket, or halve the amount of time the water flows. Same goes if the bucket is to small – you could either halve the diameter of the pipe or halve the amount of time.

The same applies here to us. If you double your shutter speed (1/250 > 1/125), in order to maintain the same exposure you will need to either halve your ISO (400 > 200), or halve your aperture (f/4 > f/5.6*). Conversely, if you halve your aperture, you'd have to double your ISO or shutter speed.

*"Wait a minute. Half of 4 is 5.6?! What's Fishy smoking?" Relax - I'm not outta my mind just yet. As discussed in the last lesson, since the f/numbers are a fraction, larger numbers are actually smaller. Now the reason half of 4 isn't, say, 8, is because these numbers define the area of the open aperture. Happens to be, as far as our math here is concerned, that half the area of f/4 is f/5.6. You're gonna have to trust me on this one.

A photographer is on a constant quest for a very simple thing - enough light. Outside on a sunny day light is in plentiful supply and it's no challenge getting it into the camera. But the minute the light starts dropping, say any indoor situation, the camera and photographer have to start making desiccation how to suck every available photon into the lens to achieve a nice exposure. Knowing what we just learned, grabbing more light could be accomplished three ways: a longer shutter speed, a larger aperture, or a higher ISO setting (I'll cover flash and supplemental lighting separately; for now we're talking camera only).

So now the question is, why should you even have to know this? Keeping your camera on Auto results in correct exposures 99% of the time, so why do you have to know the reasoning behind it all? The answer is one word: control. The easiest way of getting your pictures from looking like snapshots to looking like photographs is to leave the security of the Auto mode and venture into the wilds of your mode dial. Nearly all cameras allow you to control these three parameters to a certain extent - some more than others, some easily and some only through backdoor methods and tricks. We'll discuss HOW to change these settings later on, but first let's see WHY you should.

We have to understand that if we have three options available, why does it matter how we balance them? So long as the final result looks good, who cares if it was achieved using a large aperture or a high ISO? The answer is that there's a reason for having three options: each one does something completely different to your picture, and each one has it's own very important limitations. Understanding what each does and doesn't do is key to taking your photography to the next level.

Aperture: What the aperture really controls is not the amount of light, but the depth-of-field (DOF) in your image. The fact that it lets through more or less light is just a by-product of this function. DOF is the amount of in-focus area in any given image. A shallow (or small) DOF is one where only a small part of the picture is in focus, say a portrait. A large DOF, on the other hand, is one where things over a great distance are in focus, such as a landscape.

The following is one the most important photography foundations to remember, so repeat after me:

- The smaller the f/number, the larger the aperture, the smaller the DOF (less in focus), the more light gets in.
- The larger the f/number, the smaller the aperture, the greater the DOF (more in focus), the less light gets in.

Now lather, rinse, and repeat. I'll wait.

Here we have two pictures which are similar, yet very different. The first picture was taken at f/2.8 - a large aperture. There is a very shallow DOF here: only the bow of the kayak is in focus. Everything else - the mountains, the clouds, even the water a foot away from the boat - is out of focus.

The second picture was taken at f/11 - a moderately small aperture. As you could see, there is a tremendous depth-of-field. Everything from the bow a foot away from the camera to the mountains a mile away is in perfect focus.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7294/11112038594_c837fb9472_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/63M2t3)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7324/11112039104_b12be0ab0e_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/4t3gU6)

So now back to our discussion on exposure: if you need more light, why not just use a larger aperture? Who needs longer shutter speeds or higher ISOs? The answer is because there are some very important tradeoffs:

- If you use a larger aperture, less will be in focus, right? But what if you want everything in focus? What if your shooting a group of people? You can't have only the first row in focus and the others blurry! Suddenly, you can't rely on your aperture to let in the light, since you can't open it too big. That's where your shutter speed and ISO will come into the picture. Not enough light coming in from the aperture? Use a slower shutter! Use a higher ISO!
- Another issue is that large-aperture lenses (f/2.8 and above) are large, heavy, and expensive. Most people simply don't have them or can't afford them.
- And the final problem is physical. Once you've reached your largest aperture, that's it, there's no going further. Using your shutter speed and ISO, you are able to move past that to get more light.

Next up: shutter speed. If you need more light, why not just leave the shutter open as long as needed? The answer is that the speed of the shutter controls the amount of motion in your shot. A fast shutter speed will freeze everything, since only so much movement takes place in 1/4000th of a second. The longer the shutter stays open, the more movement becomes apparent. What this means is that if your shutter stays open a smidgen too long, you will end up with the dreaded blurry picture.

So if it's too dark and you have to keep your shutter speed low, your options are - say it with me - using a larger aperture or higher ISO.

Keep in mind that a tripod (and Image Stabilization), will enable longer shutter speeds. However, since it eliminates camera movement only, it does exactly zilch for subject movement. Sometimes there is no choice other than using a fast shutter speed.

Here we have three different effects caused by varying the shutter speed, where you could clearly see all this.

The first picture used a fast shutter (1/250th of a second), so everything is frozen in place. The rocks are perfectly sharp, and the water has been frozen in mid-drop.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3747/11165346203_918214c144_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/1rC156)

Next, we have a classic example of a blurry picture - the shutter was too slow, so everything is completely blurred.

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3754/11165348113_1c8661640c_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/um536Q)

For the final picture, I kept the slow shutter speed (2 seconds), but used a tripod. This illustrates how a tripod only compensates for camera movement - since the camera was completely steady, and the rocks of course didn't move, they are perfectly sharp. Everything that moves, however, is blurry. In the water this is a desirable effect, as it renders the waterfalls as beautiful ribbons of silky water. Note though how the wind caused the tree on the right-hand side to blur, too.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7412/11165217974_5f0bd99801_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/0Z40EE)

And then we have ISO. As discussed in the last lesson, the higher the ISO, the more noise in the picture. To keep a perfectly sharp and clean picture the ISO should be as low as possible. That's why when you need more light, you may have to go back to your aperture or shutter speed.

These two pictures (taken from the last lesson) show the clear difference between a low ISO (400), low noise picture (top) and a high ISO (8000), high noise picture (bottom):

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7305/11165489776_ee6682cb1b_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/538t2Y)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7327/11165461095_0dc50139a9_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/3ae63s)

The newer and more expensive a camera is (generally speaking), the higher ISO you could use without showing too much noise. A 5-year old camera for example may have enough noise at ISO 400 to be unusable, while a modern full-frame camera could go to ISO 3200 and stay clean. Same goes for larger sensors - the large the sensor, the more noise it could handle.

Now... Here's the deal: The camera does not know what it's shooting. How is it supposed to know how much of the scene you want in focus? Whether you're on a tripod or not? Whether your subject is moving or not? The answer is that it doesn't. It will choose an exposure recipe it thinks is most likely to keep it out of trouble, not necessarily one which will result in the prettiest photograph.

However, now that you know how the exposure triangle works, YOU could take control and tell the camera just what you want it to do. For example, most cameras will not normally go above ISO 800 - they'll use a longer shutter speed instead when more light is needed. Now you tell me: what would you rather have - a picture that's completely blurred, or one with lots of noise?

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3754/11165348113_1c8661640c_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/um536Q)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7327/11165461095_0dc50139a9_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/3ae63s)

Obviously you'd choose a noisy one - at least it's something, as opposed to a blurry mess. But the camera itself will never make that decision for you. If you move out of Auto mode, however, you'd be able to tell the camera to lay off the shutter speed and instead raise the ISO.
_________

Exposure is measured in stops - each stop means either double of half the light. For example, if you have a shutter speed of 1/250, a stop up would be 1/125 - double the exposure time, and twice the amount of light. A stop down would be 1/500 - half the exposure time, therefore half the light. The three example picture in the beginning of this lesson are about 3 stops apart - the correctly exposed one is has a shutter speed of 1/640, while the overexposed one is at 1/80 (1/640 > 1/320 > 1/180 > 1/80), and the underexposed one is at 1/4000 (1/640 > 1/1000 > 1/2000 > 1/4000 (at 1/1000 and above most cameras start rounding the numbers)).

Let's imagine a scenario for a moment. You're taking pictures of your 2-year old. It's nighttime, and there's not too bright in your living room. Half your pictures are coming out blurry, since he's running around in circles nonstop. You check your camera and see that your aperture is maxed out - let's say f/3.5. Nothing you could do about that, as it ain't gettin' any bigger. Your ISO is at 400, and the shutter speed is at 1/60. Do you:

a) Throw the kid in the bath, where he has to sit (fairly) still
b) Resolve to never again let him eat an entire package of gummy bears right before bedtime
c) Try to get your shutter speed fast enough to actually freeze him and get a sharp picture.

If you answered a or b then great, it's past his bedtime anyway. But if you want to get a decent picture, you do c. Since you can't make your aperture larger, how are you gonna get the light you need? Use a longer shutter speed? Definitely not, that'll just make everything blurrier. So you want to raise your ISO - but how much? Sure, you could do trial and error, but there's a simpler way. Knowing that if we cut our shutter speed in half, we'd have twice the chance of a sharp picture, the first thing you should is re-balance your triangle. Since doubling your shutter speed will result in half as much light, doubling your ISO form 400 to 800 will compensate for that! Now that your sensor is twice as sensitive to light, the picture will look the same even now that the shutter speed was halved. You lost a stop of exposure with your shutter, but you gained a stop through your ISO.

Look carefully at the following exposures and you'll see that at the end of the day the exposure will be identical. You would choose one over the other based on your need for that particular photograph, as far as DOF, motion, noise, etc.:

f/4, 1/60, ISO 400
f/5.6, 1/30, ISO 400
f/11, 1/15, ISO 800

In the second example, we lost one stop of light by using a smaller aperture, but we gained it back by adding one more stop of shutter speed. In the third example, we lost a full three stops from the first, but we gained it back by adding two stops of shutter speed (1/60 > 1/30 > 1/15) and one stop of ISO.

With this information in hand you will be able to control exactly how and when your camera chooses one setting over the other, and will be able to make your own creative decisions. In the next lesson we'll discuss exposure modes - the options and controls that make all this choosing possible.

___________
Lesson Summary:

- The most basic part of taking a picture is exposure - making sure that the right amount of light reaches the sensor.
- Exposure is the correct balance between aperture size, shutter speed, and ISO level.

Aperture:
- The aperture is the size of the lens opening. It determines how much is in focus (depth of field) and how much light is let in at any given time.
- The smaller the f/number, the larger the aperture, the smaller the DOF (less in focus), the more light gets in.
- The larger the f/number, the smaller the aperture, the greater the DOF (more in focus), the less light gets in.
- The limitations are the physical maximum, and the required DOF.

Shutter speed:
- Determines the time that the sensor is exposed to light and the level of motion in the picture.
- A fast shutter speed (low fraction of a second) lets in less light and freezes motion.
- A slow or long shutter speed (a large portion of a second, or longer) lets in more light and shows motion.
- The limitations are the requirements for a sharp picture. Too long a shutter speed and camera and/or subject motion is recorded as a blur.

ISO
- Determines the sensitivity of the sensor to light.
- A higher ISO level lets the sensor absorb more light, but creates noise.
- A lower ISO level lets in less light but does not create noise.
- Better and newer sensors handle high noise levels much better.
- Limitations are the acceptable levels of noise and image degradation.

- If you change one of these parameters and want to keep the same exposure, you will have to compensate by adjusting one of the others.

- Knowing all this will allow you to take creative control of how your image will come out, as opposed to leaving it all at the mercy of your camera.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on December 05, 2013, 07:53:29 AM
Awesome thanks! I didn't want to nudge knowing that your giving up your own time for this but we honestly really appreciate this and are really excited to continue!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yeki89 on December 05, 2013, 10:05:37 AM
Awesome thanks! I didn't want to nudge knowing that your giving up your own time for this but we honestly really appreciate this and are really excited to continue!
+1

Keep it coming.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on December 05, 2013, 10:51:27 AM
This lesson was really informative, I knew the basics but have always struggles with the details when trying night photography, I remember one night in Nepal the mountains were looking really pretty in the moonlight and I was struggling for half an hour toggling exposure times and ISOs (not having a tripod made things infinitely worse) and the best I got for my efforts were the abominations below:
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on December 05, 2013, 01:37:03 PM
Awesome update, thanks for taking the time! Once the lessons are complete (or we finally plan a big family trip) I plan on finally getting a real quality mirrorless or dslr and move away from my phone:-)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on December 05, 2013, 10:29:01 PM
Thanks so much.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 06, 2013, 12:36:08 AM
1. Thanks again. Great job!

2. I'm curious, did you take multiple versions of these pictures with the intention of using them to illustrate the differences? Or did you just happen to have them from fooling around / trying to get the correct exposure?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 12:56:25 AM
1. Thanks again. Great job!

2. I'm curious, did you take multiple versions of these pictures with the intention of using them to illustrate the differences? Or did you just happen to have them from fooling around / trying to get the correct exposure?

The glacier pictures were bracketed for potential HDR, so it was taken that way anyways.

The kayak pictures was just fooling around, trying different effects.

The waterfall pictures were specifically taken to illustrate the effects of shutter speed on a dedicated trip.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 06, 2013, 01:04:11 AM
The glacier pictures were bracketed for potential HDR, so it was taken that way anyways.
I'm sure if I keep following the lessons I'll eventually learn what that means :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 01:11:30 AM
I'm sure if I keep following the lessons I'll eventually learn what that means :)

Very definitely :D.

For now let's just say that I took the same picture at very different exposures as part of a technique called HDR.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 01:26:04 AM
This lesson was really informative, I knew the basics but have always struggles with the details when trying night photography, I remember one night in Nepal the mountains were looking really pretty in the moonlight and I was struggling for half an hour toggling exposure times and ISOs (not having a tripod made things infinitely worse) and the best I got for my efforts were the abominations below:

Nah, I wouldn't call them 'abominations' - I've seen far worse. What's messing up the shots is a tremendous amount of noise, plus motion blur (notice the ghost of a second mountain around the first in the first picture). With the proper support, you could have taken a picture at 10 minutes and ISO 200 without even a hint of noise or blur.

I never, ever, carry my camera without some sort of tripod. Doesn't matter where I'm going, I always have something with me. A tripod like this  (http://www.amazon.com/Manfrotto-709B-Table-Tripod-Black/dp/B0000YD2JC/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1386311137&sr=8-1&keywords=manfrotto+tabletop+tripod)weighs close to nothing, and supports my D600 and 24-70 f2.8 easily.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on December 06, 2013, 01:39:41 AM
Great lessons.  You should really do a seminar!
Or a trip to Kauai ;)
Heck, even a day trip lesson to Miami (Everglades?) this winter would be cool.

Which tripod do you recommend for the Nex-6 that I would be able to take on a hike?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 02:18:31 AM
As far as tripod, your main concern would be price and weight, since just about any tripod could support an NEX, no problem. A carbon fiber one would be lightest, but much more expensive than aluminum. Aluminum however is much heavier, so you might not want to carry it for longer hikes. It's a tradeoff between a better, more expensive, but more practical tripod vs. a cheaper, heavier one.

The so-called 'travel' tripods fold over themselves, so they're even smaller. They also come in AL and CF versions, but are usually more expensive that standard tripods. This one seems quite nice, should work perfectly with an NEX.

What do you think of this tripod: http://www.costco.com/.product.802732.html
Your waterfall picture in the exposure lesson convinced me that I need a tripod and I definitely want something compact...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on December 06, 2013, 02:23:46 AM
Thoughts on this one?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZGN6MY/?tag=cl03f-20
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 06, 2013, 02:28:43 AM
Thoughts on this one?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZGN6MY/?tag=cl03f-20 (http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZGN6MY/?tag=cl03f-20)
Judging strictly based on price, I would say his answer will be
From the pictures it looks a bit too flimsy for that (the rated capacity says nothing about real life usage). What specifically worries me is the head, and the plate mechanism.

If you're able to return it easily I say get it and try it out, since if it's solid enough it'll be a great deal. Lift it as high as it could go (legs only, keep the center column down), and take a long exposure (>30 seconds). Examine the picture closely, and check for any blur. If everything's sharp, you're good. Do this test outdoors, since you have to take some wind into account (as you will in a real life shooting condition).

Also mount your camera and give the whole setup a good shaking over a bed. If the camera goes flying, you have a plate mechanism problem :D .
or worse...
:)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 02:29:37 AM
Thoughts on this one?
http://www.amazon.com/dp/B004ZGN6MY/?tag=cl03f-20

For $15 you won't get anything decent. That particular one will not be able to keep your camera still at all (and not only because it's a video tripod, not a photo one). I have countless samples of such tripods at work and I could tell you that they'll break just by looking at it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 02:30:35 AM
Judging strictly based on price, I would say his answer will be
:)

Nah, don't even waste your time on this one.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on December 06, 2013, 02:31:12 AM
For $15 you won't get anything decent. That particular one will not be able to keep your camera still at all (and not only because it's a video tripod, not a photo one). I have countless samples of such tripods at work and I could tell you that they'll break just by looking at it.
More attracted the weight than the price.
What would it cost to get a good tripod that weighs just a pound?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 02:38:03 AM
More attracted the weight than the price.
What would it cost to get a good tripod that weighs just a pound?

A pound is completely unrealistic. A semi-decent head will weigh that, not counting the legs. Think about how you're gonna carry it - strapped onto a backpack? On a shoulder strap? 3 or 4 pounds is not an much of an issue then, you won't really notice it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on December 06, 2013, 03:31:40 AM
I got this one for travel use and I've been very happy with it.
At full extension it's a bit shaky but you can anchor it hanging something from the hook under the head.
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B001D60LG8/ref=mp_s_a_1_1?qid=1386318565&sr=8-1&pi=SY200
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on December 06, 2013, 03:33:41 AM
Great lessons.  You should really do a seminar!
Or a trip to Kauai ;)
Heck, even a day trip lesson to Miami (Everglades?) this winter would be cool.
Day trip through the Everglades would be really cool!
I'd definitely be in on that.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 06, 2013, 03:38:03 AM
Day trip through the Everglades would be really cool!
I'd definitely be in on that.

See here:
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=35505.0
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on December 06, 2013, 03:42:17 AM
See here:
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=35505.0
Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on December 07, 2013, 11:56:42 PM
Thanks for the great article. I enjoy your writing style.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 08, 2013, 12:00:03 AM
Thanks for the great article. I enjoy your writing style.

:D
Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yeki89 on December 10, 2013, 08:21:11 AM
Free food photography course

https://www.udemy.com/basic-food-photography/

Coupon FREEDAY
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 10, 2013, 12:37:38 PM
So I just got my dslr (thanks something fishy :)  )
And just had my sons pidyan haben yesterday!

My wife would like to now take some portraits of our cutee ...
I know it's way down on your list - portraits for newborns- but maybe you can give me some short tips,
As idk if hell still be a newborn by the time you get there :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 10, 2013, 02:07:26 PM
So I just got my dslr (thanks something fishy :)  )
And just had my sons pidyan haben yesterday!

My wife would like to now take some portraits of our cutee ...
I know it's way down on your list - portraits for newborns- but maybe you can give me some short tips,
As idk if hell still be a newborn by the time you get there :)

OK - some short and sweet tips:

1) Make sure he's in a good mood. After a feeding, after a nap. It's a simple thing that many people forget.

2) Get close. Shoot closeups and lots of details. Face, hands, feet.

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2808/11311370856_217e797ab5_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/1627Ru)

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5541/11311455913_80a8a5b9ab_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/1c21k7)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7321/11311408044_36cc686b20_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/8b08Pt)

Remember when you get close to not simply move the camera closer. Rather use the longest setting on your zoom and back up if needed. This is due to something called lens distortion and compression which I'll cover in detail in due time. But for now look at these examples and you'll see why you should do that.

I couldn't find any pictures to illustrate this at the moment, so for now these creepy pictures of my wife's shaitel head will have to suffice :P. The first picture was taken at 24mm full frame (Just about 18mm on an APS-C camera such as an NEX), while the second picture was taken at 85mm (similar to 55mm on APS-C). Note that while both pictures show the exact same view, in the first one the entire face distorted. The chin, nose, and forehead are all stretched out, while the lips appear to grow the further right you go. All I did to the second picture is use a longer lens and back up a bit - but now, instead of being grotesque, the entire face is rendered in a very flattering way.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7400/11311927464_e02d9456cf_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/smJGt7/)

3) Use soft light. Babies are soft and round, so the light should match. No flash or harsh fluorescent lighting. Use the biggest window you have, preferably one facing north. If the window faces east or wast the light will be harsher, so diffuse the light by either draping a white bed sheet over the window (a white shower curtain works well too), or if you have them, draw the thin white curtains.

If you do this, you may find that the far side (away from the window) is slightly dark. Hold up a white pillowcase or blanket to bounce some light back. Anything white would really work for this, even oaktag or something similar.

The first picture is straight-up window light - notice how her hair is very dark with hardly any detail to it. In the next picture I had someone hold up a white blanket - it bounced just enough light back to open up the shadows and bring out the detail.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7403/11311378296_43e059f25f_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/dH8h4B)

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2866/11311458133_477db0dd68_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/mFWccN)

4) Use your largest aperture. This will make the background go blurry and keep the focus on the baby.

5) You don't need any fancy equipment. All the pictures above were take with simple window light and a white pillowcase as a reflector. In the close-up pictures she's being held by her father, who was wearing a white shirt - simple and safe. In the pictures where she's lying down I took two chairs, laid a large pillow across them, and covered it with a pink blanket. The background is a simple bed sheet. (For safety, the mother hands are right outside the picture ready to grab the baby if she as much twitches.)

6) Remember to focus on the important pictures :D.

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7343/11312012806_030e87eeb9_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/nJ46o9)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on December 10, 2013, 03:29:02 PM
Nice!

Minor quibble.
FWIU, won't there be pincushion distortion at the longest end of most lenses? Especially the lenses that most here are likely using.
Or do you hold that the increased DOF cancels it out? ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 10, 2013, 03:34:02 PM
Nice!

Minor quibble.
FWIU, won't there be pincushion distortion at the longest end of most lenses? Especially the lenses that most here are likely using.
Or do you hold that the increased DOF cancels it out? ;)

The slight pincushion distortion you'd sometimes find at 55/105/135mm is nothing compared to wide angle distortion. At worst, it'll make the nose a drop smaller, which most people would prefer anyways, to tele still wins.

If you look closely at the first picture, you'd notice some barrel distortion in the background. That, too, is nothing compared to the WA distortion in the picture.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ari9 on December 10, 2013, 03:58:03 PM
thanks for the newborn mini lesson!
now I have to go try this out
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 10, 2013, 04:33:05 PM
Thanks a mil!!
Will try as soon as I'm a bit comfortable with the camera ...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on December 12, 2013, 10:05:20 PM
I recently bought the Cannon s110. I have been trying to blur the background on my shots. While shooting macro I have been able to, but with regular shoots I haven't been able to even when the aperture is at f/2.0. any advice, or is this camera not capable of blurring the background even at such a high aperture?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 12, 2013, 10:44:39 PM
I recently bought the Cannon s110. I have been trying to blur the background on my shots. While shooting macro I have been able to, but with regular shoots I haven't been able to even when the aperture is at f/2.0. any advice, or is this camera not capable of blurring the background even at such a high aperture?

The biggest contributor to blurry backgrounds (after a large aperture) is the sensor size. The sensor on the s110 is simply not capable of doing that, it's too small. You could however squeeze a bit more blur out by doing the other things that help - namely shooting at the lens' longest setting and putting a lot of space between your subject and background.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on December 13, 2013, 01:10:50 PM
Mr Something Fishy!

I must tell you I have no words to thank you for your rich written posts full of info, I enjoyed every word of it and learned so much,
You answer everyone's questions and comments with no problem,
One can ask a simple question and you'll answer with a 5 paragraph post,
It's really nice of you and hoshem should repay you!!

Now to my question ;)
Any recommendations on which SD card to use or its not much of a difference?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 13, 2013, 01:39:32 PM
Mr Something Fishy!

I must tell you I have no words to thank you for your rich written posts full of info, I enjoyed every word of it and learned so much,
You answer everyone's questions and comments with no problem,
One can ask a simple question and you'll answer with a 5 paragraph post,
It's really nice of you and hoshem should repay you!!

Thanks for the kind words :D. It's my pleasure.

Now to my question ;)
Any recommendations on which SD card to use or its not much of a difference?

It actually is much of a difference. After shabbos I'll try to post a 5 paragraph answer (at least ;))getting into all the details.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on December 13, 2013, 01:40:51 PM

It actually is much of a difference. After shabbos I'll try to post a 5 paragraph answer (at least ;))getting into all the details.
Really? i would have never thought...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 13, 2013, 01:41:59 PM
Really? i would have never thought...

Then it'll be a surprise ;D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on December 13, 2013, 01:48:43 PM
This thread teaches every time....
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 13, 2013, 03:06:02 PM
Thanks for the shout out Dan :D

http://www.dansdeals.com/archives/38334
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on December 14, 2013, 07:54:33 PM
Thanks for the shout out Dan :D

http://www.dansdeals.com/archives/38334
It's well deserved.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 15, 2013, 01:02:17 AM
Lesson 4

Exposure Basics Part 2 - getting to know your mode dial, and other exposure controls

Remember, click on the wiki if you want to see only the lessons and not the other posts.

Continuing on from last lesson, we now know why you should move beyond your cameras Auto mode and start taking control. Today we'll talk how to take this control. Not all camera's will offer full control, but even those that don't still have ways of getting what you want, to an extent.

If you have any DLSR or mirrorless camera you will be able to have 100% control over everything, should you so choose. Most advanced P&Ss (such the Canon S110 and G15, Panasonic LX5, etc.) will also offer this level of control. However, a typical P&S (such a Canon Elph), will be quite limited.

A camera which offers full control is often referred to as having "PASM" - we'll discuss exactly what that means in a moment. Most of the time, there will be a physical dial on the camera for all options - this is called the mode dial. Sometimes, especially on low-end mirrorless or some P&Ss, these options will be menu-driven. Let's have a look at a typical mode dial, and discus what every exposure mode does, how it does it, and when you should choose one over the other. These modes could be grouped into three unique categories; let's have a look starting from the bottom:

Automatic Modes:

Auto: Usually indicated by a green square, this mode is exactly what it sounds like. The camera makes every single decision for you. Some cameras will let you turn the flash off in this mode, but that's about it.

Various scene modes: There will be anywhere from none, to one, to many of these on your mode dial. These are usually indicated by a tiny icon of the scene - a flower for close-up (macro), a head for portraits, mountains for landscapes, and so on. These modes are also fully automatic, but are somewhat optimized for the chosen scene. For example, Portrait will use the largest aperture available, so as to blur the background, while Landscape will do the opposite.

Smart Auto: sometimes also called Intelligent Auto, Enhanced Auto, or something similar. This is a mashup of straight Auto and Scene Modes. In this mode, the camera will attempt to figure out what type of scene it's looking at, and then choose from the available scene modes whatever it thinks is most appropriate. This mode is usually indicated by a green square and an asterisk, or by a proprietary logo.

These 3 modes give you no control over your picture in any way. Sure, the scene mode may give you a better result than straight-up Auto, but as discussed last time, the camera is only so smart. You, being somewhat smarter (no offense ;)), will want to move up to the next level of modes.
____________

Program Modes:

These are the modes which offer the best balance of control and convenience. You make the decisions, but the camera does the heavy lifting. These modes make up the P, A, and S of the PASM we discussed earlier.

Program (P): This mode is just like Auto in that the camera makes the decisions, but with one critical difference: You are able to override everything. While in Auto mode all options are blocked out, in Program mode if you're unhappy with what the camera delivered you could tell the camera what to change. Think the camera underexposed a bit? Use Exposure Compensation. Don't like the White Balance? Change it. ISO? Focusing mode? Metering mode? All within your control, if you so choose. (We'll talk separately about all these features in depth later on).

- Some cameras have something called Extended Program (or something similar). This is usually accessed via a separate button or dial (as opposed from the mode dial), and may be denoted with a P and an asterisk. What this does is very camera-dependent, but it usually lets you temporarily access the functionality from modes A and S below.

Aperture Priority(A): Most camera companies call this Aperture Priority mode, while Canon calls it Aperture Value. Hence, on a Canon it'll be denoted as AV, while everyone else will mark it as A. In this mode, you choose the aperture, while the camera chooses the appropriate shutter speed. Since this mode is the most useful and is what most people are probably best off shooting at, I'll discuss it in far more detail once we're done going through the other modes.

Shutter Priority(S): As in A mode above, Canon decided to call this differently than everyone else; on their mode dial you'll find TV, for Time Value. This mode is the exact opposite of the Aperture mode; here you set the shutter speed, while the camera chooses the appropriate aperture. This mode will be expounded upon together with A mode further down.
___________

Manual Modes:

Manual (M): This mode is exactly what it sounds like: 100% manual. The camera does absolutely nothing for you; you dial in every single setting. There are plenty of situations where you'd use this, such as shooting stars at night, where it's too dark for the camera to figure out how to expose, of if you're shooting with any sort of supplemental lighting (such as in a studio setting). The camera has no idea that all these other light are going to go off, so it won't know to set an exposure taking them into account.

Bulb: Most cameras only let you use up to a 30 second exposure, regardless of the mode. What if you want to use something longer? That's where Bulb mode comes in. It's exactly like Manual mode, but instead of a set shutter speed, it stays open as long as you like. You'd press the shutter button once to open the shutter, then press it again when you want the exposure to end. In this mode you'd want to use a remote to trigger the camera, since you pressing the shutter in the middle of the exposure will usually result in camera shake (even on a tripod), so you'll end up with a blurry picture.
__________

Let's take a moment to discuss the A and S modes a bit more:

One of the first things you have to decide when composing a picture is how much of it do you want in focus. Are you shooting a landscape, and you want everything from the flowers at your feet to the distant mountains in focus? Are you shooting a portrait of your kid in the park, and want only his face in focus, while the distracting trees and people behind him should be a creamy blur? Or do you want the things in the background to be clearly distinguishable to provide context, but still want them slightly blurry to keep the focus on your kid?

In order to accomplish any of these effects you have to set your aperture correctly. With a little bit of experimentation, you will learn how your lenses render scenes. For example, in the third scenario, you don't want to be at your maximum aperture, since everything will be completely out if focus (that would be the second scenario). So you'd want to use a moderately large aperture, say f/5.6. That way the background will still be blurry, but clear enough for it to be obvious that you're in the park. For the first scenario, on the other hand, you'd want to use the smallest aperture possible, since that'll leave the most in focus. (This last sentence is somewhat oversimplified, as there are things like diffraction and hyperfocal distance to take into account. But these are very advanced topics, which will be discussed in due time.)

From these few theoretical examples, you see that focusing on using the correct aperture is a vital step. Now - as discussed in the last lesson, your choice of aperture will have a tremendous impact on your exposure. Imagine if there was a mode where all you have to do exposure-wise is choose an aperture, and the camera will choose the rest. Well, that's what Aperture Priority mode does. You tell the camera to shoot at f/4, and the camera will choose the appropriate shutter speed/ISO combination (more on ISO modes later). Lets say you take your picture, and you decide that f/4 was too much and you want more of the background in focus. All you have to do in A mode is adjust the aperture - the camera will automatically adjust the shutter speed to match.

It is very rare that if you choose the aperture and you let the camera choose the shutter speed that you will not be pleased with the results. This is why most of the time it's best to leave your camera in this mode. Your camera doesn't know if you're shooting a landscape or a portrait. But once you tell it the vital part - the aperture - it could generally figure the rest out from there.

Shutter Priority is the polar opposite of Aperture Priority. You probably won't need to use this very often, but when you do need it it's indispensable. For example, when shooting sports, sometimes you know you need a shutter speed of 1/2000th to freeze the motion. In such a case you set your mode dial to S, your shutter speed to 1/2000, and the camera figures out the rest.
__________

Other exposure controls

ISO
You'll notice that that as far as exposure, the mode dial only seems to cover aperture and shutter speed. Whatever happened to the third part of the triangle, ISO? Well, here's the lowdown.

All cameras have at least two ways of dealing with ISO:

Automatic: The camera chooses whichever ISO it deems best. This is sometimes good, but of course sometimes it'd be completely wrong. If you're on a tripod for example, the camera won't know this and would jack up your ISO into the stratosphere, instead of giving you a longer shutter speed.

Manual: You choose the ISO. Typically a camera will offer options from ISO 100 to ISO 6400. These go in exposure stops, so as discussed, ISO 400 will be half as sensitive as ISO 800, and therefore requires either double the shutter speed or double the aperture.

Using manual ISO along with Aperture Priority mode, we have a perfect example of why taking control of your camera is so amazing. Imagine shooting the Eiffel Tower at night, on a tripod. Left to it's own devices, the camera will probably choose a very large aperture (since it's dark and a larger aperture will let in more light), an obscenely high ISO (again, more sensitivity to light), and whatever shutter speed it calculates it needs based on these two parameters (probably something like 1/10th of a second). What do you think the picture would the picture look like? Not only will the foreground will be out of focus due to the large aperture, but everything will be covered in so much noise that the picture may not even be usable.

However, if you take control of your camera, you could choose a small aperture, a very low ISO, and let the camera choose the shutter speed (say, 10 seconds). You won't have to worry about the fact that the shutter speed with inevitably be very long, as you know the secret that you're on a tripod.

What will happen is that everything you want will be in focus (small aperture), there will be no noise whatsoever (low ISO), and the picture will look great. Another benefit of this particular setup (small aperture + long shutter speed) is that it will introduce a number of lovely elements into the picture. The small aperture will cause points of light to appear as stars, while the long shutter speed will blur clouds, and turn car headlights into pretty streaks of light (these effects will also be discussed at length eventually). See Chaim'l's first picture here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg639828#msg639828) for a great example of this scenario, including the effects I just mentioned.

Back to ISO, you'd notice that some cameras have an ISO lineup that goes like this: Lo1, Lo2, 200, 400, 800, 1600, 3200, 6400, Hi1, Hi2. What's going on here? Basically most sensors have what's called native ISO and extended ISO. The native settings would be the numbered ones; those are what the sensor is optimized for. The higher you go, the more noise you get. Extended ISO would be the Lo and Hi settings, and are usually the equivalent of the next higher or lower native stops. In our example, Lo1 would be the equivalent of ISO 50, Lo2 would be 100, while Hi1 and Hi2 would be 12800 and 25600, respectively.  While they're equivalent to regular ISO settings regarding exposure, these settings push the boundaries of the sensor and may cause undesired effects. For example, in certain situations, Lo1 could have more noise than ISO 800, even though officially it's only ISO 50.

Other ISO settings: Many cameras these days allow you to limit how high of an ISO it will choose in auto mode. This is very useful, and is a great thing to take advantage of. If you know that anything taken with your camera above ISO 1600 has a horrible amount of noise, you may want to limit your auto ISO to 1600 max. Don't worry that if you do that, there will be situations where you'd get blurry pictures due to the shutter getting too long, as you could always jump into manual ISO for a while if the situation warrants it.

Some cameras (generally newer SLRs) take this a step further, and let you fine-tune your auto ISO settings to an insane level. For instance, on my Nikon D600, I could set a minimum shutter speed to work along with my auto ISO. For example, If I set my minimum shutter speed to 1/500, the camera will use the lowest ISO it can and still keep me under that shutter speed. And not only will it choose from ISO presets (200, 400, etc.), it will choose the precise ISO it needs to keep to that shutter speed - I have pictures that show ISO 633, for example. It goes even further - the longer your lens, the shorter your shutter speed has to be, all things being equal. This will be discussed at length, but for now let's just say that the longer lens magnifies blur which would usually be invisible using wider lenses. Using these ISO fine-tuning settings, I could have the camera automatically adjust my minimum shutter - and therefore, my maximum ISO - depending on what lens is mounted. If your camera offers these options, I advise you to take the time and go through them. It isn't the simplest thing to set up, but once it is it'll save you an immense amount of time while shooting.

Exposure compensation:
This is one of the most important and useful features on any camera. This works in any program mode (P, A, S); some cameras allow it in other modes too. This setting tells the camera to shift every exposure up or down.

Let's examine this in more detail, and you'll see why you'd want to use this all the time. Imagine you're shooting outside on a sunny afternoon. The sun is behind you, lighting everything in front of the camera with a harsh, bright light. The camera looks at the scene, and decides on an exposure. (Remember that even if you choose the aperture for instance, it's still the camera that makes the decision on the overall exposure by choosing a shutter speed and ISO.) Now, the exposure may be "correct", but since everything is so bright, the colors are washed out. Lowering your exposure by, say, 1/3 stop should help keep the colors nice and vibrant by making everything very slightly darker.

There are two ways that you could make your camera do this. You could decide that the camera is not smart enough to lower the exposure a bit, so you switch over to Manual mode and dial in the settings yourself. You make the click, and voila!, the colors are all lovely. However, what happens half and hour later? The sun is a bit lower in the sky, so everything is a drop darker now. If you stick to manual mode, you'll now have to raise your exposure by, say, 1 stop to keep up with the falling light. Your other option is to switch back to Aperture Priority mode, where the camera could adjust itself to the changing light conditions. However, you're back to your original problem - the "correct" exposure is too bright! You'd be dancing back and forth, futzing with your exposure over and over again.

But there's a better way. The minute you notice that the colors are washed out, all you do is engage exposure compensation, and set it for -1/3 stop. What's happening is that you're telling the camera, "Hey - I'm gonna leave you to deal with the overall exposure, and change it along with the light as needed. However, whatever you do, knock it down by 1/3 of a stop." Now, you don't have to deal with changing the exposure, since the camera will adjust it when the light falls. However, now that you dialed in -1/3 exposure compensation, the colors will come out correctly too!

Exposure compensation is an incredible tool in dozens of everyday situations. Take your camera outside tomorrow and take a picture of the snow. Look at the picture and you'll notice that the snow is grey, not white. And I'm not talking about the lovely, sopping slush New York is blessed with a day after a snowfall. Look at some clean snow - and you'll see that it's grey. Why? Because the camera sees all that white snow as bright white, so it thinks it's too bright and exposes lower than it should. This is a problem with all modern cameras. How do you fix this and have the snow come out white in your pictures? Wait for it......... Exposure compensation! Set it to +1 stop and watch every picture come out beautifully. (In fact the 'Snow' scene mode (if your camera has one) does exactly this.)

Going to the zoo? Try taking a picture of a bear and have it come out properly lit. Since the bear is a small dark object surrounded by a bright foreground and background, the camera will expose for the scene and not the little bear. Dial in some positive exposure compensation, and walla, the bear looks great.

So how does it work? That really depends on the mode you're in. In P mode, since the camera chooses both the aperture and shutter speed, so when you choose to compensate the camera will again choose which of the two (or combination thereof) to change. In A mode, since you choose the aperture, the camera has no right to change that, so it'll use the shutter speed to compensate. So if you dial in -1 compensation, it'll double your shutter speed. In S mode, it'd do the opposite and use the aperture to compensate.

Note that most cameras have an exposure compensation limit of +/-3 stops. You should rarely need to get even close to that limit; if your camera routinely exposes things 8 times as high or low (3 stops) as it should, you should probably get it checked out ;).
__________

All this is well and good if you have a camera that offers all these options and controls. But what if you have a simple point and shoot? Well first of all, the main reason why you should get a better camera (after image quality) is exactly this - the ability to manipulate and control everything. That being said, there are something every camera offers, and some things that the camera could be tricked into.

Auto, Scenes, and Program modes are offered by virtually every camera. The control possible in P mode varies greatly, but most will allow you to change the ISO and White Balance settings, as well as apply exposure compensation.

As far as controlling your aperture or shutter speed, your generally our of luck. However, now is a good time to explore your scene modes and use them for things they were not really intended for ;). Learn how your scene mode operate and you'll be able to trick the camera into doing stuff. For example, think about what Portrait mode does. Among others, it'll use the largest aperture available. Conversely, Landscape mode will use the smallest. That means that you now have a way to access both the largest and smallest aperture settings. Night mode will use a long shutter speed, sports a short one, etc. etc.
__________

In the next Exposure installment we'll dig into how the camera sees a scene, and what makes it make the decisions it does. You'll learn all about metering, and how to use the different metering modes to your advantage.
__________

Lesson Summary:

Automatic exposure modes:
- Auto: auto everything.
- Scene modes: Auto modes, but optimized for different preset situations.
- Smart Auto: a mashup of the tho others.

Program modes:
- Program: Automatic, but with the ability to change things as needed.
- Aperture Priority: You choose the aperture, the camera chooses the shutter speed and ISO.
- Shutter Priority: You choose the shutter speed, the camera chooses the aperture and ISO.

Manual modes:
- Manual: You choose everything, the camera does nothing.
- Bulb: Like manual, but allows unlimited shutter speeds.

ISO:
- Auto: The camera chooses the ISO setting.
- Manual: You choose the ISO setting. Some cameras allow a tremendous amount of fine-tuning.

Exposure Compensation:
- Allows the fine-tuning of the camera exposure decisions.
- Very useful to get better colors, and for tricky exposure situations.

- If you have a camera that doesn't allow this level of control, you could use some scene modes to try to replicate some of them.
- Some settings may simply not be possible.


Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 15, 2013, 02:50:12 AM
Awesome lesson once again!

I feel like I actually know how to use my camera now   (well, at least the basics)



Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on December 15, 2013, 08:58:55 AM
Again wow! I wish all my teachers taught like you...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on December 15, 2013, 11:21:14 AM
Again wow!
+++
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: HesderGuy on December 15, 2013, 12:40:30 PM
I just joined this thread and it is amazing!   I read it all in two sittings, and now have to do  חזרה
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ss8389 on December 15, 2013, 02:38:41 PM
Amazing lessons,  wow.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on December 15, 2013, 04:13:47 PM
Again wow! I wish all my teachers taught like you...

+1000

Although most of the stuff isn't new to me, it is very enjoyable to read. Thanks for taking the time to write this up.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 15, 2013, 04:18:06 PM
Again wow! I wish all my teachers taught like you...
+1
I learned more from 5 paragraphs here than from 50 pages of my camera's manual.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on December 15, 2013, 04:22:44 PM
Your first issue was trying to learn this stuff from you camera's manual...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on December 15, 2013, 04:32:37 PM
Your first issue was trying to learn this stuff from you camera's manual...
What was his second issue?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on December 15, 2013, 04:34:43 PM
Flipping through the manual a second time.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 15, 2013, 04:54:01 PM
Your first issue was trying to learn this stuff from you camera's manual...
LOL
Silly me thinking I would learn what all those buttons are by reading the manual.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 15, 2013, 06:08:04 PM
Lesson 5
 
Remember, click on the Wiki if you want to see only the lessons and not the other posts.
 
All about memory cards
 
While buying a memory card appears at first glance to be an ultra-simple affair, there are actually many factors to consider. Your choice of card can make a tremendous difference in your day to day shooting. Let's have a look at the numbers, standards, and features you should be aware of when buying a card for your camera.
 
Types of card
 
There are a few different types of memory cards on the market today. Generally the type you need will be dictated by your camera; if it takes an SD card only there's no way you could use a CF card in it. There are however a number of cameras that accept more than one type. Since the most common card by far is SD, I'll focus mostly on that.
 
Compact Flash (CF): These are the bigger, square memory cards. These days they're mostly used in pro cameras such as the Canon 5DMkII or the Nikon D800. The advantage of CF over SD is mainly in physical strength. While SD cards are prone to braking, a CF card is virtually indestructible. On top of that, they tend to be a bit faster than SD cards, meaning that any new jump in performance will appear in the CF market before the SD market. The one disadvantage with CF cards is that the socket relies on a series of pins, which are easily bendable.
 
Secure Digital (SD): This is the most common card type in use by far. If you have a camera, chances are it takes SD cards. These are smaller than CD cards (about stamp-sized), and are not as strong physically. I have an entire collection of cracked and broken SD cards flying around the house. The 'secure' part of the name refers to the read/write protection switch on the side. To be honest this feature is mostly useless, and only adds to the complexity, and therefore breakability, of the card.
 
SD cards come in a couple different flavors:
 
- SD: This mostly obsolete standard was for cards under 2GB. They could still be bought today, but why someone would is anyone's guess.
- SDHC (High Capacity): This is the most commonly used standard today, and covers cards from 2 - 32GB. Virtually every camera in existence supports the SDHC protocol.
- SDXC (Extreme Capacity): This is the newest SD standard and supports cards from 64GB all the way up to a theoretical 2TB. This uses the exFAT file system, and so will not work on some older computers. Most newer cameras will support SDXC.
- MicroSD: This is a tiny version of a regular SD card, and also comes in all three SD flavors. Due to its size it'll be more expensive than a comparable full-size SD card, as well as being very prone to getting lost. It is used in most smartphones, as well as some point & shoot cameras and video cameras (the GoPro for instance).
- SD cards also come in a veriety of wireless models. These cards will automatically upload pictures to your computer via Wi-Fi.
 
Memory Stick (MS): This is a proprietary Sony card, and is used only in their cameras. At one point this was a horrible mess with as many as 10 types of Memory Stick on the market, none of which was compatible with the other. These days Sony has cleaned this up, with only the Memory Stick Duo surviving. More importantly, Sony finally buckled and now all their cameras accept SD cards as well, so you could easily forget about this overpriced card and move on with your life :).
 
There is also the new XQD card, which so far is used only by the Nikon D4 camera.
 
Card Speed:
 
This is the most important thing to know when choosing a memory card. Today's cameras move a massive amount of information to the card every time you take a picture or video. If your card is not fast enough, you will have to wait for a couple of seconds after every picture, as well as when looking through your pictures on your camera. Video-wise, if the card isn't fast enough the camera will drop frames, which will cause your video to be choppy and jittery.
 
Unfortunately, card manufacturers try their best to confuse the bejiggers out of you with an overwhelming amount of different speed specifications. Let's have a look at all these specs, and what they actually mean.
 
The first thing to remember is that pictures and video require a completely different type of speed in order to work properly. With pictures, you're throwing a huge amount of data at the card in short, intense bursts. On the other hand, the video data stream is much smaller, but continuous. With that in mind, let's have a look at the specs.
 
Rated Speed - written as MB/s: This is the maximum speed of writing chunks of data to the card, and applies to photos only. Common speeds you'll find are 45MB/s or 60MB/s. This means that the theoretical transfer speed will be 60 megabytes per second. Why is this important? Take a Nikon D600. Each RAW file is about 28MB. That means that if I use a card rated at 30MB/s, I will have to wait a second between each picture. Now imaging I'm shooting continuous - if I take 8 pictures in about 2 seconds, I then have to wait 6 more seconds until the camera is ready to shoot again, since it has to finish writing all this data to the card. This means that I will keep on waiting, and keep on missing shots.
 
Now imagine I had bought a faster card - say 90MB/s. This means that I would never have to wait between pictures (since each picture will take about a third of a second to write). Shooting 8 pictures in 2 seconds, I would have to wait less than a second until I'm ready to shoot again.
 
If you have any newer high-megapixel camera, this should be the number one spec you look for. It will be the difference between taking pictures and forgetting that a memory card exists, and between getting stuck waiting all the time and cursing the card out for making you miss the shot yet again.
 
X Rating: This will be written as 400x, 533x, etc. This means the exact came thing as Rated Speed, and is a direct conversion. It is simply another way for the card companies to drive you nuts. Each 'x' is equivalent to 15KB/s. Doing the math, 400x will be 400*15=6000, which would be 60MB/s.
 
Class Rating: This will be written as Class 6, Class 8, Class 10, etc. This applies to video only. What this is the minimum sustained write speed. A class 10 for instance, will maintain a write speed of at least 10 megabytes per second. Currently, no standard camera exists which can take advantage of anything over Class 10. This means that if you have a Class 10 card, your card will always be fast enough to keep up with the video data stream being thrown at it.
 
UHS Class: Again, this is a direct conversion from Class Ratings. UHS-1 simply means 10MB/s minimum sustained speed, which we already know is Class 10.
 
So basically you have to look at only two specs: Rated Speed and Class Speed. The Rated Speed will tell you how large a chunk of data (photos) you could transfer at one time, while the Class Rating will tell you the minimum continuous (video) data speed.
 
Read speed vs. write speed: Another very important thing to remember is that the Rated Speed applies both to read and write speed. That means you have to be very careful reading the specs, as some brands (ahem Lexar ahem) have wildly different read and write speeds, and write only the higher number in big obvious text. For example, their 60MB/s Class 10 SD card is actually only 20MB/swrite, while the 60MB/s is only on read. This means that it's still quite slow in your camera; only transfers to your computer will be fairly fast. This is of course extremely misleading, so keep your eyes peeled.
 
Memory Brands
 
Does it matter which brand memory card you got? Heck yes. Memory is cheap enough these days that you could afford to buy the best; saving $10 to go with a lesser brand in absolutely not worth it. Behold:
 
Chip Quality: At the very basic level of a memory card sits the humble silicon chip. These chips start their life as a large, circular wafer around 18" in diameter. This wafer is subsequently cut into a couple dozen square or rectangular memory modules. Due to the manufacturing processes, the closer to the center of the wafer the module comes from, the more perfect and free of defects it will be. Since flash memory is a commodity market, there are two or three companies which control most of it. These companies will take the highest quality center modules for themselves (or their partners), and let the little fish scramble for the inferior, cheaper ones.
 
What all this means for you is simple: The higher priced memory cards are priced like that for a reason: they use the highest quality chips. End of story. Sandisk and Lexar are on the top, followed very closely by Sony and Panasonic. Kingston is somewhere in the middle, and companies like Transcend are just about on the bottom of the food chain. The only thing lower are all the no-name brands - Dane-Elec, Wintec, Silicone Power, et. al.
 
Why do you need a high quality chip? Because a cheap one will eat your pictures one day. They are prone to getting corrupted and can't be erased and reused too often before they start to deteriorate. Would you trust your pictures to the lowest common denominator to save a few bucks? Personally, I don't think it's worth it. Now mind you - I've had Sandisk cards conk out on me; nothing's foolproof. But after years of hearing first-hand horror stories from countless people, the simple fact is obvious: It's not worth it to cheap out on memory.
 
Claimed Specs: Very often, you'll find with the cheaper brands that their claimed specs are often inaccurate and are actually slower then claimed.
 
Physical Quality: Look at any Sandisk box above the Ultra level (which is just about all of them): waterproof, temperature proof, and shock proof. I've put Sandisk cards through the wash and they work as good as ever. You won't find that with cheaper brands. Drop a card and chances are it'll break; leave it in the sun too long and it may not work again. The higher quality brand, the more the card will survive. Imaging coming home from vacation and finding that your full memory card cannot be read. With cheap cards, this is a far more common occurrence than with good ones.
 
Note that SD card are an inherently weak design and every one of them will eventually break. The difference here is how long it take until that actually happens, and if the data could still be read off it at that point. From my entire collection of broken Sandisk cards, all but one still technically work - that is, I could still read and write to them properly. Not that I'd want too; but the point is that I didn't actually lose any data when it broke.
__________
 
Lesson Summary:
 
Card types:
- CF cards are mainly used in pro cameras these days
- SD cards are the most common:
--- SD is up to 2GB
--- SDHC is 2 - 32GB
--- SDXC is 32GB - 2TB
- MS is a Sony proprietary and could safely be ignored these days.
 
Specs:
- Rated Speed gives you the maximum read/write speed in MB/s. Used for pictures only.
- X Rating gives you the exact same thing as 300x, 400x, etc. Multiply by 15 to get the MB/s.
- Class Rating gives you the minimum sustained data stream as 1 per class. Class 8 is 8MB/s, Class 10 is 10MB/s, etc. Used for video only.
- UHS Rating gives you the exact same thing as Class. UHS-1 is the same as Class 10.
- Be vigilant and check both the read and write speeds. They may be very different from each other.
 
Brands:
- Cheaper brands use cheaper, lower quality chips.
- Lower quality chips are very prone to failure.
- Cheap brands often fudge their numbers so their cards appear faster.
- Cheaper cards are often physically weaker and may break earlier.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 15, 2013, 06:32:51 PM
@ Centro & Achas Veachas - the latest lesson is dedicated to you ;D ;).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on December 15, 2013, 08:01:01 PM
@ Centro & Achas Veachas - the latest lesson is dedicated to you ;D ;).
;D I do appreciate it!

Didn't get yet to read it, but I'll put it on חזקה that I'll definitely enjoy it!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zevwolf on December 15, 2013, 08:11:11 PM
Thank's a MILLION!!! Keep going.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on December 15, 2013, 08:19:50 PM
Great job Something Fishy, thanks!

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on December 15, 2013, 08:45:49 PM
@ Centro & Achas Veachas - the latest lesson is dedicated to you ;D ;).

I'm so touched lol as always a great lesson!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 16, 2013, 01:55:00 PM
Great lessons!!
Now that I have my nex I can actually understand somewhat what your talking about and try to aply...
Thank you!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 16, 2013, 09:19:56 PM
Great lessons!!
Now that I have my nex I can actually understand somewhat what your talking about and try to aply...
Thank you!

Pleasure.

Make sure to post some pics of your newborn!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 17, 2013, 11:16:07 AM
Pleasure.

Make sure to post some pics of your newborn!
:)
First I took weren't that great,
And then he's been pretty cranky these days for me to get a good "photo session" with him (each pic takes me time while figuring out the camera),
And your first rule was "make sure he's in a good mood"
But I didn't give up yet!
He's just starting to smile, so hoping for some good shots when I get the chance...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 17, 2013, 11:22:13 AM
:)
First I took weren't that great,
And then he's been pretty cranky these days for me to get a good "photo session" with him (each pic takes me time while figuring out the camera),
And your first rule was "make sure he's in a good mood"
But I didn't give up yet!
He's just starting to smile, so hoping for some good shots when I get the chance...

Don't figure out the camera and lighting while he's waiting. Use a large teddy bear instead and only bring him in when you're ready.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 17, 2013, 12:52:50 PM
ok took something,
how to I upload it onto here?
too big i think..
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on December 17, 2013, 12:58:16 PM
Host elsewhere and link to it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 17, 2013, 01:00:41 PM
Host elsewhere and link to it.
Thanks,
You know of a good place to do this offhand?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 17, 2013, 01:02:43 PM
Thanks,
You know of a good place to do this offhand?

Flickr, Image Shack, Imgur...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on December 17, 2013, 01:03:07 PM
Thanks,
You know of a good place to do this offhand?
? (http://imageshack.us)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 17, 2013, 01:21:14 PM
Great, thanks!
This is what I was able to get for first time at night with the bad lighting in my apartment,

please give feedback and pointers for improvement ...

https://imageshack.com/a/PxRb/1
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 17, 2013, 01:49:08 PM
Great, thanks!
This is what I was able to get for first time at night with the bad lighting in my apartment,

please give feedback and pointers for improvement ...

https://imageshack.com/a/PxRb/1

I'll wait until I'm home and could see them on a proper screen before I check them out.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on December 17, 2013, 09:39:13 PM
Where does PNY fit in terms of quality?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 17, 2013, 09:54:03 PM
Where does PNY fit in terms of quality?

Relatively low. Sandisk and Lexar are on sale very often (like 32gb for $18), so there's no real reason to go with the lesser brands.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: aussiebochur on December 17, 2013, 10:54:17 PM
http://photocontest.lonelyplanet.com/competition/581/beautiful-world

Looks pretty cool!
Think we can get a DDF winner? :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 18, 2013, 01:31:06 AM
Relatively low. Sandisk and Lexar are on sale very often (like 32gb for $18), so there's no real reason to go with the lesser brands.
How about Sony?
Does it make any sense to get it over others because you have a Sony camera?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 01:43:59 AM
Great, thanks!
This is what I was able to get for first time at night with the bad lighting in my apartment,

please give feedback and pointers for improvement ...

https://imageshack.com/a/PxRb/1

The pictures are not bad - very nice for a first try, actually.

I like the middle one best for a few reasons:
- You're at his eye level. This is a vital part of shooting portraits. We're all used to seeing babies from the top down; the fact that you're on his level invites a feeling of intimacy, which makes for a very compelling photo.
- The top half of his face isn't hidden in shadow. The hat is takkeh very cute, but you have to take into consideration its effect on the picture. In the other two pictures, it casts a deep shadow over his eyes, taking away a lot of the feeling.

I also like that you didn't stick him in the dead center of the photos, which adds a nice balance. If you notice he's looking toward the left (his right), into the open area of the picture (this is called 'negative space'). This is great, as it conveys a feeling of openness and airiness. If he's been looking in the opposite direction, his gaze would bang into the edge of the frame and would make for a more uncomfortable and trapped feeling. (Of course when people look at a picture they don't generally notice feelings of 'openness' or 'being trapped'. But these feelings are felt subconsciously, and makes the difference between a picture that 'feels right' and one that doesn't. As photographers when we take a portrait it's out job to notice these things and use them to manipulate our viewer to have the feeling we want.)

You also have to keep an eye on the little details, especially around the edge of the frame. See how you left a perfect amount of space between his left elbow and the edge? That's great. But look at the bottom - you just cut off his finger. Make sure to practice 'border patrol', or else leave a bit more space than you think and crop later if needed.

And the main thing is the lighting. At night with bad lighting is definitely not the best time to do it. You could see that the colors are off, and there's a fair amount of noise due to high ISOs. If you would have done the exact same setup during the day by a window if would have been world apart.

But overall pretty nice pictures of a very cute boy ;).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 01:45:22 AM
How about Sony?
Does it make any sense to get it over others because you have a Sony camera?

No advantage whatsoever to go with a Sony card because you have a Sony camera. In any case the Sony cards are quite good, so no worries.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 18, 2013, 02:10:18 AM
The pictures are not bad - very nice for a first try, actually.

I like the middle one best for a few reasons:
- You're at his eye level. This is a vital part of shooting portraits. We're all used to seeing babies from the top down; the fact that you're on his level invites a feeling of intimacy, which makes for a very compelling photo.
- The top half of his face isn't hidden in shadow. The hat is takkeh very cute, but you have to take into consideration its effect on the picture. In the other two pictures, it casts a deep shadow over his eyes, taking away a lot of the feeling.

I also like that you didn't stick him in the dead center of the photos, which adds a nice balance. If you notice he's looking toward the left (his right), into the open area of the picture (this is called 'negative space'). This is great, as it conveys a feeling of openness and airiness. If he's been looking in the opposite direction, his gaze would bang into the edge of the frame and would make for a more uncomfortable and trapped feeling. (Of course when people look at a picture they don't generally notice feelings of 'openness' or 'being trapped'. But these feelings are felt subconsciously, and makes the difference between a picture that 'feels right' and one that doesn't. As photographers when we take a portrait it's out job to notice these things and use them to manipulate our viewer to have the feeling we want.)

You also have to keep an eye on the little details, especially around the edge of the frame. See how you left a perfect amount of space between his left elbow and the edge? That's great. But look at the bottom - you just cut off his finger. Make sure to practice 'border patrol', or else leave a bit more space than you think and crop later if needed.

And the main thing is the lighting. At night with bad lighting is definitely not the best time to do it. You could see that the colors are off, and there's a fair amount of noise due to high ISOs. If you would have done the exact same setup during the day by a window if would have been world apart.

But overall pretty nice pictures of a very cute boy ;).
Thank you!
Much appreciated!

So if I would take a pic by day with sunlight through the window (porch door) - how close/far should I be from the window?
Should I be facing the window, or the light come from behind me?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on December 18, 2013, 02:17:04 AM
if i could weigh in on the pics (i aint no professional though)

firstly, baby is very cute,

but in my opinion the hat ruins it. it takes up a lot of the head, but most importantly its not appropriate for the pic as its clearly an indoor picture yet he/she is dressed for the winter freeze, so it comes off as gimmicky/novelty (unless you were without heat or something)

just my opinion...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Let3 on December 18, 2013, 02:29:16 AM
if i could weigh in on the pics (i aint no professional though)

firstly, baby is very cute,

but in my opinion the hat ruins it. it takes up a lot of the head, but most importantly its not appropriate for the pic as its clearly an indoor picture yet he/she is dressed for the winter freeze, so it comes off as gimmicky/novelty (unless you were without heat or something)

just my opinion...
Well HE did just come home from the baby sitter, and it was freezing outside, so was still warming up...
(Also not much hair on his head yet, so didnt mind covering up a little..)
But I see what your saying..
Thanks for input.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on December 18, 2013, 02:33:59 AM
Well HE did just come home from the baby sitter, and it was freezing outside, so was still warming up...
(Also not much hair on his head yet, so didnt mind covering up a little..)
But I see what your saying..
Thanks for input.


it would appear that something fishy doesnt agree with me though, and he's the pro...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 08:40:00 AM
Thank you!
Much appreciated!

So if I would take a pic by day with sunlight through the window (porch door) - how close/far should I be from the window?
Should I be facing the window, or the light come from behind me?

Depends on the light. I'f it's very direct and harsh you should move back a bit, of is soft and sweet, you could get closer. Try different distances and see what works best.

The window should be on the side.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 08:53:27 AM
if i could weigh in on the pics (i aint no professional though)

firstly, baby is very cute,

but in my opinion the hat ruins it. it takes up a lot of the head, but most importantly its not appropriate for the pic as its clearly an indoor picture yet he/she is dressed for the winter freeze, so it comes off as gimmicky/novelty (unless you were without heat or something)

just my opinion...


it would appear that something fishy doesnt agree with me though, and he's the pro...

LOL.
1) First of all, just because I don't answer doesn't mean I disagree. It was 3 in the morning, you know :P...
2) You do make a good point - the hat is big and very slightly overwhelming.
3) But it still doesn't mean that you're necessarily right ;):

Often we remember the "feel" of a moment more than the moment itself (like when a smell or a song brings back long-forgotten memories). The memories of this time period in his baby's life will forever be linked to the record-breaking winter weather in J'lem. Looking at these pictures in years down the road he'll vaguely remember how cold and miserable it was outside, but hey! look at the baby - warm, cozy, and happy.

The hat (besides for looking very cute) serves to capture more than a record of the baby. It captures a moment in time, including the emotions.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jack12 on December 18, 2013, 08:59:30 AM
No advantage whatsoever to go with a Sony card because you have a Sony camera. In any case the Sony cards are quite good, so no worries.
Can you add the recommended (and not recommended) companies to the post about SD cards?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 09:12:41 AM
Can you add the recommended (and not recommended) companies to the post about SD cards?

It's always been there:

Sandisk and Lexar are on the top, followed very closely by Sony and Panasonic. Kingston is somewhere in the middle, and companies like Transcend are just about on the bottom of the food chain. The only thing lower are all the no-name brands - Dane-Elec, Wintec, Silicone Power, et. al.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on December 18, 2013, 01:51:03 PM
In my readings I see both SF and others show pictures taken with large aprtutres such as
this kayak shot (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/11112039104/)
taken with an f/11

or the below taken with an f/22. 
(http://www.problogger.net/wp-content/uploads/old/f-22.jpg)

When I am looking at lenses available i don't see anything over f/5-f/6 or so -Canon EF Lens Lineup (http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup).  Where are those apertures available, or is it just a setting on the camera that modifies the aperture on the lens? i.e. my t3i came with the 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 kit, so does that mean that the minimum aperture ranges from f/3.5-5.6 (i assume as you increase the zoom/focal length the minimum aperture increases), but then the camera itself can shrink that even further?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 02:11:33 PM
In my readings I see both SF and others show pictures taken with large aprtutres such as
this kayak shot (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/11112039104/)
taken with an f/11

or the below taken with an f/22. 
(http://www.problogger.net/wp-content/uploads/old/f-22.jpg)

When I am looking at lenses available i don't see anything over f/5-f/6 or so -Canon EF Lens Lineup (http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup).  Where are those apertures available, or is it just a setting on the camera that modifies the aperture on the lens? i.e. my t3i came with the 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 kit, so does that mean that the minimum aperture ranges from f/3.5-5.6 (i assume as you increase the zoom/focal length the minimum aperture increases), but then the camera itself can shrink that even further?

The apertures listed on the lens are the maximums. Using Manual or Aperture Priority modes on your camera (see my lesson on that), you could adjust them all the way down. Your lens for example could go to f/22 at the wide end and f/38 at the long end.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on December 18, 2013, 02:28:15 PM
In my readings I see both SF and others show pictures taken with large aprtutres such as
this kayak shot (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/11112039104/)
taken with an f/11

or the below taken with an f/22. 
(http://www.problogger.net/wp-content/uploads/old/f-22.jpg)

When I am looking at lenses available i don't see anything over f/5-f/6 or so -Canon EF Lens Lineup (http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/ef_lens_lineup).  Where are those apertures available, or is it just a setting on the camera that modifies the aperture on the lens? i.e. my t3i came with the 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 kit, so does that mean that the minimum aperture ranges from f/3.5-5.6 (i assume as you increase the zoom/focal length the minimum aperture increases), but then the camera itself can shrink that even further?

Yes. But the those are MAXIMUM aperture values, not minimum. Aperture is confusing. It refers to the size of the hole in the lens that allows light to be transmitted, and is adjusted with internal iris blades. However, the measurements are counter-intuitive, as the lower F-stop numbers mean a LARGER aperture. A F/1.8 lens, for example, lets in more light than a F/3.5. However, you can stop down the lens by closing the iris blades (usually controlled by a setting in the camera body unless you are using a manual lens), to make them both have an aperture of F/3.5. Stopping down the blades means increasing the F-stop number, but making the hole SMALLER.
I guess the easiest way to understand F-stop numbers is to consider it a measurement of how much light is LIMITED by the lens. The lower the number, the less restricted, more light goes through. The higher the number, the more restricted and darker (and deeper focus area). Every lens has a range of available F-stops, and while you can almost always stop it down and raise the F-stop value (minimizing your aperture), you can't go larger than the maximum stop which is printed on the lens.

If you want to see this in action, turn your camera to Av (aperture priority), and turn the scroll wheel to adjust the f-stop on the LCD. The lens won't actually adjust the iris blades until you take the picture, but there's a little button on the front of the camera under the lens release button. It is unmarked, and known as the "DOF preview" button. Press that, and the lens will snap into action to give a preview of what that aperture will look like when you take the picture. If you look into the front of the lens while you press and hold that button, you can actually see the iris blades stop down and make the hole smaller. Adjust the f-stop with the wheel and press the button again, you'll see it stop down a different amount.

Now, a manual lens such as a Samyang or Rokinon (or old vintage one) will have a ring on the actual lens to adjust the iris/aperture, just like there is a ring for zoom and focus on yours. Nowadays, we like everything to be automatic (or at least, some of us do) so the camera can determine what an appropriate aperture would be based on the light and settings you give it.


EDIT: DARN IT, I was too slow to reply. Fast on the draw, that Fishy.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on December 18, 2013, 11:24:07 PM
Thanks guys. I was confusing min and max-I was saying minimum f/stop when I really meant maximum aperture.

On another note (I'm sure it will be covered in a lesson at some point) what do macro lenses do differently than regular lenses, and can you take decent macros with a standard zoom lens?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 18, 2013, 11:27:31 PM
Thanks guys. I was confusing min and max-I was saying minimum f/stop when I really meant maximum aperture.

On another note (I'm sure it will be covered in a lesson at some point) what do macro lenses do differently than regular lenses, and can you take decent macros with a standard zoom lens?

They let you focus very close to the subject (relatively). There are ways to take macro shots with standard lenses (extension tubes, reversing rings, macro filters), but they're all limited in different ways, and don't compare to a real macro lens.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on December 19, 2013, 12:04:43 AM
They let you focus very close to the subject (relatively). There are ways to take macro shots with standard lenses (extension tubes, reversing rings, macro filters), but they're all limited in different ways, and don't compare to a real macro lens.
What is different about them that allows this in a macro lens as opposed to a standard telephoto lens with same focal length and Max aperture?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 19, 2013, 12:15:04 AM
What is different about them that allows this in a macro lens as opposed to a standard telephoto lens with same focal length and Max aperture?

With extension tubes you could only focus EXTREMELY closely (think inches), so it's only for extreme magnification (think bugs, not flowers). There is also hardly any depth of field (meaning hardly anything is in focus, only a drop. Much less in focus than a regular macro lens). You also lose a lot of light.

Reversing rings mount the lens onto the camera backwards, or mount two lenses nose-to-nose. This focuses only even closer (think snowflake), and there's even less DOF.

Real macro lenses OTOH act like regular lenses, plus they have the ability to get much closer than others. Therefore they are far more versatile, and allow you to shoot many many more things in macro as well as normally.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on December 22, 2013, 11:59:51 AM
When transferring photos from an SD card to a computer/Hard drive do I loose any of the photos quality?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 22, 2013, 12:15:35 PM
When transferring photos from an SD card to a computer/Hard drive do I loose any of the photos quality?

No.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 29, 2013, 06:07:33 PM
Just came across this :D...

(http://i.imgur.com/TzSUSnk.jpg)
Source (http://clickittycat.tumblr.com/)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on December 29, 2013, 08:05:36 PM
Just came across this :D...

(http://i.imgur.com/TzSUSnk.jpg)
Source (http://clickittycat.tumblr.com/)

WIN!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 09:21:12 PM
What causes the foreground the be blurred and the background in focus on an autofocus camera? So majorly annoying...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on December 30, 2013, 09:49:10 PM
What causes the foreground the be blurred and the background in focus on an autofocus camera? So majorly annoying  beautiful...
FTFY
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 30, 2013, 10:07:03 PM
What causes the foreground the be blurred and the background in focus on an autofocus camera? So majorly annoying...

Basically the problem with autofocus is that's its, shall we say, auto. You can't choose what it focuses on, so often it won't focus on what you want it to.

The trick is knowing how AF works, and using that to your advantage. The camera uses contrast to decide what to focus on. In your picture, the branches in the background have a sharper contrast than the flowers in the foreground. That means that the difference between the dark brown branches and the sky behind it is much more pronounced than the differences of the flower petals to each other. Since one thing is so much more obvious, the camera will choose to focus on that.

So how do you fix it? The trick is to find the most contrasty area of the flower - in this case, either the darker center - and try to get the camera to focus on these. Move the camera back and forth a bit, or even better, put that area dead center. You could also try blocking off the high-contrast background spots with your hand.

You'll notice that your shutter button is not simply a one-press affair. Press it slowly and gently and you'll see that there's a spot in the middle where there is some resistance. This is called a half-press. By pressing the shutter button only halfway to this spot, you are telling the camera to focus, but not take the picture yet. Once you have focus, you do what's called focus lock. Still holding the button halfway down, you then compose your shot. During this time you could move the subject off-center, or remove your hand from where it's been blocking the background. Once you're set up, finish pressing the button all the way down to take the picture.

Two important  things to remember:
- When moving the camera while holding down the button to lock focus, don't move the camera front or back, only sideways. This is because focus is based on distance. If you change the distance between the camera and the subject after focusing, you will lose focus. Moving side to side, however, doesn't change the distance, so you will maintain focus.
- Remember that sometimes a scene could simply have to little contrast for AF to work properly. The flowers you show are not quite so bad, but they're still very tough AF subjects.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 30, 2013, 10:09:10 PM
FTFY

+1000

Focus or not, it's a lovely shot.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 10:52:36 PM
Basically the problem with autofocus is that's its, shall we say, auto. You can't choose what it focuses on, so often it won't focus on what you want it to.

The trick is knowing how AF works, and using that to your advantage. The camera uses contrast to decide what to focus on. In your picture, the branches in the background have a sharper contrast than the flowers in the foreground. That means that the difference between the dark brown branches and the sky behind it is much more pronounced than the differences of the flower petals to each other. Since one thing is so much more obvious, the camera will choose to focus on that.

So how do you fix it? The trick is to find the most contrasty area of the flower - in this case, either the darker center - and try to get the camera to focus on these. Move the camera back and forth a bit, or even better, put that area dead center. You could also try blocking off the high-contrast background spots with your hand.

You'll notice that your shutter button is not simply a one-press affair. Press it slowly and gently and you'll see that there's a spot in the middle where there is some resistance. This is called a half-press. By pressing the shutter button only halfway to this spot, you are telling the camera to focus, but not take the picture yet. Once you have focus, you do what's called focus lock. Still holding the button halfway down, you then compose your shot. During this time you could move the subject off-center, or remove your hand from where it's been blocking the background. Once you're set up, finish pressing the button all the way down to take the picture.

Two important  things to remember:
- When moving the camera while holding down the button to lock focus, don't move the camera front or back, only sideways. This is because focus is based on distance. If you change the distance between the camera and the subject after focusing, you will lose focus. Moving side to side, however, doesn't change the distance, so you will maintain focus.
- Remember that sometimes a scene could simply have to little contrast for AF to work properly. The flowers you show are not quite so bad, but they're still very tough AF subjects.

I find that each time I half-click to focus- I find that the camera re-focuses when I click down all the way...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 30, 2013, 10:53:31 PM
I find that each time I half-click to focus- I find that the camera re-focuses when I click down all the way...

Shouldn't be happening. What camera?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 10:54:22 PM
Shouldn't be happening. What camera?

My old G11
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 30, 2013, 10:56:23 PM
My old G11

Weird. Are you on servo focus?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 10:57:50 PM
Weird. Are you on servo focus?

Not sure but I don't think so, I sold the camera a year ago... I was just going through some of my old photos trying to decide what to print for my home wall gallery.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 10:58:54 PM
Incidentally, I'm just wondering why the you don't consider the Canon 40d a pro DSLR?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 30, 2013, 11:19:51 PM
Incidentally, I'm just wondering why the you don't consider the Canon 40d a pro DSLR?

It's a prosumer camera, not pro one. Not bad at all, but still mid-level.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 11:24:22 PM
It's a prosumer camera, not pro one. Not bad at all, but still mid-level.

And what features make the 60d pro and not prosumer?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 11:25:38 PM
Not bad at all, but still mid-level.

Personally, I'm hating the 40d pretty badly.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on December 30, 2013, 11:26:42 PM
+1000

Focus or not, it's a lovely shot.

Thanks! And thank you for taking the time to explain about the auto-focus.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on December 30, 2013, 11:42:03 PM
It's a prosumer camera, not pro one. Not bad at all, but still mid-level.
And what features make the 60d pro and not prosumer?

The double-digit D cameras are Canon's prosumer line, a step above the Rebel class (triple digits) while still being consumer-oriented. If anything the 60D was actually a step BACKWARDS from the predecessor, as the 50D has micro-adjustments for focus and a weather sealed body. The 60D went plastic feeling more like a t3i than other xxD models.

More on Canon's lineup was described here:
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.msg660798#msg660798
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on December 30, 2013, 11:44:35 PM
Also on the subject of focus, I pointed out in the other thread that I actually like manual-focus for that reason- sometimes the Auto is too auto.

On the plus side, there are some nifty new touch-screen shooters out there these days, that actually let you touch the area of the screen you want focused for the picture. Pretty cool and useful instead of hoping the autofocus figures it out, but again as SF said, this requires the subject have enough light to determine proper focus (especially with constrast-based focus).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on December 30, 2013, 11:48:32 PM
On my T3i when using the viewfinder is there anyway I can control that red dot auto indicator left or right where it should focus or its just an indicator and it's not controlable?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 30, 2013, 11:50:15 PM
On my T3i when using the viewfinder is there anyway I can control that red dot auto indicator left or right where it should focus or its just an indicator and it's not controlable?

Sure it's controllable. But you have to get out of auto-everything for that. It should be called single-point AF or something similar (sorry, only know the Nikon nomenclature by heart ;)).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 01, 2014, 10:02:05 AM
I've been looking into flashes and was wondering if i specifically would want one with "TTL".  I'm sure it'll be covered in a lesson on flashes and such, but was hoping to get a preview?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on January 01, 2014, 10:45:23 AM
If I can only take one lens on a trip to the Alps where I will mostly be taking scenery shots what should it be? Also, in general for scenery shots what do you have the camera adjusted to? I know you can't say for each shot specifically...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 01, 2014, 11:30:22 AM
I've been looking into flashes and was wondering if i specifically would want one with "TTL".  I'm sure it'll be covered in a lesson on flashes and such, but was hoping to get a preview?

In one word, TTL flashes will be automatic (adjusting the amont of light output so that you get a proper exposure), while flashes without it will be manual only (you will have to change the flash power picture to picture).

So yes, when you're starting out you should definitely get a TTL flash.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 01, 2014, 11:34:46 AM
If I can only take one lens on a trip to the Alps where I will mostly be taking scenery shots what should it be? Also, in general for scenery shots what do you have the camera adjusted to? I know you can't say for each shot specifically...

A wide-angle zoom would probably be best. Those include the 18-55, 16-50, and 17-40, as well as longer ones like the 17-85, 18-135, etc.

There's no 'one setting' to use, but in general shooting in Aperture Priority and using smallish (higher numbered) f/stops would be ideal. Also try to keep the ISO as low as possible.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 02, 2014, 10:52:21 AM
Anyone know the a good photog magazine for beginners? Pop photography?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 02, 2014, 10:56:19 AM
Anyone know the a good photog magazine for beginners? Pop photography?

Pop photo is good, a bit more gear driven than technique driven. Outdoor Photographer is phenomenal for landscape photography.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on January 02, 2014, 04:26:10 PM
Wow.
http://twistedsifter.com/2013/12/over-under-water-photo-of-whale-under-boat/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on January 02, 2014, 04:36:39 PM
Wow, indeed.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on January 02, 2014, 04:44:21 PM
it looks to me like an optical illusion. theres no way the whale is under the boat. the water is too murky to capture it at such a distance
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on January 02, 2014, 04:48:49 PM
Wow.
http://twistedsifter.com/2013/12/over-under-water-photo-of-whale-under-boat/
it looks to me like an optical illusion. theres no way the whale is under the boat. the water is too murky to capture it at such a distance

I was gonna post that pic here last week and ask if it's real...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: alpicone on January 02, 2014, 04:49:49 PM
it looks to me like an optical illusion. theres no way the whale is under the boat. the water is too murky to capture it at such a distance

I don't know... He has some pretty cool pics: http://photos.justin-hofman.com/ (http://photos.justin-hofman.com/)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 02, 2014, 05:58:35 PM
Looks perfectly real to me. This was taken with a fisheye lens, which means that things a couple feet in front of the camera seem like they're much further away. That would account for the fairly good visibility in such murky water, since the whale is actually quite close.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on January 02, 2014, 06:24:07 PM
That would also explain why the whale seems so much bigger than the boat than it should be...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on January 02, 2014, 06:28:17 PM
That would also explain why the whale seems so much bigger than the boat than it should be...
that pic looks like a classic movie pic...

Looks perfectly real to me. This was taken with a fisheye lens, which means that things a couple feet in front of the camera seem like they're much further away. That would account for the fairly good visibility in such murky water, since the whale is actually quite close.
how do they get part on water part out of water? always curious abput that
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 02, 2014, 06:39:18 PM
how do they get part on water part out of water? always curious abput that

By keeping part of the camera in the water and part of it out.

Not all photography techniques are overly complicated ;).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on January 02, 2014, 07:16:29 PM
By keeping part of the camera in the water and part of it out.

Not all photography techniques are overly complicated ;).
lol. seems hard esp while in the water.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on January 02, 2014, 07:19:38 PM
Looks perfectly real to me. This was taken with a fisheye lens, which means that things a couple feet in front of the camera seem like they're much further away. That would account for the fairly good visibility in such murky water, since the whale is actually quite close.
so you agree that its not under the boat
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 02, 2014, 07:46:22 PM
so you agree that its not under the boat

Yes. It's close, but I don't think it's under.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on January 02, 2014, 08:04:13 PM
By keeping part of the camera in the water and part of it out.

Not all photography techniques are overly complicated ;) .
:)

I think the reason i thought it might not be real is because I (incorrectly) extrapolated from what I read  here (http://www.snopes.com/photos/natural/iceberg.asp) years ago that you can't get such a picture...
(or it may have been something else I read somewhere, but there was definitely something I read somewhere that made me think it would be a problem)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on January 07, 2014, 05:46:21 PM
I'm trying to get some shots of my boy, I'm outside, quite cloudy, I'm on AV (about 2.8) ios 100 and his face has no color, which part of the triangle should I start playing with?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2014, 06:29:34 PM
I'm trying to get some shots of my boy, I'm outside, quite cloudy, I'm on AV (about 2.8) ios 100 and his face has no color, which part of the triangle should I start playing with?

If the brightness is ok, exposure is not the issue. Sounds more like a white balance thing to me. Check if it's set to something weird like tungsten, then try manual or cloudy.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 07, 2014, 06:55:36 PM
If the brightness is ok, exposure is not the issue. Sounds more like a white balance thing to me. Check if it's set to something weird like tungsten, then try manual or cloudy.
White Balance is something that can also be corrected after the fact in lightroom or photoshop, correct?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on January 07, 2014, 07:03:07 PM
If the brightness is ok, exposure is not the issue. Sounds more like a white balance thing to me. Check if it's set to something weird like tungsten, then try manual or cloudy.
Here you go, the brightness was to the brighter, I hope this was the problem, a pity all those nice shots  :-[
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2014, 07:37:43 PM
White Balance is something that can also be corrected after the fact in lightroom or photoshop, correct?

If you shoot in RAW, then yes, 100%. Otherwise, it could only be tweaked a bit warmer or cooler before it starts messing up the picture.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 07, 2014, 09:05:12 PM
Will you agree that SOOC a jpeg is better than a RAW image?

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2014, 10:01:32 PM
Will you agree that SOOC a jpeg is better than a RAW image?

Sure, the same way a steak bought at the supermarket's take out counter is better than a frozen one from the meat department. You could eat it right now and it may even taste good, but does it compare to what a chef could do to a frozen one?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 07, 2014, 10:23:42 PM
Sure, the same way a steak bought at the supermarket's take out counter is better than a frozen one from the meat department. You could eat it right now and it may even taste good, but does it compare to what a chef could do to a frozen one?

Nice analogy!

So if you continue the metaphor- what would a fresh cut of meat in the chef's hands translate to?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 07, 2014, 10:27:44 PM
Sure, the same way a steak bought at the supermarket's take out counter is better than a frozen one from the meat department. You could eat it right now and it may even taste good, but does it compare to what a chef could do to a frozen one?

So unless you're planning to post-process (ex. family snapshots) it's better to shoot jpeg?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2014, 10:34:51 PM
Nice analogy!

So if you continue the metaphor- what would a fresh cut of meat in the chef's hands translate to?

This ;D:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7443/11829750785_0fce40b016_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/7VFP1E)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2014, 10:37:54 PM
So unless you're planning to post-process (ex. family snapshots) it's better to shoot jpeg?

It basically comes down to two main points - one is what you said, if you're not planing on post processing you should shoot JPEG. The second one is if you're in a very challenging situation - say, tough lighting. With RAW you could coax out at least another 2 stops of exposure from both the highlights and shadows without a problem, while if you shot in JPEG there's nothing you can do afterwards.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 07, 2014, 10:48:41 PM
This ;D:

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7443/11829750785_0fce40b016_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/7VFP1E)

Drool...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2014, 10:57:57 PM
This ;D:

Seriously though, here are a couple of screenshots of SOOC vs. edited RAW. The adjustments on these were nothing fancy; usually just basic exposure/contrast/color:

(http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5492/11829843755_ef6880e985_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/70n33R)

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2894/11830177743_6dc3d79af6_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/gxz7g2)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 07, 2014, 11:39:22 PM
But that is unrelated. Of course, edited (as long as it's done well) will be better than unedited.

Although those travel photos are magnificent!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on January 08, 2014, 02:19:38 PM
Taking pictures of my 11 month old son is difficult since by"h he's always moving. My camera is a cannon s110. Is there any reason not to shoot with high shutter speeds in RAW format so I can fix the brightness which is affected  by the high shutter speeds.
thanks in advance
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 08, 2014, 02:33:08 PM
Taking pictures of my 11 month old son is difficult since by"h he's always moving. My camera is a cannon s110. Is there any reason not to shoot with high shutter speeds in RAW format so I can fix the brightness which is affected  by the high shutter speeds.
thanks in advance

Yes, that should work.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on January 08, 2014, 02:44:10 PM
thanks for the fast reply
Is it worth getting adobe lightroom or just use the cannon software that came with my camera for working on my pictures
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 08, 2014, 02:46:55 PM
thanks for the fast reply
Is it worth getting adobe lightroom or just use the cannon software that came with my camera for working on my pictures

There's a 30 day LR trial, download that and try it out. I think you'll be hooked.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 08, 2014, 03:22:39 PM
Any major benefits of Lightroom over Photoshop?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 08, 2014, 04:26:48 PM
Any major benefits of Lightroom over Photoshop?
from the little I know lightroom has a simpler and more user friendly interface
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 08, 2014, 06:04:33 PM
Any major benefits of Lightroom over Photoshop?

- Photoshop: Full, extremely powerful program. Photography is just a part of it; there's also 3D, video, and many many other applications.
- Elements: Pared-down version of Photoshop. More geared toward consumer photography. Chances are it'll do everything you'd ever need.
- Lightroom: This is complimentary to Photoshop, but could easily be used without it. This is more of an organizational tool, with most of its power lying in the Library module. The Develop module is where you'd edit pictures, and is identical to ACR, which is part of Photoshop.
- Aperture: Basically the Apple take on Loghtroom.

So - if you have crazy numbers of photos to edit (i.e. you shoot in RAW, and often, Lightroom is probably best. You'd only use Photoshop (or elements) when you need some heavy editing on a picture here and there.

Also note that Photoshop includes Bridge, which is sorta kinda like Lightroom organization-wise, but not as fast or powerful.

You could get a Photoshop and Lightroom package at $10 a month now, which is a great deal.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 08, 2014, 06:11:09 PM
I have a problem with postprocessing- I never know when I'm done. Doesn't it feel like there is always something to tweak?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: caldig on January 08, 2014, 10:43:29 PM
these lessons are great!are there any books/websites on photography you could recommend?thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 09, 2014, 11:59:22 AM
Any recommendations on what would be a good forum to join, that's friendly to beginners and has a large knowledgeable membership?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on January 09, 2014, 01:34:21 PM
Only one I've been on is the photography community on G+. Dunno if it still exists or if it's as good- left G+ a year ago. Be nice, comment on others photos- and there you've got a whole network of people to comment, critique and explain. I started following somebody who is huge there like Trey Ratcliffe (even though his photography is totally not my style) and through the commenters I found the photographers who were most similar to my style.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on January 09, 2014, 08:03:22 PM
Taking pictures of my 11 month old son is difficult since by"h he's always moving. My camera is a cannon s110. Is there any reason not to shoot with high shutter speeds in RAW format so I can fix the brightness which is affected  by the high shutter speeds.
thanks in advance
Yes, that should work.
I've noticed that when shooting with high shutter speed that I get a lot of noise.  My ISO has not been over 800. Is there any way to avoid this while shooting with high shutter speeds indoors?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on January 09, 2014, 08:06:40 PM
Taking pictures of my 11 month old son is difficult since by"h he's always moving. My camera is a cannon s110. Is there any reason not to shoot with high shutter speeds in RAW format so I can fix the brightness which is affected  by the high shutter speeds.
thanks in advanceI've noticed that when shooting with high shutter speed that I get a lot of noise. Is there any way to avoid this while shooting with high shutter speeds indoors?

If you have kids buy an SLR.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on January 09, 2014, 08:13:10 PM
If you have kids buy an SLR.
why
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 09, 2014, 09:22:06 PM
If you have kids buy an SLR.
why

...beats me, I can think of plenty of reasons NOT to buy an SLR if you have kids! I'd say maybe he's implying that you wouldn't have that problem with an SLR, but that simply isn't true. ::scratches head::
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on January 09, 2014, 11:16:45 PM
...beats me, I can think of plenty of reasons NOT to buy an SLR if you have kids! I'd say maybe he's implying that you wouldn't have that problem with an SLR, but that simply isn't true. ::scratches head::
Think he meant that you will get good pics of your kids. Nothing to do with the kid moving. We all agree a DSLR can take a better pic than a P and S.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 10, 2014, 02:26:13 AM
Think he meant that you will get good pics of your kids. Nothing to do with the kid moving. We all agree a DSLR can take a better pic than a P and S.

Sure, its capable of taking better pictures when used properly, but there is a misconception that buying a DSLR automatically takes better pictures. And I believe that simply isn't true, in fact sometimes the opposite. There are some really excellent point-and-shoot cameras out there these days, many of which are capable of an excellent picture without the user needing to know as much as a DSLR shooter, and lenses that are condensed to be sharper and let in more light. In fact, I'd argue that for the average Joe who wants pictures of their kids, a DSLR isn't always an advantage at all and often a liability.

The S110 is a pretty decent option for what Bob is asking. Its no Sony RX10, but I think its one of the better ones as far as point and shoot cameras go. It offers a built in F/2.0 lens, which means your sensor is seeing more light than the kit lens on an SLR would out of the box. The sensor is significantly smaller so you don't get the shallow focus and high ISO will have more apparent noise, but wider F/stop means more light means you can in theory get away with a faster shutter speed than your average DSLR with a the kit lens (most kits starting at f/3.5). Combine that with a much more pocketable body that's ready whenever your kid is doing something cute, and I'd say Little Bob has a pretty great camera for the job. The recommendation that he buy a new camera just seems like an unhelpful response to someone who asked a technical question.

That being said, I'll do my best to help answer the question Bob.
If your pictures are coming out blurry because of motion blur (your kid is moving around too fast), the solution would be to turn up the shutter speed. That will naturally make the exposure lower because the shutter is open for less time and therefore not collecting as much light in the shot. So you'll have to compensate for that in any of the following three ways:

1) Open up the aperture more. If your lens is already wide open at F/2.0, you've already maxed out that option. The wider the aperture (lower the F-stop), the more light you're allowing in to brighten that picture up.

2) Raise the ISO. In the digital world, this is just raising the gain on the sensor. The problem with this, as you've noticed, is high ISO brings visible noise patterns with it. On a small chip camera, the noise is visible sooner than a large sensor, so don't go crazy with that.

3) Add more light to your scene! This should go without saying, but sometimes the obvious answers are the ones overlooked most. If you're shooting outside, this shouldn't be a problem. Shooting indoors, use a flash.

Also, don't set the shutter higher than you need it to be, that way you can save yourself from high ISO and wide-open-lens softness. I usually shoot around 1/60-100 for kids.  Good luck!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on January 10, 2014, 03:56:50 AM
Sure, its capable of taking better pictures when used properly, but there is a misconception that buying a DSLR automatically takes better pictures. And I believe that simply isn't true, in fact sometimes the opposite.

I disagree. When I bought my first DSLR, I was shooting mainly on Auto. My pictures were way better than anything I shot on P&S. You obviously won't get perfect and beautiful shots every time, but those easy shots (think outdoor cloudy) come out much nicer than P&S.

Paying for a really expensive P&S nowadays is simply not worth it given current DSLR prices (unless of course compactness is a major factor).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 10, 2014, 10:58:16 AM
I disagree. When I bought my first DSLR, I was shooting mainly on Auto. My pictures were way better than anything I shot on P&S. You obviously won't get perfect and beautiful shots every time, but those easy shots (think outdoor cloudy) come out much nicer than P&S.

I'm sure it did. But the word you are missing here is YOUR. Those easy shots came out better than YOUR P&S. I won't argue that most P&S cameras take less pleasing looking pictures than a DSLR, but also understand that not all P&S are created equal. A cheap point and shoot will have a slow lens (f/3.5 or worse) and a teeny tiny sensor, and in the case of some of my older ones, combined with a subpar image processor that lags when you hit the shutter and makes poor decisions on exposure and focus.

But there are some really good point and shoots these days- many of them sharing the same image processor as modern DSLRs (in fact, the Canon's new DIGIC 6 was released first in point and shoots only). The really super good ones may cost more than an entry level DSLR, and they are VERY MUCH worth the money if the complication of a DSLR isn't your thing.

The S110 is not the highest end point and shoot, but it was considered a pretty advanced model when it came out. The S120 is even better and opens up to F/1.8, but even at the S110's F/2.0, it means you can shoot in darker environments than your kit lens on a DSLR before you need a flash or other supplemental light, and runs the same Digic 5 chip you'll find in Canon's latest crop of DSLRs.

Quote
Paying for a really expensive P&S nowadays is simply not worth it given current DSLR prices (unless of course compactness is a major factor).

I disagree extremely strongly with that statement. What is it, exactly, about the single lens reflex moniker that makes it able to take better pictures?
Do you understand the science behind it?

Because I do. And this is something I've actually wanted an excuse to explain for a long time, so thank you for the introduction! (my apologies to Fishy, I hope I'm not stepping on any toes by jumping in here).

WHAT MAKES A DSLR PICTURE "BETTER"?

Is it the mirror? The actual mirror (which is what the term SLR is referring to) is there for ergonomics, it doesn't improve image quality in any way. It is what allows you to look through the optical viewfinder and snap pictures when it flips. If you take away the mirror, but keep the rest of the camera identical, your pictures will be identical. You'll just have to look at an LCD screen since the optical viewfinder won't exist to judge your frame anymore, and that's what a mirrorless camera is (also
known as EVIL, or Electronic Viewfinder, Interchangeable Lens). Granted, most mirrorless cameras also have slightly smaller sensors to make the whole thing cheaper
and more compact (micro 4/3, EOS-M, etc), but not all of them are. Sony, for example, has done amazing things to get the same APS-C sized sensor as most DSLRs on their mirrorless cameras while keeping the NEX bodies pretty darned close to the size of a point and shoot.

Is it the lenses? Having a choice in lenses is a huge pro to the DSLR system. If you want something sharper and faster, you can spend money on a Zeiss lens that opens up nice and wide. But most amateurs and soccer moms are likely going to stick with the kit zoom for most of what they do, and to be honest they are pretty boring. I see them like the sample cartridge that comes with a printer- its there so you can get started out of the box, but they don't actually expect you to use it for long.  In contrast, a point and shoot camera has a fixed lens that you can't remove. That means that they have to make it one heck of a lens though, because you are stuck with it. The cheap ones have lenses that are just as boring if not more so than a DSLR's kit, but the more expensive ones actually have some really decent glass that are sharper and faster than what you get with a DSLR's kit!
The Sony RX10, for example, has a constant aperture f/2.8 lens from Zeiss built into the body. Granted, this camera is not cheap, but equivalent coverage for a DSLR would cost over $2,000 in glass, likely spread between 2 lenses (since they don't make any single one with that kind of coverage). So far, all we've done is take away the mirror of an SLR and added an excellent lens. So far, if anything, we've actually IMPROVED upon the picture quality coming out of a cheap DSLR.

Is it the sensor? Ok, so here's a massive nugget of truth. DSLRs traditionally have larger sensors than your average point and shoot. This makes a difference because the larger the sensor, the more control you have over your depth of field. Also, the larger your photosites are, the more photons hit each one, making it brighter in low light and offering less noise in high ISO. But here's the tradeoff- when sensors are smaller, it is easier to have a wider aperture lens designed to hit it (this is the theory behind speedboosters for mirrorless cameras). A F/1.8 lens is going to project brighter light on that P&S sensor than a f/3.5 kit lens will on a DSLR, which in some small way tips the scales back the other direction. But here's the real kicker: not all P&S cameras have smaller sensors. In fact, the Sony RX1 has a fixed lens and no mirror, and fits in a jacket pocket, but it has a FULL FRAME SENSOR. That means your cheap APS-C DSLR has a 1.6x crop smaller than this particular point and shoot.

So if it isn't the mirror, and it isn't the interchangeable lenses, and it isn't the sensor, what makes a DSLR magically better than a P&S?
The simple answer is, it doesn't. Because they there is no magic involved here, only science.

The quality of your picture is most directly affected by a combination of the last 2 things mentioned above. Sensor size and lens quality, both of which you can find really nice equivalents to on a P&S these days. Granted, you are going to pay through the nose for a high end P&S, but in some cases it still ends up being cheaper than an equivalently equipped DSLR.

There. I can't believe I actually wrote all that out- whew!

Don't get me wrong, I love my DSLR and mirrorless cameras, they are way more fun to tinker with and when used professionally take excellent quality pics. But if someone isn't going to move past the kit lens, there are some very compelling P&S models to consider. But as is to be expected, if you are comparing your entry level DSLR to an entry level P&S, there is nothing to talk about.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on January 11, 2014, 11:05:11 PM
Mordy, you are raising an interesting point. Kind of like saying an entry level Mercedes is like a fully loaded camry plus the camry is already fully loaded. I get that. That being said an entry level DSLR on auto mode, is pretty hard to mess up. Plus you have the option of going further if you want to. So yes if a person will never add lenses or learn how to use it properly than a P and S with good quality could make sense, but I wouldn't consider it ideal.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 11, 2014, 11:46:30 PM
Mordy, you are raising an interesting point. Kind of like saying an entry level Mercedes is like a fully loaded camry plus the camry is already fully loaded. I get that.

Exactly- I had this conversation once with someone who switched to Mac and couldn't understand why I use both Macs AND PCs:
them: "But aren't Macs much faster? Why even bother with a PC at all!"
me: "Because you get a lot more processing power for your money, and they do the same thing these days"
them: "That's not true! My mac is like night and day from my PC! Ever since I got it a few months ago, everything is just so fast and wonderful, I can't believe I used Windows for so long!"
me: "Like what? What goes faster?"
them: "Opening Photoshop, for example"
me: "Hold on, how old is the PC you are comparing it to?"
them: "I dunno- 3, 4 years maybe"
me: "So, you are telling me that your brand new Mac is faster than your 4 year old PC, and therefore Macs must be faster and better than Windows?"

...this is unfortunately a perfectly rational and logical argument to the average consumer. I try something new, it works better. My $50 budget Vivitar took lousy pictures, but my DSLR takes beautiful ones.

Wash, rinse, repeat.

Quote
That being said an entry level DSLR on auto mode, is pretty hard to mess up. Plus you have the option of going further if you want to. So yes if a person will never add lenses or learn how to use it properly than a P and S with good quality could make sense, but I wouldn't consider it ideal.

Its a matter of personal preference. A full blown DSLR isn't good for everything- Plenty of my photographer friends have a high end P&S that they walk around with for daily use. You can't beat the pocketability and reach of the built-in glass without having to swap lenses on the good ones. It doesn't have to even necessarily mean you are sacrificing image quality. I leave my DSLRs at home when going out with the family (except for major things), because it simply isn't worth the hassle. I either bring a high end p&s or at least a minimalist mirrorless with a pancake prime. There are value in all of these.
Not that any of this is relevant, I was merely saying that when someone is asking for help getting good results out of their decent P&S shooter, saying "get a DSLR" is a less than helpful response. In fact, the same question would ring true of a DSLR- he wanted to know how to balance shutter speed with exposure, which is universal across all types of cameras.
I apologize for going off topic, I just felt some of that needed to be said to set the record straight.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on January 12, 2014, 12:00:58 AM
No need to apologize for going off topic. I, and many here on the forums, are always eager to learn whatever we can about cameras so it's always good to hear what you have to say. All I can say is I certainly don't mind if you continue to go off topic.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on January 12, 2014, 04:26:54 AM
But as is to be expected, if you are comparing your entry level DSLR to an entry level P&S, there is nothing to talk about.

That kinda sums up my point. Most people won't shell out a couple of hundred bucks for a high end P&S like the Sony RX. They walk around with a Canon Elph, or at best an S110. So, for someone that won't go off auto, is not looking to spend big bucks and doesn't mind the larger body, the entry-level DSLR is the better choice. Of course you could get that large sensor in a P&S, but you'll pay a nice premium for it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 12, 2014, 08:19:20 AM
That kinda sums up my point. Most people won't shell out a couple of hundred bucks for a high end P&S like the Sony RX. They walk around with a Canon Elph, or at best an S110. So, for someone that won't go off auto, is not looking to spend big bucks and doesn't mind the larger body, the entry-level DSLR is the better choice. Of course you could get that large sensor in a P&S, but you'll pay a nice premium for it.

The S110, as I explained above, is one of the better point and shoots from Canon. Better aperture and same image processor as their DSLRs.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on January 12, 2014, 09:06:56 AM
I went from an elph to Panasonic lumix gx1 (only paid $100, long story) and the difference is remarkable
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 12, 2014, 11:33:40 AM
I went from an elph to Panasonic lumix gx1 (only paid $100, long story) and the difference is remarkable
Nice- I'm a big fan of the lumix line (I have 2 of them right now, and I'm looking at a third one), but they technically aren't DSLRs. Slightly smaller sensor and no mirror. But man are they small and take great pictures... which is my point in all this. You don't have to have something branded with the SLR moniker to take great pictures.

As for it being $100... great deal! I usually recommend the Olympus E-PL1 for cheap mirrorless beginners because you can get a body refurbished around that price (and Olympus' color science is quite good), but that's the lowest I've seen a GX1. Throw some fast FD glass on that with an adapter, and you'll be taking far more interesting pictures than a DSLR with a kit lens. And spending less money than one, too!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on January 12, 2014, 11:58:38 AM
The camera was technically free. I paid $99 for the kit lens. Haven't bought any more lenses yet. Truth is through moving and construction I haven't used a proper camera in like three months. Should be done in the next couple of w weeks and hopefully I'll be able to find it
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sky121 on January 19, 2014, 09:14:08 AM
Since many of us booked some nice cheapo tickets to Hawaii is it possible we can get some tips for shooting there
?

Specifically sunrise/sunsets, the water, and mountains.


Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on January 20, 2014, 05:56:34 PM
Since many of us booked some nice cheapo tickets to Hawaii is it possible we can get some tips for shooting there
?

Specifically sunrise/sunsets, the water, and mountains.


What kind of camera?

Off the top of my head, if your camera supports RAW, use it there! The difference between the brightest whites and deepest darks are going to be super wide. There are some filters, such as Neutral Density or Polarizing that you can screw onto the front of the lens if your camera supports it (DSLR, etc) which will help keep the range of light more manageable to the camera.

Aside from the technical stuff, there's a lot of artistic composition. Rule of thirds, etc, but I'll leave that to Fishy to jump in because that kind of advice is really not mine to give. :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on January 21, 2014, 07:48:34 AM
Size and quality had been reduced a ton to upload here . What do you guys think? These were taken with pentax k50 18-55 kit lens at f3.5 ISO about 800 I think. Sutherland speed between 3 and 5 seconds
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: farvus nisht? on January 30, 2014, 05:02:19 PM
Thank You for your clear lessons, you really explain stuff clearly.
I got hold of a Nikon D3100 and want to take outdoor pictures of my children in the old city Jerusalem. I wanted to know if I should use aperture priority (the lowest is 3.5) and put the min. shutter speed at 1/60 to avoid blurry pictures due to movement, or use the setting for children?
In general do you have any other tips?
This will be my first time with a DSLR all thanx to you!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 04, 2014, 10:58:37 PM
When taking a picture of scenery (and want everything in focus) can it be assumed to use the smallest aperture that you have on the camera?

Conversely when taking a portrait with a desired blurry background is there a difference if I use a zoom lenses with a larger aperture (forcing me to move further away from the subject) vs. just using a regular lenses without zoom and increase the aperture to the lowest f stop?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 04, 2014, 11:32:50 PM
When taking a picture of scenery (and want everything in focus) can it be assumed to use the smallest aperture that you have on the camera?

Conversely when taking a portrait with a desired blurry background is there a difference if I use a zoom lenses with a larger aperture (forcing me to move further away from the subject) vs. just using a regular lenses without zoom and increase the aperture to the lowest f stop?

The smallest aperture will have the most in focus, but oftentimes you'll find that you don't necessarily need that. Try a slightly higher aperture (such as f/16 or 18), and check if everything you want is in focus. If it is then great, since you're limiting the diffraction that could happen with the smallest aperture. Basically use the smallest aperture that will keep everything in focus. Usually it'll be the smallest, but if you could go one or two stops less it may be better sometimes.

As for blurry backgrounds, both aperture and focal length play a role (as does subject to background distance and sensor size). Whether a larger aperture or a longer lens will give you more blur is very scene dependent, so you'd simply have to experiment. Or just get a long, fast lens ;)!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 05, 2014, 12:24:07 AM
The smallest aperture will have the most in focus, but oftentimes you'll find that you don't necessarily need that. Try a slightly higher aperture (such as f/16 or 18), and check if everything you want is in focus. If it is then great, since you're limiting the diffraction that could happen with the smallest aperture. Basically use the smallest aperture that will keep everything in focus. Usually it'll be the smallest, but if you could go one or two stops less it may be better sometimes.

As for blurry backgrounds, both aperture and focal length play a role (as does subject to background distance and sensor size). Whether a larger aperture or a longer lens will give you more blur is very scene dependent, so you'd simply have to experiment. Or just get a long, fast lens ;)!
Thanks for the info. Is there a simple way to know if everything is focus? If from the viewfinder everything looks clear can in focus can I assume that it is?

In regards to blurry backgrounds is there a general rule of thumb that a zoom lenses will increase the background blur?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on February 05, 2014, 12:49:20 AM
Thanks for the info. Is there a simple way to know if everything is focus? If from the viewfinder everything looks clear can in focus can I assume that it is?

In regards to blurry backgrounds is there a general rule of thumb that a zoom lenses will increase the background blur?
no - it does not have to do with the zoom lens -- either the autofocus vs. manual focus,
or the Aperture setting on your lens.  The 1.4 will give the sharp focus on your main object and intentionally make most of the backdrop blurry = "bokeh"
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sam123 on February 05, 2014, 01:36:23 AM
Hi

I didn't reed all posts, so if it's explained already please link me to it 

I need to take some product pictures, I bought a light box with some white lighting on amazon that has good reviews for photography, but I can't get the background real white. I tried to play around with the settings, but when the background gets so white, the product gets also to light..
I searched around, and it sounds that with the large photo studio's and large lighting, it's not hard to do it, but my question is if I can do it with the small light box.
Any help would be appreciated.

My camera Is the rebel t3i
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 05, 2014, 08:39:42 AM
Thanks for the info. Is there a simple way to know if everything is focus? If from the viewfinder everything looks clear can in focus can I assume that it is?

In regards to blurry backgrounds is there a general rule of thumb that a zoom lenses will increase the background blur?

Never rely on the viewfinder to check critical focus, it's simply too small. Plus the viewfinder displays at the largest aperture, so unless you use something called depth of field preview you're not seeing the aperture's effect anyway.

The way to do it is simply take a picture then zoom in on your LCD as close as you can go, and look all around the picture and see if it's sharp.

And yes, as a rule of thumb (all things being equal) longer lenses will create more background blur, especially when used properly (i.e. large subject to background distance).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 05, 2014, 08:43:48 AM
no - it does not have to do with the zoom lens -- either the autofocus vs. manual focus,
or the Aperture setting on your lens.  The 1.4 will give the sharp focus on your main object and intentionally make most of the backdrop blurry = "bokeh"

That is not correct. Aperture is one of four contributors to the amount is background blur. The others are focal length,  sensor size, and subject to background distance.

Aperture may be the biggest differentiator as well as the easiest to manipulate, but it is by no means the only one. 
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 05, 2014, 08:52:38 AM
Hi

I didn't reed all posts, so if it's explained already please link me to it 

I need to take some product pictures, I bought a light box with some white lighting on amazon that has good reviews for photography, but I can't get the background real white. I tried to play around with the settings, but when the background gets so white, the product gets also to light..
I searched around, and it sounds that with the large photo studio's and large lighting, it's not hard to do it, but my question is if I can do it with the small light box.
Any help would be appreciated.

My camera Is the rebel t3i

You'd think that shooting something with a white background should be one of the easiest things to do, but unfortunately the opposite is true. Making a white background appear white is far harder than it appears.

The "simplest" option is using a shooting table made out of frosted plastic or plexi, and light that separately from below. The other option (which I use for portraits) is lighting the entire background from the front with a completely different set of lights, with each light flagged or gobo'd off to prevent spill.

In either case, you'd need another light or two, and you'd have light your background at least two stops brighter than your subject.

TD;LR: It's not easy, and it probably can't be done with your lightbox in a practical manner.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sam123 on February 05, 2014, 10:02:30 PM
Thanks for your reply,
A shooting table is an expensive item?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on February 05, 2014, 10:03:40 PM
Why not just photoshop?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sam123 on February 05, 2014, 10:09:20 PM
A picture that's made correctly is much better than one that's need to be worked out afterwards.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on February 05, 2014, 10:11:06 PM
A picture that's made correctly is much better than one that's need to be worked out afterwards.

I believe that's highly debateable....

All depends on what you consider to be better.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on February 05, 2014, 10:12:54 PM
I'm saying you should shoot with technical accurateness- but you don't always need expensive accessories to get the look you want.
There are some things Photoshop is good for...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: sam123 on February 05, 2014, 10:14:16 PM
Maybe, will look into it
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 06, 2014, 12:01:48 AM
A shooting table isn't too expensive - see here (http://www.ebay.com/sch/Shooting-Tables-Light-Tents-/151226/i.html?_from=R40&_nkw=Shooting+table) for some good options. The main price differentiator is size (which obviously depends on what exactly you're shooting), whether it folds up or not, etc.

Sure you could do it in Photoshop. But it could take hours to select each background, and even then it'll not look natural unless you're a PS expert. Getting something like this right from the beginning is the way to go for sure.
Title: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on February 06, 2014, 05:43:38 PM
Off the top of my head, if your camera supports RAW, use it there!

If you have and know how to use software such as LR or PS (or others), definitely shoot RAW. Opens up the possibilities almost indefinitely, and can often help save a botched photo, or one that was just beyond the capabilities of the camera to capture correctly (like low light for example).

If you are not going to edit them anyway, shooting RAW just means bigger photos that will take more space on your memory card, and that you will anyway need specialized software to convert the RAW files into JPGs to make them into viewable photos.

The difference between the brightest whites and deepest darks are going to be super wide. There are some filters, such as Neutral Density or Polarizing that you can screw onto the front of the lens if your camera supports it (DSLR, etc) which will help keep the range of light more manageable to the camera.

I don't believe neutral density filters will reduce the dynamic range (difference between brightest and darkest pixels) of the photo, but will uniformly reduce the light captured by any given combination of values, resulting in a all-round lower exposure for the entire photo.

They can be extremely useful, but I don't believe dynamic range is their forte.


Aside from the technical stuff, there's a lot of artistic composition.

Totally!!

There are definitely rules etc to help with composition, but a huge part of it is simply paying attention to details.

Is there something in the frame that is distracting from the main subject that could easily be avoided by moving or zooming in a little?

Is there something just outside of the frame that could add to the photo if it were included?

Be present, and take a moment to stop and experience the scene before raising the camera to your eye.
What is making you want to take this photo? 
What might contribute to the image you are envisioning and what might distract/detract?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on February 06, 2014, 05:47:18 PM
That is not correct. Aperture is one of four contributors to the amount is background blur. The others are focal length,  sensor size, and subject to background distance.

Aperture may be the biggest differentiator as well as the easiest to manipulate, but it is by no means the only one.
+1
Yes, it's the biggest differentiator and the quickest and easiest to adjust,
and yes, there are other factors on the ground of course. That's one of the main ones.

There are some things Photoshop is good for...
+1,000
There are many many things that Photoshop is good for.  :)
In addition, over the years, I've found that the Apple program, Aperture, does a quick and easy job
with certain basic photo jobs - quick sliders instead of the multi-step PS.
Often that's quicker than trying to fix it in the original... (at time of photo shoot...)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 06, 2014, 05:59:19 PM
I don't believe neutral density filters will reduce the dynamic range (difference between brightest and darkest pixels) of the photo, but will uniformly reduce the light captured by any given combination of values, resulting in a all-round lower exposure for the entire photo.

They can be extremely useful, but I don't believe dynamic range is their forte.

You're confusing solid neural density filters with graduated ones.

A solid will uniformly reduce the light, while a grad will absolutely help control dynamic range. For example, balancing out a bright sky with a darker foreground.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: HP58 on February 06, 2014, 07:53:30 PM
Nu Fishy, when's the next lesson coming :) ?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on February 06, 2014, 08:29:26 PM
Nu Fishy, when's the next lesson coming :) ?
+100. They have been great. I have been reading Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" and have found your lessons as really great way to compliment it.

On a side note and excuse my ignorance here but after watching some YouTube tutorials on Lightroom I am not sure exactly what additional benefits photoshop will give me for most pictures? Anyone care to clarify? Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on February 07, 2014, 12:37:13 PM
You're confusing solid neural density filters with graduated ones.

A solid will uniformly reduce the light, while a grad will absolutely help control dynamic range. For example, balancing out a bright sky with a darker foreground.

^ Exactly. YG, there are some really interesting ones but they need to be screwed on to the lens with the right orientation to work. Its sort of like the way some sunglasses have a gradient from dark to light so you can see the ground clearly but the sky isn't blindingly bright at the same time.

A polarizing filter, however, can really pop DR in a different way.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 07, 2014, 12:57:21 PM
Nu Fishy, when's the next lesson coming :) ?

Working on it.... Wish I had more time to devote to this, though. I have so many things planned ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 07, 2014, 01:04:31 PM
+100. They have been great. I have been reading Bryan Peterson's "Understanding Exposure" and have found your lessons as really great way to compliment it.

Thanks ;D

On a side note and excuse my ignorance here but after watching some YouTube tutorials on Lightroom I am not sure exactly what additional benefits photoshop will give me for most pictures? Anyone care to clarify? Thanks!

For most people + most of the time, not much, really.

LR easily handles basic, everyday retouching. PS is good for very detailed, very fine work, like reliving people from a scene, content-aware full, etc. It also does the heavy lifting - layers, complicated things like transparencies, basically "serious" stuff.

But for everyday enhancements (color, contrast, exposure, etc.), LR is perfect. And it gets better all the time - local adjustments are now very powerful, and your could even do basic layer work through the free Perfect Layers plugin from OnOne.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 07, 2014, 01:35:24 PM
Had fun using photoshop on these pics I took in Bali. 1st time I tried anything so intense. I know it's not perfect.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 07, 2014, 01:45:33 PM
Had fun using photoshop on these pics I took in Bali. 1st time I tried anything so intense. I know it's not perfect.

Not bad for a beginner!

Happens to be I like the original better, it has more of a 'tropical rainforest' look due to the threatening clouds.

Also remember when doing such radical edits to go over the entire image with a fine-toothed comb to make sure that everything is consistent. For example here, the pools are reflecting a completely different sky ;D. Also, there's no way a bright sunny day could have produced such even, shadowless light.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 07, 2014, 01:49:25 PM
Not bad for a beginner!

Happens to be I like the original better, it has more of a 'tropical rainforest' look due to the threatening clouds.

Also remember when doing such radical edits to go over the entire image with a fine-toothed comb to make sure that everything is consistent. For example here, the pools are reflecting a completely different sky ;D. Also, there's no way a bright sunny day could have produced such even, shadowless light.
Thanks. That's funny about the pools - there's no way I would have thought of that. Glad you like the original better that's the one I am using for my photobook.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on February 11, 2014, 05:04:27 PM
argh, so apparently Photoshop CS3 doesn't support the t3i raw files.   >:( >:(

Should I just use the Adobe DNG converter or should I try getting a hold of CS5 (or 6) or lightroom?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on February 11, 2014, 08:37:30 PM
Thanks ;D


But for everyday enhancements (color, contrast, exposure, etc.), LR is perfect. And it gets better all the time - local adjustments are now very powerful, and your could even do basic layer work through the free Perfect Layers plugin from OnOne.

where can you get Perfect Layers plugin from OnOne for free?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on February 11, 2014, 09:41:03 PM
where can you get Perfect Layers plugin from OnOne for free?
Been meaning to ask SF, what this plug in does in particular? Been watching some YouTube tutorials on Lightroom (which I find not bad however I do wish they would explain more about the "science" behind it and not just what buttons do what) and haven't yet come across this one...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 11, 2014, 11:15:08 PM
where can you get Perfect Layers plugin from OnOne for free?

Dang it. Looks like they integrated it into their suite in the last update and it's no longer free.

Sorry :'(
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 11, 2014, 11:16:36 PM
Been meaning to ask SF, what this plug in does in particular? Been watching some YouTube tutorials on Lightroom (which I find not bad however I do wish they would explain more about the "science" behind it and not just what buttons do what) and haven't yet come across this one...

Cambridge In Color has some phenomenal articles digging into the science behind all this. Check out some of the articles on this (http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/photo-editing-tutorials.htm) page.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 11, 2014, 11:21:57 PM
argh, so apparently Photoshop CS3 doesn't support the t3i raw files.   >:( >:(

Should I just use the Adobe DNG converter or should I try getting a hold of CS5 (or 6) or lightroom?

You don't lose anything by using the DNG converter, except that you have to add a step to your workflow.

Adobe also has a CC photographer's bundle going on now which gives you Photoshop CC and LR for $10/mo (for both). Not a bad deal I think - I use it myself.


ETA linky (https://creative.adobe.com/plans/offer/photoshop+lightroom).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Lou Bob on February 12, 2014, 01:28:34 AM
Hi

I just got back from Hawaii and would like to share a few pics.
Lemme know what you think.
(taken from my awesome camera. My LG G2 phone)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/849/zr8o.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/690/lplz.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/833/z7ao.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/716/pru0.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/401/dn74.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/191/oo7o.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/845/gkvt.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on February 12, 2014, 01:48:29 AM
You don't lose anything by using the DNG converter, except that you have to add a step to your workflow.

Adobe also has a CC photographer's bundle going on now which gives you Photoshop CC and LR for $10/mo (for both). Not a bad deal I think - I use it myself.


ETA linky (https://creative.adobe.com/plans/offer/photoshop+lightroom).
I actually tried installing the lightroom 5 trial earlier today but apparently it's not compatible with xp...

I need to think about that $10/month, I'm not too crazy about the idea of paying for a subscription rather than the service...

 
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on February 12, 2014, 03:25:48 AM
Hi

I just got back from Hawaii and would like to share a few pics.
Lemme know what you think.
(taken from my awesome camera. My LG G2 phone)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/849/zr8o.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/690/lplz.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/833/z7ao.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/716/pru0.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/401/dn74.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/191/oo7o.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/150x100q90/845/gkvt.jpg)
it takes really small images...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Lou Bob on February 12, 2014, 04:36:59 AM
it takes really small images...
no, I must have put it in wrong.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 12, 2014, 08:30:49 AM
I actually tried installing the lightroom 5 trial earlier today but apparently it's not compatible with xp...

I need to think about that $10/month, I'm not too crazy about the idea of paying for a subscription rather than the service...

Nothing to think about then - Adobe CC requires Win7 or newer.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: davmtl on February 13, 2014, 01:41:38 AM
just read some of your articles, they are great! thanks a million!

on the topic of memory cards and their brands, i was always under the impression that Lexar is a low end company, after loosing connection abilities (can't connect to pc) of a Lexar USB stick some time ago, and hearing horror stories from others too. also price is usually way lower than Sandisk.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 13, 2014, 01:49:25 AM
just read some of your articles, they are great! thanks a million!

on the topic of memory cards and their brands, i was always under the impression that Lexar is a low end company, after loosing connection abilities (can't connect to pc) of a Lexar USB stick some time ago, and hearing horror stories from others too. also price is usually way lower than Sandisk.

My pleasure ;).

Re. Lexar, my article was about memory cards and the actual chips, which Lexar is tops at. The issue with USB sticks is something physical with the USB plug, so it has no bearing on the quality of their memory cards. Also, their memory cards are priced just about the same as Sandisk.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: davmtl on February 13, 2014, 01:51:58 AM
that was fast!
looks like you're a night owl
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 13, 2014, 01:54:05 AM
Hi

I just got back from Hawaii and would like to share a few pics.
Lemme know what you think.
(taken from my awesome camera. My LG G2 phone)

Not bad for a phone!

I like the sunset ones a lot:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/191/oo7o.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/401/dn74.jpg)

I can't decide between the two; both are nice in a different way. I'm leaning a bit toward the second one, I love the simple and mysterious black and white color scheme in the foreground and the clouds beneath the mountain.

Now about the others - here's the deal: they're nice snapshots. Meaning that all of them capture a 'moment' - the pool one captures the awesomeness of the hotel, the field captures the feeling of serenity (in fact the Windows background you mention is called "Bliss"), and the splash captures the action of the ocean in a great way.

From a photographic standpoint, they're not amazing. The light is harsh and flat on most of them (the wave does have some nicer light - looks like late afternoon?). The composition could also be better. For example the handrail in the pool shot is very distracting, and moving a bit to the left would have revealed more of the waterfall in the center:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/845/gkvt.jpg)

I also wish that you had left a bit more space on the bottom of the wave shot, so that I could see more of the foreground rocks, instead of just getting a hint of them:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/849/zr8o.jpg)

Imaging this field in the late afternoon - the grass and fence would have been glowing in beautiful sunset light. Moving a bit closer would have made the fence more prominent in the frame, and would have minimized the relatively boring sky. It would have been a completely different picture:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/690/lplz.jpg)

So overall, the sunset pictures are quite nice - I like them both a lot. The others are great snapshots - they encapsulate your memory of the time and place very well. A bit more fineness in the composition and some better light would have taken them to the next level, though.

Reminder: I'm not trying to criticize - only critique. There's a big difference ;) :D.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Lou Bob on February 13, 2014, 01:55:31 AM
Not bad for a phone!

I like the sunset ones a lot:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/191/oo7o.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/401/dn74.jpg)

I can't decide between the two; both are nice in a different way. I'm leaning a bit toward the second one, I love the simple and mysterious black and white color scheme in the foreground and the clouds beneath the mountain.

Now about the others - here's the deal: they're nice snapshots. Meaning that all of them capture a 'moment' - the pool one captures the awesomeness of the hotel, the field captures the feeling of serenity (in fact the Windows background you mention is called "Bliss"), and the splash captures the action of the ocean in a great way.

From a photographic standpoint, they're not amazing. The light is harsh and flat on most of them (the wave does have some nicer light - looks like late afternoon?). The composition could also be better. For example the handrail in the pool shot is very distracting, and moving a bit to the left would have revealed more of the waterfall in the center:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/845/gkvt.jpg)

I also wish that you had left a bit more space on the bottom of the wave shot, so that I could see more of the foreground rocks, instead of just getting a hint of them:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/849/zr8o.jpg)

Imaging this field in the late afternoon - the grass and fence would have been glowing in beautiful sunset light. Moving a bit closer would have made the fence more prominent in the frame, and would have minimized the relatively boring sky. It would have been a completely different picture:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/690/lplz.jpg)

So overall, the sunset pictures are quite nice - I like them both a lot. The others are great snapshots - they encapsulate your memory of the time and place very well. A bit more fineness in the composition and some better light would have taken them to the next level, though.

Reminder: I'm not trying to criticize - only critique. There's a big difference ;) :D.
ah, thanks  :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on February 13, 2014, 09:45:32 AM
Cambridge In Color has some phenomenal articles digging into the science behind all this. Check out some of the articles on this (http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/photo-editing-tutorials.htm) page.
Thank you. Website looks intriguing! Will be adding it onto my desktop bookmarks. Much appreciated!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on February 13, 2014, 10:58:44 PM
Is there a name or term for the quality of lighting or style in the photos on this blog? http://lingeredupon.blogspot.com/

There is something that I really like about them, yet I can't put my finger on it.

Is it just that the photos are naturally lit and very sharp?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SamKey on February 13, 2014, 11:35:09 PM
So @SF these (I believe I posted them before) were taken from a Motorolla Droid RAZR M
(http://i1330.photobucket.com/albums/w575/syk613/IMG_20140112_163007_060_zpss4werunb.jpg)
(http://i1330.photobucket.com/albums/w575/syk613/IMG_20140112_163359_844_zpsjorajecf.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: HP58 on February 14, 2014, 04:06:06 PM
Those are real nice! Wow!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 16, 2014, 10:42:23 PM
So @SF these (I believe I posted them before) were taken from a Motorolla Droid RAZR M
(http://i1330.photobucket.com/albums/w575/syk613/IMG_20140112_163007_060_zpss4werunb.jpg)
(http://i1330.photobucket.com/albums/w575/syk613/IMG_20140112_163359_844_zpsjorajecf.jpg)

Love 'em. It's amazing what phones could do these days.

Is this over Jamaica Bay?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 16, 2014, 11:18:49 PM
Went to shoot some birds today...

All pictures shot with a Nikon D800 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/842926-REG/Nikon_D800_D_800_SLR_Digital_Camera.html) and 200-400 f/4 lens (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/688212-USA/Nikon_2187_AF_S_NIKKOR_200_400mm_f_4G.html).

Northern Red Cardinal:

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3787/12580236715_1cdcb7872b_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580236715/)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7327/12580238785_93a47fa67f_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/0kw08Q)

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2823/12580706484_b33636220f_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/301eH9)

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3742/12580363183_90a07e4b92_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580363183/)

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2894/12580707374_2ff2ac25ff_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/A9EV8s)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7334/12580708884_272b12ccae_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580708884/)

Female:

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2842/12580246345_8980524cce_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580246345/)

White-Throated Sparrow


(https://s1.yimg.com/sj/2853/12580243045_7ef0235211_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/8e6JT9)

And then some different species:

Aeroloneas Argentinas A330 (flight 1301 to MEX):
(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3704/12580267245_1450f41a06_b.jpg) (http://hhttp://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/z558Pu)

Aeroflot CR9 (flight 1432 to ORD):
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7396/12580727194_32c8ffbc1d_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/2q3K34)

Cargolux 747 (flight 778 to MEX):
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7309/12580376613_47b1117ddd_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/32V062)

American 737-800:
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7392/12580736284_92a2aa37e5_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/874D1z)

United 757-200:
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7379/12580383403_da384695ca_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/AuS532)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Myccrabbi on February 16, 2014, 11:24:41 PM
Went to shoot some birds today...

All pictures shot with a Nikon D800 (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/842926-REG/Nikon_D800_D_800_SLR_Digital_Camera.html) and 200-400 f/4 lens (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/688212-USA/Nikon_2187_AF_S_NIKKOR_200_400mm_f_4G.html).

Northern Red Cardinal:

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3787/12580236715_1cdcb7872b_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580236715/)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7327/12580238785_93a47fa67f_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/0kw08Q)

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2823/12580706484_b33636220f_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/301eH9)

(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3742/12580363183_90a07e4b92_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580363183/)

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2894/12580707374_2ff2ac25ff_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/A9EV8s)

(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7334/12580708884_272b12ccae_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580708884/)

Female:

(http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2842/12580246345_8980524cce_b.jpg) (http://www.flickr.com/photos/morrishersko/12580246345/)

White-Throated Sparrow


(https://s1.yimg.com/sj/2853/12580243045_7ef0235211_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/8e6JT9)

And then some different species:

Aeroloneas Argentinas A330 (flight 1301 to MEX):
(http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3704/12580267245_1450f41a06_b.jpg) (http://hhttp://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/z558Pu)

Aeroflot CR9 (flight 1432 to ORD):
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7396/12580727194_32c8ffbc1d_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/2q3K34)

Cargolux 747 (flight 778 to MEX):
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7309/12580376613_47b1117ddd_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/32V062)

American 737-800:
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7392/12580736284_92a2aa37e5_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/874D1z)

United 757-200:
(http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7379/12580383403_da384695ca_b.jpg) (http://flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/AuS532)
gorgeous pic's!!!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ari9 on February 16, 2014, 11:37:17 PM
WOW
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on February 17, 2014, 02:31:10 AM
they look alive to me... (couldnt resist)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on February 17, 2014, 02:36:23 AM
they look alive to me... (couldnt resist)
+1
Yes, I thought of the pics on this thread of these birds (planes) when they used the "squawking" term in the airline hijacking articles this evening:

http://jpupdates.com/2014/02/17/breaking-hijacked-ethiopian-airline-landed-in-geneva-airport/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 20, 2014, 09:28:39 PM
Is it just me or are other people also seeing the recent posts with pictures in full size only that I can't seem to minimize? Makes the thread hard to read.

Perhaps we should start posting our pics in the thread for pics that you took (can't seem to find it), photography questions here and camera related questions in the which camera thread.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on February 21, 2014, 10:45:16 AM
Haha, the second pic of the Cardinal looks angry. I can hear the Hitchcock music as I stare at it.
Good stuff.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 21, 2014, 11:16:50 AM
Haha, the second pic of the Cardinal looks angry. I can hear the Hitchcock music as I stare at it.
Good stuff.

LOL. While I was shooting that I was actually thinking that all I need now is a slingshot and some nasty piggies :D.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on February 21, 2014, 12:08:06 PM
LOL. While I was shooting that I was actually thinking that all I need now is a slingshot and some nasty piggies :D.

Wow, that's a much better reference! Embarrassed I didn't go with that one. ;)

He even looks like the red bird!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 22, 2014, 07:54:57 PM
@ SomethingFishy how far away from the birds were you? It's incredible how much detail you captured.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 22, 2014, 08:21:38 PM
@ SomethingFishy how far away from the birds were you? It's incredible how much detail you captured.

Something like 30' for the ones in the trees, and probably 15' for the ground ones.

Mind you these are tiny birds - the sparrow is maybe 3", the cardinals 5" or so. Between the 36-megapixel D800 and the crazy sharp 200-400 f/4, I was even able to crop a fair amount and retain amazing detail.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 22, 2014, 09:00:00 PM
Something like 30' for the ones in the trees, and probably 15' for the ground ones.

Mind you these are tiny birds - the sparrow is maybe 3", the cardinals 5" or so. Between the 36-megapixel D800 and the crazy sharp 200-400 f/4, I was even able to crop a fair amount and retain amazing detail.
Incredible.  Looks like you are up in the tree with them.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on February 22, 2014, 09:53:24 PM
D800 and the 200-400 f/4
<I'm drooling big time>
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on February 24, 2014, 03:39:12 PM
I have a Nikon. What settings am I taking portraits on outside when its sunny?

I have been using A on iso 250 or so. (I forgot what shutter speed)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: srap on February 28, 2014, 03:18:06 AM
Oy.  AMAZING. Uh-oh.  I'm so excited!  These are some feelings now that I have just discovered this thread.  Where am I going to find (make?) the time to deal with this incredible resource? 

And all because of a DDF printer rebate deal (which can include a camera)!  I was trying to educate myself a bit before I posted a comment on the digital camera deal thread.  Looking forward to learning while plodding through your posts....
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on February 28, 2014, 04:46:46 PM
Incredible.  Looks like you are up in the tree with them.
yes, it does. Great, close photos!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: theberk on March 05, 2014, 06:19:13 PM
What do you think of this built in flash diffuser?
http://www.meritline.com/puffer-pop-up-flash-diffuser-white---p-53773.aspx
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 05, 2014, 07:08:07 PM
What do you think of this built in flash diffuser?
http://www.meritline.com/puffer-pop-up-flash-diffuser-white---p-53773.aspx

They're awesome, I've used them myself for a long time. Get a couple (at that price is a no brainer) since the bracket trends to crack.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 05, 2014, 08:20:10 PM
They're awesome, I've used them myself for a long time. Get a couple (at that price is a no brainer) since the bracket trends to crack.
What do they usually cost? Also assuming it will be compatible with my Rebel t3I?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 05, 2014, 08:35:24 PM
What do they usually cost? Also assuming it will be compatible with my Rebel t3I?

It's a knockoff of the Gary Fong Puffer which goes for around $25.

It'll work on all DSLRs.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 05, 2014, 08:40:42 PM
It's a knockoff of the Gary Fong Puffer which goes for around $25.

It'll work on all DSLRs.
Thanks - now it's on the way.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on March 05, 2014, 10:11:56 PM
What do you think of this built in flash diffuser?
http://www.meritline.com/puffer-pop-up-flash-diffuser-white---p-53773.aspx
They're awesome, I've used them myself for a long time. Get a couple (at that price is a no brainer) since the bracket trends to crack.
Thanks guys, I just ordered a couple.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on March 06, 2014, 09:49:34 AM
What do you think of this built in flash diffuser?
http://www.meritline.com/puffer-pop-up-flash-diffuser-white---p-53773.aspx
Cheaper here
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Puffer-Pop-Up-Flash-Diffuser-For-Nikon-D7100-D7000-D5200-D5100-D800-D600-D90-D4-/261234070347?pt=Camera_Flash_Accessories&hash=item3cd2c3934b
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 06, 2014, 11:48:11 AM
What about this guy http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lambency-flash-diffuser-clear-P4-dome-for-Canon-430EZ-580EX-/231174192949?pt=Camera_Flash_Accessories&hash=item35d30e3f35 (http://www.ebay.com/itm/Lambency-flash-diffuser-clear-P4-dome-for-Canon-430EZ-580EX-/231174192949?pt=Camera_Flash_Accessories&hash=item35d30e3f35)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/MTAwMFgxMDAw/z/e6cAAMXQVT9TD6qz/$_57.JPG)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: theberk on March 06, 2014, 12:02:12 PM
Cheaper here
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Puffer-Pop-Up-Flash-Diffuser-For-Nikon-D7100-D7000-D5200-D5100-D800-D600-D90-D4-/261234070347?pt=Camera_Flash_Accessories&hash=item3cd2c3934b

Darn, I overpaid $.09. Now I know for next time.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on March 06, 2014, 12:09:50 PM
2.99-1.80=$1.19. Might be time to brush up on subtraction.
Yes it's not the biggest savings but a penny saved is a penny earned. Kol shekain when it's 119 pennies.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: bsimchatomid on March 06, 2014, 12:40:28 PM
I'm hooked on this thread for a while now-I must say I really learned a lot. Thanks Fishy, Mordy and all the photography rookies for all your insight. I can't wait for the next lesson.

 I recently stepped up from my Canon SD1100 since I was unhappy with the indoor pictures. I was back and forth between the Sony NEX 3n and the Canon S110 ($200-$300 budget). My main concern was image quality in low light situations and I bought the Sony. I shot mostly on auto with the 16-50 kit lens and the pictures looked good on my computer. When I developed them I was disappointed with the amount of noise the pictures had and I didn’t even crop the pictures!  I went back to review the picture settings and I noticed that anything higher than ISO 800 was bad. I tried limiting the ISO but then I couldn’t get a normal shutter speed. I tried the built in flash but it makes a shadow. Is there anything I’m missing to get sharper pictures? Do I have to invest in a better lens for a wider aperture? Did I make a mistake by choosing the NEX?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: theberk on March 06, 2014, 01:30:58 PM
2.99-1.80=$1.19. Might be time to brush up on subtraction.
Yes it's not the biggest savings but a penny saved is a penny earned. Kol shekain when it's 119 pennies.
Yesterday when I posted the link Meritline had it on sale for $1.89.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on March 06, 2014, 02:15:18 PM
I'm hooked on this thread for a while now-I must say I really learned a lot. Thanks Fishy, Mordy and all the photography rookies for all your insight. I can't wait for the next lesson.

 I recently stepped up from my Canon SD1100 since I was unhappy with the indoor pictures. I was back and forth between the Sony NEX 3n and the Canon S110 ($200-$300 budget). My main concern was image quality in low light situations and I bought the Sony. I shot mostly on auto with the 16-50 kit lens and the pictures looked good on my computer. When I developed them I was disappointed with the amount of noise the pictures had and I didn’t even crop the pictures!  I went back to review the picture settings and I noticed that anything higher than ISO 800 was bad. I tried limiting the ISO but then I couldn’t get a normal shutter speed. I tried the built in flash but it makes a shadow. Is there anything I’m missing to get sharper pictures? Do I have to invest in a better lens for a wider aperture? Did I make a mistake by choosing the NEX?

First of all, thanks for the kind words. I think I get on Fishy's nerves sometimes (all in good fun), but I'm happy people are actually learning from our discussions!

Meanwhile, no- I don't think you made a mistake getting the NEX. Its a fantastic camera, but I think that kit lens isn't doing you any favors in low light.

If I'm not mistaken, at the widest zoom it only opens up to f/3.5, and if you zoom in it can be as small as F/5.6 (yikes!). That's actually pretty standard for a kit lens, but that also means you're going to have to rely on higher ISO and/or super slow shutter speeds, which equal grain and motion blur respectively. A larger sensor with larger photosites (such as a full frame Canon 5D) can push ISO without as much noticeable grain, but on smaller sensors you need to keep that ISO down.

While a smaller point and shoot camera may have granted you a faster lens (S110 opens up to F/2.0 on the wide end), investing in a faster lens to go with the NEX3 will give you much better pictures in the long run.

In my personal opinion, kit lenses are like the half-filled ink cartridges that come with printers. They're enough to get you started out of the box, but pretty soon you're gong to want to replace it with something better.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on March 06, 2014, 02:37:07 PM
First of all, thanks for the kind words. I think I get on Fishy's nerves sometimes (all in good fun), but I'm happy people are actually learning from our discussions!

Meanwhile, no- I don't think you made a mistake getting the NEX. Its a fantastic camera, but I think that kit lens isn't doing you any favors in low light.

If I'm not mistaken, at the widest zoom it only opens up to f/3.5, and if you zoom in it can be as small as F/5.6 (yikes!). That's actually pretty standard for a kit lens, but that also means you're going to have to rely on higher ISO and/or super slow shutter speeds, which equal grain and motion blur respectively. A larger sensor with larger photosites (such as a full frame Canon 5D) can push ISO without as much noticeable grain, but on smaller sensors you need to keep that ISO down.

While a smaller point and shoot camera may have granted you a faster lens (S110 opens up to F/2.0 on the wide end), investing in a faster lens to go with the NEX3 will give you much better pictures in the long run.

In my personal opinion, kit lenses are like the half-filled ink cartridges that come with printers. They're enough to get you started out of the box, but pretty soon you're gong to want to replace it with something better.

Can you recommend a faster lens (on a budget) that would be easy to use and understand for a starter?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on March 06, 2014, 02:43:41 PM
Can you recommend a faster lens (on a budget) that would be easy to use and understand for a starter?

I'm not as familiar with the pricing on NEX lenses, but the 50mm F/1.8 is usually one of the best starter lenses for low light. The Canon and Nikon versions of this lens are usually around $100, but it looks like Sony wants quite a bit more for their native one according to my Google searches. You could save a lot of money with a non-native one + adapter, but that isn't easy for a beginner anymore.
Maybe Fishy has some suggestions, since he actually owns and uses NEX cameras (its one of the few camera mounts I don't currently own a body with!).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 06, 2014, 02:57:53 PM
I've noticed that when taking pictures with the flash in the shoe on my t3i, even when I have the camera mode set to auto, and the flash on TTL, the pictures tend to be overexposed, and I manually have to step the exposure on the flash down anywhere from 1-3 stops. Is this normal? I have a yongnuo flash.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: avadah on March 09, 2014, 02:56:15 PM
I have the Sony HX50V and I see now that it's not such a good camera for taking pictures indoors of an infant because the pictures tend to come out blurry when she moves. Is there any setting I could change to help that?
Thank you.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on March 09, 2014, 03:06:04 PM
I have the Sony HX50V and I see now that it's not such a good camera for taking pictures indoors of an infant because the pictures tend to come out blurry when she moves. Is there any setting I could change to help that?
Thank you.
Try the action shot setting. Most P&S will have them. Should speed up your shutter speed.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: avadah on March 09, 2014, 03:26:52 PM
There is a setting for shutter speed. If I speed it up what should I set it to and what about the ISO?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on March 09, 2014, 03:36:44 PM
There is a setting for shutter speed. If I speed it up what should I set it to and what about the ISO?
Covered really well here. (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg652629#msg652629)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: avadah on March 09, 2014, 04:26:35 PM
Covered really well here.
 (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg652629#msg652629)
Thank you, and Something Fishy.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: bsimchatomid on March 10, 2014, 01:09:04 PM
First of all, thanks for the kind words. I think I get on Fishy's nerves sometimes (all in good fun), but I'm happy people are actually learning from our discussions!

Meanwhile, no- I don't think you made a mistake getting the NEX. Its a fantastic camera, but I think that kit lens isn't doing you any favors in low light.

If I'm not mistaken, at the widest zoom it only opens up to f/3.5, and if you zoom in it can be as small as F/5.6 (yikes!). That's actually pretty standard for a kit lens, but that also means you're going to have to rely on higher ISO and/or super slow shutter speeds, which equal grain and motion blur respectively. A larger sensor with larger photosites (such as a full frame Canon 5D) can push ISO without as much noticeable grain, but on smaller sensors you need to keep that ISO down.

While a smaller point and shoot camera may have granted you a faster lens (S110 opens up to F/2.0 on the wide end), investing in a faster lens to go with the NEX3 will give you much better pictures in the long run.

In my personal opinion, kit lenses are like the half-filled ink cartridges that come with printers. They're enough to get you started out of the box, but pretty soon you're gong to want to replace it with something better.

Thanks Mordy, actually you already made the toner comparison, it was one of my main hesitations knowing that I will probably have to invest in another lens which brings up the price of the camera. I did some research and came across this lens on ebay.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sony-E-mount-50-mm-f-1-8-OSS-Lens-for-NEX-cameras-NEW-SILVER-SEL50F18-/281281983627?pt=Camera_Lenses&hash=item417db6748b 
Is this what I'm looking for?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on March 10, 2014, 02:06:26 PM
Thanks Mordy, actually you already made the toner comparison, it was one of my main hesitations knowing that I will probably have to invest in another lens which brings up the price of the camera. I did some research and came across this lens on ebay.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Sony-E-mount-50-mm-f-1-8-OSS-Lens-for-NEX-cameras-NEW-SILVER-SEL50F18-/281281983627?pt=Camera_Lenses&hash=item417db6748b 
Is this what I'm looking for?

Yeah, that looks like it would work well. Looks like a great deal but its got 3 days left, I'm sure it will jump up in price at the end.

Sorry if I repeat myself sometimes- I moderate a film making forum and contribute to Q&A cinematography groups. I sometimes forget what I previously posted where.
I get asked the same questions a lot, so I should be allowed to repeat answers too. :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on March 19, 2014, 01:14:42 PM
Here are some of mine, the power of RAW!

(http://i.imgur.com/ZiSNe3t.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/RVNoE3E.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/qciWEgG.jpg)

(http://i.imgur.com/MeRz4Mj.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on March 19, 2014, 01:21:00 PM
OK, these are from a while ago taken with a T4I 18-135. I've since switched to a mirorless system (specifically Lumix GH3 (thanks mordy)).

Now I want these two lenses

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/865111-REG/Panasonic_H_HS12035_Lumix_G_X_Vario.html
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/768816-REG/Panasonic_H_X025_Leica_DG_Summilux_25.html

At some point down the road I would love to get these too

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1000625-REG/voigtlander_ba425m_nokton_42_5mm_f_0_95_micro.html
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/754598-REG/Voigtlander_BA305A_Nokton_25mm_f_0_95_Lens.html

Any corporate sponsors?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on March 19, 2014, 01:31:20 PM
Here are some of mine, the power of RAW!
Beautiful stills from the best videographer around!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on March 19, 2014, 02:02:49 PM
Speaking of raw... Is there ever going to be a lesson on raw:? Or is there one already?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on March 19, 2014, 02:35:21 PM
Beautiful stills from the best videographer around!
Raw means that you have access to the raw sensor data in post production. When you shoot a jpeg, the sensor sees the light and then processes it into a jpeg. In that process it throws away a lot of the data that it saw. Gives you an image that your computer can see without any special software and relatively small files but because all the raw data is "baked in" to the image, you won't have too much control over it in post.
When you shoot raw, the camera keeps everything the sensor sees, resulting in much larger file sizes and not worth it unless you actually plan to do something with them once you get home.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on March 19, 2014, 07:14:57 PM
OK, these are from a while ago taken with a T4I 18-135. I've since switched to a mirorless system (specifically Lumix GH3 (thanks mordy)).

Now I want these two lenses

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/865111-REG/Panasonic_H_HS12035_Lumix_G_X_Vario.html
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/768816-REG/Panasonic_H_X025_Leica_DG_Summilux_25.html

At some point down the road I would love to get these too

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1000625-REG/voigtlander_ba425m_nokton_42_5mm_f_0_95_micro.html
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/754598-REG/Voigtlander_BA305A_Nokton_25mm_f_0_95_Lens.html

Any corporate sponsors?
I would highly recommend the Olympus 12-40 2.8 Pro. I use it with my GX7 and it is an awesome combo. Also cheaper than the Panny lens.
I'm not sure if your camera has IS built into the body, if it doesn't then it may make sense to go with the Panny as the Olympus lens isn't stabilized.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on March 19, 2014, 09:20:02 PM
I would highly recommend the Olympus 12-40 2.8 Pro. I use it with my GX7 and it is an awesome combo. Also cheaper than the Panny lens.
I'm not sure if your camera has IS built into the body, if it doesn't then it may make sense to go with the Panny as the Olympus lens isn't stabilized.
that's the issue. IS on Panasonic is in the lens.
I do video for a living and my main camera is the GH3. I use a lot of manual lenses but I'm looking at these lenses specifically for photography and I want the stabilization...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on March 19, 2014, 10:09:36 PM
Raw means that you have access to the raw sensor data in post production. When you shoot a jpeg, the sensor sees the light and then processes it into a jpeg. In that process it throws away a lot of the data that it saw. Gives you an image that your computer can see without any special software and relatively small files but because all the raw data is "baked in" to the image, you won't have too much control over it in post.
When you shoot raw, the camera keeps everything the sensor sees, resulting in much larger file sizes and not worth it unless you actually plan to do something with them once you get home.


Thank you.
So all the software that one can use would be multiple lessons on its own?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on March 19, 2014, 10:37:23 PM
that's the issue. IS on Panasonic is in the lens.
I do video for a living and my main camera is the GH3. I use a lot of manual lenses but I'm looking at these lenses specifically for photography and I want the stabilization...
Ah gotcha.
My GX7 has IS built in so it works for me.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 19, 2014, 11:50:55 PM
Here are some of mine, the power of RAW!

First off - beautiful pictures. Very well done.

Couple of thoughts:

The pictures you uploaded were at full size, which means that they're impossible to see when they're embedded in the post - even zooming my browser out all the way still only showed part of each picture. I find that uploading a 1024px wide picture works well most of the time:

(http://i59.tinypic.com/71l3f4.jpg)

(http://i59.tinypic.com/2s1sqpx.jpg)

(http://i62.tinypic.com/28bzbs0.jpg)

(http://i59.tinypic.com/15qwvau.jpg)

I'm surprised that you weren't able to bring back the highlights in the parrots' faces in post. Unless the picture was overexposed by 4+ stops, the RAW file should have had the missing info. Otherwise it's a great, well composed picture.

The sunset I like a lot, but I wish there was some foreground to anchor it. A bit of beach, some rocks, or part of a boat would have made the picture much more immersive to the viewer. I also like the detail in the water, but I can't help but think that a slower shutter speed would have made for a more interesting shot - it would have blurred the waves and allowed the water to reflect more of the sunrise.

The waterfall picture is amazing, especially the detail in the rocks on the upper right corner. Again, a slower shutter would have made the water look better. The composition is fabulous, except for the very top - I wish you hadn't cut off the top of the right falls. The light is soft and lovely, perfect for this type of shot.

I love love love the Road To Hana picture. The muted colors is not a treatment you see too often in this shot, and I think it works really well. It's a great way to differentiate your picture from the many others taken from this spot. The composition is spot on - from the bushes in the foreground (love that splash of red!) to the tree framing the left. The horizon is a drop crooked, but not to horribly. Also, if you would have raised the camera a couple of inches higher, you would have separated the top of the foreground bush from the far beach to create a smooth, continuous flow, mirroring the road above.

The one big issue this picture has is halos. This is completely due to post-processing, and could (and should ;)) absolutely be avoided. It's mostly apparent where the center of the mountain meets the clouds, and where the mountain intersects with the horizon. There should be a smooth transition, not a glow. You could also see a bit of it in the one blue spot in the sky.

But again - it's still a lovely picture that I wish I had taken myself :D. The reason I'm harping on this one so much is because I really like it ;D

(http://i61.tinypic.com/6y2ihd.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 19, 2014, 11:55:32 PM
Speaking of raw... Is there ever going to be a lesson on raw:? Or is there one already?

It was covered briefly already, but yes, there will probably be a dedicated lesson on it in the future.

RAW: Many advanced P&Ss and all mirrorless and DSLRs are capable of shooting in the RAW format, as opposed to just JPEG.

What's RAW? When the camera takes a picture, the sensor captures a huge amount of data. It then passes all that to the processor, which 'finishes' the picture. It'll apply color correction, contrast adjustments, sharpening, noise reduction, and a hundred other things. When it's done it'll save the file to the card as a finished JPEG file, and throw away all the original sensor data. Usually, the camera is pretty good at figuring all this out and delivering good results. However, what if you want to make these decisions? What if the camera keeps on putting out pictures that you feel are too dark, or too vivid? Sure you could edit them in Photoshop later and try to fix it, but instead of working with all the data that was actually captured, your working only with the little bit of data the camera saw fit to include in the JPEG file.

This is where RAW comes in. Simply put, it's the raw data as captured by your sensor, with nothing thrown out by the processor. What this means is that you make all the decisions, not the camera. If you shoot in RAW you will have to edit each and every picture, since the camera doesn't do it for you. This is obviously quite time consuming - I personally have about 20000 RAW files waiting to be edited. The advantages are enormous though - since you're working with so much data, you could do amazing things which the camera would never have figured out on it's own.

Have a look at this picture below - the first one is how the camera decided it should look, and the second one is after I took the RAW file and made the decisions myself. There's no Photoshop wizardry happening here; all I've adjusted is exposure, contrast, sharpening, color, etc. - all things the camera usually does by itself. (The only 'Photoshopping' was removing the small (hardly visible) sign on the bottom left and the dark spot in the center.)

(http://imageshack.us/a/img577/9528/dsc6348.jpg)

(http://imageshack.us/a/img827/1185/dsc6348final.jpg)

Besides of the obvious issue of having to edit every single picture, there are some other drawbacks to shooting RAW. By virtue of the file containing so much info, the files are also HUGE - my Nikon D600 gives me less than 600 RAW shots on a 32GB card, compared to over 2000 JPEGs. And due to the large file sizes, shooting RAW is slower than JPEG. On mirrorless and DSLRs that's not so much of an issue as the cameras are built for that, with a P&S the slowdown will be quite noticeable.

Most cameras that shoot RAW also allow you to shoot RAW+JPEG - this is the best of both worlds, the control of RAW but the convenience of a ready JPEG if you can't or won't want to edit every picture. The downside of this is that it takes up even more space, and it's even slower.

In order to edit the RAW files, you'll need special software. The best RAW editor/converter is Adobe  Lightroom or ACR (Adobe Camera Raw, part of Photoshop). A camera that shoots RAW will usually include a basic converter too.

But in the end, there's a reason most pros shoot RAW full time - it just gives them more control and options.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on March 20, 2014, 12:21:39 AM
Thanks! There's a lot I wish I had know on that trip (like not splitting an image on the horizon line, using the foreground and getting a light tripod for slower shutter speeds).
Live and learn and one day I'll come back to some of those pictures and re-edit. I hope to make is back to the islands one day with more knowledge, experience and better equipment and we'll see what happens!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on March 20, 2014, 12:50:51 PM
I've since switched to a mirorless system (specifically Lumix GH3 (thanks mordy)).

Dawww, shucks. :)

I didn't realize you were part of this thread until after I realized who you were! Now I might have to go back and re-read with some new perspective... But I'm with you, man- those Lumix lenses are a real treat for video as a stabilized 2.8 zoom. But they are pricey, I can't justify buying one now either. Either way, this thread is mostly discussing photography so let's not confuse everyone by bringing our video discussion in too.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: beej on March 24, 2014, 12:35:25 AM
I'm no big photographer but I though these came out pretty cool coming from my Droid DNA...
(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/24/udyrebyp.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/24/udy8yhe8.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 24, 2014, 12:52:41 AM
I'm no big photographer but I though these came out pretty cool coming from my Droid DNA...
(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/24/udyrebyp.jpg)

(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/03/24/udy8yhe8.jpg)

Fantastic pictures, goes to show that you don't need fancy equipment to make great pictures. The light is sublime on both of them. I especially love how it looks like the wing is slicing through the sunset, with the bright area widening behind it. Almost looks like the sky is being painted by the wing.

If I could find something to fault it'll be extremely minor - I wish you had pulled back just a drop on the food, so that I could see all of the sauce and the tips of the fries. Or else get closer, and only hint at them. Also, try to keep your horizon or main subject out of the center (like in the plane shot), it'll make for a more dynamic composition.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: beej on March 25, 2014, 11:56:09 PM
Fantastic pictures, goes to show that you don't need fancy equipment to make great pictures. The light is sublime on both of them. I especially love how it looks like the wing is slicing through the sunset, with the bright area widening behind it. Almost looks like the sky is being painted by the wing.

If I could find something to fault it'll be extremely minor - I wish you had pulled back just a drop on the food, so that I could see all of the sauce and the tips of the fries. Or else get closer, and only hint at them. Also, try to keep your horizon or main subject out of the center (like in the plane shot), it'll make for a more dynamic composition.

Interesting points Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 30, 2014, 01:23:03 PM
For a safari I am looking into renting a lens for my rebel t3i. I am debating between a few different options. I prefer a low f stop so that I can use it well in low light situations such as dawn, dusk etc. and use a quicker shutter speed. Shooting from a vehicle I will have a beanbag however I don't have the most steady hands so I want IS.

Below are a few options I saw on Adorama. Prices are all before shipping, tax and insurance.

CANON EF 300MM/2.8L IS USM VERSION II  however I would need to also rent a camera as I don't want to be tied to a prime lens. 300 dollars.

CANON 70-200/2.8 L IS II  With the crop sensor on the camera perhaps this is enough? I wouldn't need to rent a 2nd camera this way and it's more within my budget. 140 dollars.

CANON 100-400 4.5-5.6 L IS  which is 100 dollars however is the aperture good enough?

CANON EF 200-400 F/4L IS USM 1.4X USA  which I had to mention although it's quite a fortune at 575. I don't get what is so good about it however I am sure that's due to my lack of knowledge!

Anything else I should consider? Thoughts? Thank you!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 30, 2014, 02:47:09 PM
For a safari I am looking into renting a lens for my rebel t3i. I am debating between a few different options. I prefer a low f stop so that I can use it well in low light situations such as dawn, dusk etc. and use a quicker shutter speed. Shooting from a vehicle I will have a beanbag however I don't have the most steady hands so I want IS.

Below are a few options I saw on Adorama. Prices are all before shipping, tax and insurance.

CANON EF 300MM/2.8L IS USM VERSION II  however I would need to also rent a camera as I don't want to be tied to a prime lens. 300 dollars.

CANON 70-200/2.8 L IS II  With the crop sensor on the camera perhaps this is enough? I wouldn't need to rent a 2nd camera this way and it's more within my budget. 140 dollars.

CANON 100-400 4.5-5.6 L IS  which is 100 dollars however is the aperture good enough?

CANON EF 200-400 F/4L IS USM 1.4X USA  which I had to mention although it's quite a fortune at 575. I don't get what is so good about it however I am sure that's due to my lack of knowledge!

Anything else I should consider? Thoughts? Thank you!

First of all you should absolutely positively take another camera. Rent one, borrow one, doesn't matter - even if it's a P&S. If you have a long lens on your T3i you will miss a tremendous amount of pictures. Even if you get the 70-200, the widest you could go is 112mm equivalent. That means no landscapes, no group of animals at a watering hole, no picture whatsoever if the animal comes right up to the jeep. And changing lenses in the jeep is NOT the answer - you will have a sensor full of dust and zero pictures. If you have a second camera - any camera - you keep a wide angle lens on there and you'll be covered for any situation.

Now as far as lenses - remember that on your camera you have to multiply the focal length of the lens by 1.6x. That means that the 70-200 will be 112-320mm, the 300 will be 480mm, etc.

The 70-200 is a fabulous lens and amazing in low light, but it's a quite short for safari shooting. If you go that route i'd recommend you also get the 1.4x teleconverter. On your camera, this will make the lens a 156-448m f/4 - you gain length but you lose a stop of light).

The 100-400 is a pretty nice lens, but I wouldn't suggest it for two main reasons - being f/4.5-5.6 it's quite slow. Your camera isn't the greatest when it comes to very high ISOs, so that's an issue. Additionally, the zoom mechanism on this lens is a push-pull, which means that every time you zoom out it sucks in air like a vacuum cleaner. On safari, this means that whatever dust is present in the air gets sucked in as well. The slow aperture combined with the potential for a large dust problem makes it not worth it IMO.

The 200-400 1.4x is a safari dream. The reason it's so expensive is very simple - it's simply the best lens money could buy. Overkill for you? Quite possibly. But gosh darn it, that lens is the only thing that makes me wish I shot Canon instead of Nikon. The focal length is amazing - 320-640mm. Te aperture is pretty good too, being f/4. If you want more reach, flip a switch and you instantly have a crazy 448-896mm f/5.6 lens. Best of all, it's sharp as a tack. You'd be able to count the hairs on an animals face. But of course, it's expensive and crazy large and heavy :D...

The 300 2.8 is also a great lens, but the fact that it's a prime will drive you bananas in the field. If you do go that route, get the 1.4x teleconverter too and you'll get a 672mm f/4 equivalent.

Couple more points - check out the new Tamron 150-600 f/5-6.3 (quite slow, but an pretty darn good lens with an amazing range - and cheap, too) and the Sigma 120-300 f/2.8 (another fabulous and fast lens). Also check out lensrentals.com and borrowlenses.com - I've found them to be cheaper than Adorama sometimes.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 30, 2014, 03:22:45 PM
Thanks for the incredible tips SF!!!!

Regarding a second camera I will have the Nikon Coolpix p7000 which has been my trusted camera until I got the t3i. I am going in migration season, so if I am lucky enough to catch it wide open panoramas of the huge herds will be in order. Not sure if I can trust my Nikon for that. Renting another rebel will only set me back another 75 dollars or so but then I need the wide angle lens (which I should probably buy either way).

Does the teleconverter have an off switch or once it's on the camera even if I don't need the added 1.4 x I will lose the f stop?

Agreed the prime lens will probably make me nuts, not being able to frame pictures or move in or out.

Going to look into the Tamron and Sigma options as well, quick researching online has the Sigma not focusing that well in low light. In theory the Sigma would be great as it's not that expensive and has everything I would need. Is OS and IS the same concept?

Thank you!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 30, 2014, 03:29:20 PM
Thanks for the incredible tips SF!!!!

Regarding a second camera I will have the Nikon Coolpix p7000 which has been my trusted camera until I got the t3i. I am going in migration season, so if I am lucky enough to catch it wide open panoramas of the huge herds will be in order. Not sure if I can trust my Nikon for that. Renting another rebel will only set me back another 75 dollars or so but then I need the wide angle lens (which I should probably buy either way).

Does the teleconverter have an off switch or once it's on the camera even if I don't need the added 1.4 x I will lose the f stop?

Agreed the prime lens will probably make me nuts, not being able to frame pictures or move in or out.

Going to look into the Tamron and Sigma options as well, quick researching online has the Sigma not focusing that well in low light. In theory the Sigma would be great as it's not that expensive and has everything I would need. Is OS and IS the same concept?

Thank you!!

1) The Nikon is a good choice. A Rebel would be better, but it may not necessarily be $75 better.

2) The teleconverter is basically a lens that goes in between your camera and regular lens, so when it's on it's on. You'd gain 1.4x and lose a stop. The only way to avoid that is to remove it entirely, which if course brings up the dust problem.

3) Both the Sigma and Tamron will focus slower than the Canon in low light.

4) IS, OS, VC, and VR are all trademarked names for image stabilization systems; all do basically the same thing.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 30, 2014, 03:42:01 PM
1) The Nikon is a good choice. A Rebel would be better, but it may not necessarily be $75 better.

2) The teleconverter is basically a lens that goes in between your camera and regular lens, so when it's on it's on. You'd gain 1.4x and lose a stop. The only way to avoid that is to remove it entirely, which if course brings up the dust problem.

3) Both the Sigma and Tamron will focus slower than the Canon in low light.

4) IS, OS, VC, and VR are all trademarked names for image stabilization systems; all do basically the same thing.
If the Nikon is a good choice then I will go with that. In the worst case I will change the lens on the Rebel in a clear plastic challah size ziplock so I can see what I am doing and avoid the dust. Is that a good option if I realize I will spend a few hours shooting wide angle shots?

When you mention that the Sigma and Tamron focus slower, is that something that should be a huge deterrent? Once the focus is locked in will it be able to track the animals? I read about Al Servo which is what I would use I guess.

Do any of these lens make a difference when trying to shoot in bursts to capture the perfect moment?

Thank you so much for all of your help SF, I really appreciate it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 30, 2014, 06:37:54 PM
If the Nikon is a good choice then I will go with that. In the worst case I will change the lens on the Rebel in a clear plastic challah size ziplock so I can see what I am doing and avoid the dust. Is that a good option if I realize I will spend a few hours shooting wide angle shots?

When you mention that the Sigma and Tamron focus slower, is that something that should be a huge deterrent? Once the focus is locked in will it be able to track the animals? I read about Al Servo which is what I would use I guess.

Do any of these lens make a difference when trying to shoot in bursts to capture the perfect moment?

Thank you so much for all of your help SF, I really appreciate it.

Unfortunately, Servo is where these lenses fall short (relatively). In single shot they'd focus fine, but they may have trouble tracking after being locked on.

Bursts are done by the camera and have nothing to do with the lens, but focus is still dependent on the lens. The Canons will do a better job at this.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 31, 2014, 08:24:07 PM
I have been doing a lot of research on the Sigma 120-300mm and it has amazing reviews. The only negatives I saw were on Nikon cameras at f 2.8 but all the reviews done on Canon were amazing. My decision has come down to either the 70 200mm with a converter or the Sigma.

For the Sigma at the 120 range times 1.6 does that mean I won't be able to use it for water holes or groups of animals?

Regarding the 70 to 200mm the only way I would go with it is if you thought it made sense to use the lens as is in low light at 200 times 1.6 and during daylight to add a 1.4 converter in which the f 4 wouldn't be much of an issue. I would need to take off the lens twice a day but I can do it in a large sealed ziplock to prevent the dust. My concerns would be the 320 mm w/o the converter in low light and how that would work out as well as your thoughts on adding the teleconverter in the jeep.

One last thing I was wondering is that you mentioned that I gain 1.6 mm on the lens due to the crop sensor. How it that different then a digital zoom on a P and S if the camera is simply cropping the image to make it look larger?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on April 27, 2014, 01:15:20 PM
I have been using the 50mm 1.8 recently and noticed that although I can blur our the background nicely at 1.8 it doesn't result in a total blur, (for example the pics of the birds SF recently posted.) In some of the pics I was close to the subject and the items in the background were far away and it still didn't help.

Can it be because the 50mm isn't a zoom lens or is it simply the limitation of the crop sensor rebel t3i?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on April 27, 2014, 01:57:19 PM
I have been using the 50mm 1.8 recently and noticed that although I can blur our the background nicely at 1.8 it doesn't result in a total blur, (for example the pics of the birds SF recently posted.) In some of the pics I was close to the subject and the items in the background were far away and it still didn't help.

Can it be because the 50mm isn't a zoom lens or is it simply the limitation of the crop sensor rebel t3i?

The former. The longer the zoom, the better the bokeh. I'll let SF give you the technical answer.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on April 27, 2014, 02:08:06 PM
The former. The longer the zoom, the better the bokeh. I'll let SF give you the technical answer.
True but he should be able to get some incredible bokeh with that lens regardless.

@Fan of Dan, do you want to post some examples?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 27, 2014, 02:14:24 PM
The 50 could give you some lovely blur, but don't expect anything close to my bird shots. Those were taken with a $10k+ 400mm lens on a full frame camera - no way a 50 on a crop sensor could compete.

So your best bets are keeping the subject choose and the background far, and of course keeping it at f/1.8.

Maybe post some samples so we could see if what you're getting is to be expected or not.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on April 27, 2014, 02:21:18 PM
The 50 could give you some lovely blur, but don't expect anything close to my bird shots. Those were taken with a $10k+ 400mm lens on a full frame camera - no way a 50 on a crop sensor could compete.
So your best bets are keeping the subject choose and the background far, and of course keeping it at f/1.8.
Maybe post some samples so we could see if what you're getting is to be expected or not.
Is that a $10K+ cost camera? Which one?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 27, 2014, 02:28:30 PM
Is that a $10K+ cost camera? Which one?

Nikon D800 and 200-400mm lens
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on April 27, 2014, 02:39:24 PM
Nikon D800 and 200-400mm lens
oh. Wow -- A $6K lens -- Looks heavy. Can you see people's faces in the windows of flying aircraft? (Or better - from the airplane onto earth...  ;) )
    When photographing, would take up the width of a seat. Nature's better... Hiking, Mountains, Islands, cruising. Nice.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on April 27, 2014, 04:23:28 PM
Here's a few examples. Only in the 4th shot of the flowers did I somewhat get the desired result and in the 1st the background is hardly blurred, just out of focus. All shots were taken at 1.8 ISO 100 with a shutter speed somewhere between 1/2000 and 1/4000.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on April 28, 2014, 11:09:23 AM
Hi. For a beginner, and wanting to start shooting in raw, is Adobe Elements enough? Or should I go for Lightroom? 

Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on April 29, 2014, 12:20:12 AM
Here's a few examples. Only in the 4th shot of the flowers did I somewhat get the desired result and in the 1st the background is hardly blurred, just out of focus. All shots were taken at 1.8 ISO 100 with a shutter speed somewhere between 1/2000 and 1/4000.
Bump - so what do you guys think about these samples and the backgrounds? Is this what I should be expecting?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2014, 12:43:12 AM
Bump - so what do you guys think about these samples and the backgrounds? Is this what I should be expecting?

Yes - they all look perfectly normal.

The reason you think the last shot looks best is not that it's blurred more - in fact it's just as blurred as the 2 above it. However unlike the frog ones (which I love, btw :D), the flower background has lots of light-on-dark detail. This lets the blur show up better due to the contrast. The frogs, OTOH, are on a pretty much uniformly colored background so the blur doesn't stand out so much.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2014, 12:47:00 AM
Hi. For a beginner, and wanting to start shooting in raw, is Adobe Elements enough? Or should I go for Lightroom? 

Thanks.

The engine behind Photoshop Elements is ACR (Adobe Camera RAW), which is the same engine that powers the develop module in Lightroom. What this means is that there is zero difference to the RAW processing between them.

The strength LR has over Elements lies in the organization and workflow tools, not the development. In fact for a beginner I'd suggest Elements over LR, since it gives you an almost-as-good-version of Photoshop in addition to RAW processing.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on April 29, 2014, 12:56:10 AM
Yes - they all look perfectly normal.

The reason you think the last shot looks best is not that it's blurred more - in fact it's just as blurred as the 2 above it. However unlike the frog ones (which I love, btw :D), the flower background has lots of light-on-dark detail. This lets the blur show up better due to the contrast. The frogs, OTOH, are on a pretty much uniformly colored background so the blur doesn't stand out so much.
Thanks - if you want I can send you over a frog or two!

That's a really interesting point you are making regarding the light on dark detail.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2014, 01:02:40 AM
Thanks - if you want I can send you over a frog or two!

LOL

That's a really interesting point you are making regarding the light on dark detail.

It's all about the contrast. Think about it: which do you like better - the top half or the bottom half? Even though both are just as blurry, the top half offers the visual contrast and interest which the bottom half doesn't.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on May 15, 2014, 12:39:16 AM
Just got Lightroom 5 - what is a good resource to learn how to use it? I mean from scratch btw... I am open to buying a good book etc.

Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 15, 2014, 12:45:16 AM
Just got Lightroom 5 - what is a good resource to learn how to use it? I mean from scratch btw... I am open to buying a good book etc.

Thanks

http://www.amazon.com/Photoshop-Lightroom-Digital-Photographers-Voices/dp/0321934318/ref=tmm_pap_title_0

That's the best book out there.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on May 15, 2014, 12:55:46 AM
http://www.amazon.com/Photoshop-Lightroom-Digital-Photographers-Voices/dp/0321934318/ref=tmm_pap_title_0

That's the best book out there.
Thanks, I am going to order it. Worth every penny if I can learn how to use LR!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lubaby on May 15, 2014, 12:59:10 AM
Thanks, I am going to order it. Worth every penny if I can learn how to use LR!
Throw in the referral tag for Dan to get a cut out of your spend :)

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0321934318/?tag=cl03f-20
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 15, 2014, 01:21:36 AM
Throw in the referral tag for Dan to get a cut out of your spend :)

http://www.amazon.com/dp/0321934318/?tag=cl03f-20

Good point. Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on May 15, 2014, 06:20:10 PM
Personally, I found Julianne kost's free tutorial videos online to be excellent. Starting knowing nothing, and while I am far from being a pro, I can do a decent job of getting a photo where I want it. I found her to be very very clear and not at all boring. . She has lots and lots of videos. Jkost.com
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on May 15, 2014, 06:53:56 PM
Personally, I found Julianne kost's free tutorial videos online to be excellent. Starting knowing nothing, and while I am far from being a pro, I can do a decent job of getting a photo where I want it. I found her to be very very clear and not at all boring. . She has lots and lots of videos. Jkost.com
Thanks. Already ordered the book but will take a look. I always enjoy watching tutorials online.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on May 15, 2014, 08:25:04 PM
Personally, I found Julianne kost's free tutorial videos online to be excellent. Starting knowing nothing, and while I am far from being a pro, I can do a decent job of getting a photo where I want it. I found her to be very very clear and not at all boring. . She has lots and lots of videos. Jkost.com
Is there anything similar in photography lessons for free?

SF opened my eyes to the world of photography and I'm craving some more in depth lessons :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on May 15, 2014, 10:21:18 PM
Is there anything similar in photography lessons for free?

SF opened my eyes to the world of photography and I'm craving some more in depth lessons :)
SF told me about this website. Very comprehensive... http://www.cambridgeincolour.com/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 15, 2014, 10:30:13 PM
Is there anything similar in photography lessons for free?

Scott Kelby's got a training empire (he's the top-selling technology author in the world or something like that).

Check out http://kelbytv.com/ - there are thousands of videos on everything from beginner to pro. For beginners I'd suggest the Photography Tips and Tricks videos, preferably starting with the oldest and working back. There's a wealth of good stuff there, and it's quite entertaining too.

He also has a pay site (http://kelbyone.com/) where the top pros in the world give classes on anything photography-related you could imagine. It's not cheap, but it's absolutely amazing.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 15, 2014, 10:42:06 PM
He also has a pay site (http://kelbyone.com/) where the top pros in the world give classes on anything photography-related you could imagine. It's not cheap, but it's absolutely amazing.

BTW - anyone interested in splitting a yearly subscription? I haven't had any issues with multiple people accessing one account, even at the same time. I could also get it at a very substantial discount.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on May 15, 2014, 10:45:13 PM
I'd LOVE to, but unfortunately I don't get to spend nearly as much time on photography as I wish I could, and with a tight budget, I can't justify the spend knowing that I'll barely end up using it - if at all.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on May 15, 2014, 11:57:49 PM
BTW - anyone interested in splitting a yearly subscription? I haven't had any issues with multiple people accessing one account, even at the same time. I could also get it at a very substantial discount.
wow! If the classes are anything like that website, then it must be very professional! I'd be in if you can let us know the monthly fees. Thnks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on May 16, 2014, 03:36:00 AM
BTW - anyone interested in splitting a yearly subscription? I haven't had any issues with multiple people accessing one account, even at the same time. I could also get it at a very substantial discount.

Details?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 16, 2014, 09:38:19 AM
BTW - anyone interested in splitting a yearly subscription? I haven't had any issues with multiple people accessing one account, even at the same time. I could also get it at a very substantial discount.
I'd probably be interested
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 16, 2014, 09:41:28 AM
I could get it for $188+tax. With four people it'll come out to $4-5 a month, obviously less if more people join.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on May 16, 2014, 10:28:12 AM
I could get it for $188+tax. With four people it'll come out to $4-5 a month, obviously less if more people join.

I'm in.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 16, 2014, 10:51:58 AM
Me too pls
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 16, 2014, 01:14:53 PM
I'm in
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on May 16, 2014, 01:20:56 PM
For beginners too? If so, I'm in.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on May 16, 2014, 01:34:45 PM
For beginners too? If so, I'm in.
Based on your photos at the DO you don't sound like a beginner anymore :-X
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 16, 2014, 01:35:32 PM
OK - we have 6 people, let's cap it at that. I'll PM you the login info later.

SF
CS1
Chaim'l
Rots5
whYME
DTB

It'll be around $35 p/p for the year.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on May 17, 2014, 11:43:12 PM
Sent payment via PayPal. Added additional amt to help you offset the pp charges. Thanks again for this service.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 18, 2014, 01:51:49 AM
Will send. Sorry for the delay.

Also. Is this a good tripod (http://c2.dealnews.com/4f3ed16d62047742c91abb571l2sw.gp4/U3exuMPoJm6sKLbtAa718)? 30$
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lubaby on May 18, 2014, 10:24:51 AM
Sent payment via PayPal. Added additional amt to help you offset the pp charges. Thanks again for this service.
Next time just mark it as Family/Friends and there won't be any charges (unless you're paying via CC).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ari9 on May 18, 2014, 09:18:22 PM
BTW - anyone interested in splitting a yearly subscription? I haven't had any issues with multiple people accessing one account, even at the same time. I could also get it at a very substantial discount.
just saw this  :( any way to still join?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: CS1 on May 18, 2014, 09:40:19 PM
just saw this  :( any way to still join?
Sure -- pick someone nice (such as SF), pay half of their bill, share the pw, and you're all set.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on May 19, 2014, 01:09:06 AM
Is this (http://m.costco.com/.product.11746472.html?cm_sp=RichRelevance-_-itempageVerticalRight-_-CategorySiloedViewCP&cm_vc=itempageVerticalRight|CategorySiloedViewCP) the best I could get , in this price range, with a ball-head?
Will send. Sorry for the delay.

Also. Is this a good tripod (http://c2.dealnews.com/4f3ed16d62047742c91abb571l2sw.gp4/U3exuMPoJm6sKLbtAa718)? 30$
BUMP
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 19, 2014, 07:52:09 AM
and this flash http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001ZT3DOU/ref=gb1h_img_c-2_1842_cc214f5b?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_t=701&pf_rd_s=center-new-2&pf_rd_r=1ARAPRY19SMB654ADVCJ&pf_rd_i=20&pf_rd_p=1725241842 

its going to be an amazon gold box deal later today. is it any worth it?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 19, 2014, 05:32:04 PM
Will send. Sorry for the delay.

Also. Is this a good tripod (http://c2.dealnews.com/4f3ed16d62047742c91abb571l2sw.gp4/U3exuMPoJm6sKLbtAa718)? 30$

Pretty good deal. It doesn't hold much weight though - make sure that what you plan on putting on is not more than half of what the head is rated for.

and this flash http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001ZT3DOU/ref=gb1h_img_c-2_1842_cc214f5b?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_t=701&pf_rd_s=center-new-2&pf_rd_r=1ARAPRY19SMB654ADVCJ&pf_rd_i=20&pf_rd_p=1725241842 

its going to be an amazon gold box deal later today. is it any worth it?

Chazerei.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on May 19, 2014, 05:34:38 PM
thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on May 19, 2014, 08:04:50 PM
How did they get AMEX to freeze the price for the platinum card? Mine goes up every year!
I usually get offers of 2,000-5,000 Starpoints for keeping the Starwood AMEX once the annual fee hits.
Post here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on May 19, 2014, 08:06:02 PM
Post here (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0).

Already did, sorry was a mistake.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: how on May 23, 2014, 06:21:52 AM
Using a simple point and shoot power shot Elph the indoor children pictures in halogen light come out yellow. The best way to fix that is to play with the ISO?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 23, 2014, 07:13:23 AM
Using a simple point and shoot power shot Elph the indoor children pictures in halogen light come out yellow. The best way to fix that is to play with the ISO?

White balance is what you have to change.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: how on May 23, 2014, 09:07:26 AM
thanks ill play with it
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on June 02, 2014, 10:43:29 AM
Dolica AX620B100 62-Inch Proline Tripod and Ball Head ($45)

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001D60LG8/?tag=cl03f-20

vs

Dolica 60" Lightweight Tripod with Ball Head ($25 - Sale)

http://www.adorama.com/DOST600B001.html

Or any other recommendations... TIA
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on June 11, 2014, 10:53:50 PM
FREE Photography Classes at Sony Store (this Weekend). (http://FREE Photography Classes at Select Sony Stores (this Weekend).)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A European on June 12, 2014, 07:26:59 AM
I overcharged my Nex 6(I left it over shabbes connected to a PC), and now it doesn't go on!
Is there any thing I could do?
(It's like that for a couple of days)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 12, 2014, 07:31:23 AM
I overcharged my Nex 6(I left it over shabbes connected to a PC), and now it doesn't go on!
Is there any thing I could do?
(It's like that for a couple of days)

Weird. Overcharging is hardly an issue nowadays, at worst cutting down the battery life by a miniscule amount. Sounds like it may have been a power surge or something instead.

In any case, you have to eliminate the variables. Try using a different battery and see if that works. If it does, great, and buy an external charger for the future. If the new battery doesn't work either, you'll probably have to deal with the warranty.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on June 12, 2014, 09:56:45 AM

If the new battery doesn't work either, you'll probably have to deal with the warranty.

(Unless you bought it from amazon (FBA) within the last 30 days in which case you should be able to just return it).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on June 12, 2014, 11:51:38 AM
FREE Photography Classes at Sony Store (this Weekend). (http://FREE Photography Classes at Select Sony Stores (this Weekend).)

Maybe it's just me, but link doesn't work.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on June 12, 2014, 11:53:07 AM
Maybe it's just me, but link doesn't work.

Yup same here and here is why...

url=http://FREE Photography Classes at Select Sony Stores (this Weekend).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DovtheBear on June 12, 2014, 12:01:37 PM
Oops (http://blog.sony.com/2014/01/creative-academy/)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on June 12, 2014, 12:28:59 PM
Sometimes, when I shoot on sunny afternoons, I get this violet halo framing part of the subject, and it's hell to remove it in photoshop. Anybody know why this happens or how to avoid it? Shooting with Canon 40d.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 12, 2014, 01:25:19 PM
Sometimes, when I shoot on sunny afternoons, I get this violet halo framing part of the subject, and it's hell to remove it in photoshop. Anybody know why this happens or how to avoid it? Shooting with Canon 40d.

Could you post an example and your settings?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on June 13, 2014, 09:08:43 AM
Canon has the refurbished 50mm 1.8 II for $70.55 + $5 for shipping..... Plus you get a 1 year Canon warranty! I love this lens!! A must have....

Canon Link (http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/lenses-flashes/refurbished-lenses/ef-50mm-f-18-ii-refurbished?WT.mc_id=C126149)

ETA: Link (TY)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lubaby on June 13, 2014, 09:16:42 AM
Canon has the refurbished 50mm 1.8 II for $70.55 + $5 for shipping..... Plus you get a 1 year Canon warranty! I love this lens!! A must have....
Posting the link (http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/lenses-flashes/refurbished-lenses/ef-50mm-f-18-ii-refurbished) always helps :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A European on June 18, 2014, 05:40:52 PM
Weird. Overcharging is hardly an issue nowadays, at worst cutting down the battery life by a miniscule amount. Sounds like it may have been a power surge or something instead.

In any case, you have to eliminate the variables. Try using a different battery and see if that works. If it does, great, and buy an external charger for the future. If the new battery doesn't work either, you'll probably have to deal with the warranty.
SF Thanks!

You were right I bought 2 external batteries with a charger ( http://www.amazon.de/gp/aw/d/B00HEXTEOE ) and not it works!

Thanks!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A European on June 19, 2014, 05:39:37 AM
SF Thanks!

You were right I bought 2 external batteries with a charger ( http://www.amazon.de/gp/aw/d/B00HEXTEOE ) and now it works!

Thanks!!
Just fixed my mistake.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ushdadude on June 30, 2014, 10:11:50 PM
I'm driving the PCH with my new gopro 3 next week. what accessories and general tips and tricks do you have for me? thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 30, 2014, 10:32:56 PM
I'm driving the PCH with my new gopro 3 next week. what accessories and general tips and tricks do you have for me? thanks

Definitely get the suction mount, that's best for shooting out of a car. Also get the frame, that'll askew your to shoot while connected to power (which you'll probably have to do).

Also remember that the widest view is not always best while driving, experiment with all the different ones.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ushdadude on June 30, 2014, 10:35:43 PM
Definitely get the suction mount, that's best for shooting out of a car. Also get the frame, that'll askew your to shoot while connected to power (which you'll probably have to do).

Also remember that the widest view is not always best while driving, experiment with all the different ones.

thanks! can i use the frame while the camera is outside the car?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 30, 2014, 10:47:36 PM
thanks! can i use the frame while the camera is outside the car?

No. For that use the included underwater housing.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ilherman on July 13, 2014, 11:15:04 PM
Where is the cheapest place to buy Adobe Photoshop CS6?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ushdadude on July 13, 2014, 11:19:35 PM
How do I truly capture the height of a California red wood?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2014, 09:33:16 PM
How do I truly capture the height of a California red wood?

Like so 8):



But for the rest of us, we can use an extremely wide lens points upwards. The problem with that is that you won't see the real scale, plus it'll look like every picture ever taken.

A better option would be to not even try to capture the whole thing. The trick is to show a bit of the tree and suggesting the immensity of it, by using scale. A person standing next to the trunk looking up, a car parked next to it. Even if you only show a bit of height and most (if not all) of the width, the viewer will instantly know that the tree is absolutely tremendous. A picture like this could be far more powerful that attempting to show the entire height.

I'll see later if I could find some shots to illustrate my point better.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2014, 09:45:47 PM
Here's the "looking up" shot. Cool? Sure. Does it really show how big the trees are? Not quite.

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4053/4454135937_4498ebd166_z.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23737778@N00/4454135937/)
Vertical Redwoods in Corner Light (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23737778@N00/4454135937/) by JamesWatkins (https://www.flickr.com/people/23737778@N00/), on Flickr

These  use scale to suggest the size. I think these are much more powerful pictures:

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/111/302447598_42f740dc83_z.jpg?zz=1) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikejonesphoto/302447598/)
Sequoia W37 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/mikejonesphoto/302447598/) by MikeJonesPhoto (https://www.flickr.com/people/mikejonesphoto/), on Flickr

Link (https://www.flickr.com/photos/asierlh/3884613434/) to the other one (the owner disabled embedding).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Joe4007 on July 22, 2014, 08:36:20 PM
Really enjoyed your lessons so far. Eagerly awaiting the next one!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 22, 2014, 10:17:33 PM
Here's the "looking up" shot. Cool? Sure. Does it really show how big the trees are? Not quite.

(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4053/4454135937_4498ebd166_z.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23737778@N00/4454135937/)
Vertical Redwoods in Corner Light (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23737778@N00/4454135937/) by JamesWatkins (https://www.flickr.com/people/23737778@N00/), on Flickr


I asked about something like this earlier, but wasn't able to upload any photo due to privacy issues- but what makes that purplish glow around the leaves on the top? And how can it be avoided? I notice it usually happens when the subject is against a white or overexposed sky.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 22, 2014, 10:35:07 PM
I asked about something like this earlier, but wasn't able to upload any photo due to privacy issues- but what makes that purplish glow around the leaves on the top? And how can it be avoided? I notice it usually happens when the subject is against a white or overexposed sky.

It's called chromatic aberration and color fringing. Chromatic aberration generally happens along the corners of the image, while color fringing usually happens (as you said) on fine detail against a bright background, most commonly leaves.

One of the main reasons top lenses cost what they do is because they use extremely expensive glass and coatings, specifically to eliminate CA and fringing. Barring a top of the line lens, this could be (mostly) corrected in software. In fact, many cameras have this software built in and apply the corrections after every shot automatically. All Nikons do this, and I assume Canons and Sonys too.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 22, 2014, 10:40:49 PM
It's called chromatic aberration and color fringing. Chromatic aberration generally happens along the corners of the image, while color fringing usually happens (as you said) on fine detail against a bright background, most commonly leaves.

One of the main reasons top lenses cost what they do is because they use extremely expensive glass and coatings, specifically to eliminate CA and fringing. Barring a top of the line lens, this could be (mostly) corrected in software. In fact, many cameras have this software built in and apply the corrections after every shot automatically. All Nikons do this, and I assume Canons and Sonys too.

I find this mostly happening on skin- all the way along an arm, or curving along the silhouette of a face. I shoot with a Canon- any reason it isn't automatically corrected?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 22, 2014, 10:44:23 PM
(https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4053/4454135937_4498ebd166_z.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23737778@N00/4454135937/)
Vertical Redwoods in Corner Light (https://www.flickr.com/photos/23737778@N00/4454135937/) by JamesWatkins (https://www.flickr.com/people/23737778@N00/), on Flickr

I'm noticing now that the color fringing may be due to the fact the this image was artificially warmed up by painting or masking or the like. You can see the original cooler tones in the bottom left corner of the photo...

Does excessive lighting and tone changes exacerbate any color fringing in a photo? Meaning it would barely have been noticeable in the original yet becomes much more obvious with the edit.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 22, 2014, 10:48:06 PM
I find this mostly happening on skin- all the way along an arm, or curving along the silhouette of a face. I shoot with a Canon- any reason it isn't automatically corrected?

Which Canon?

I'm noticing now that the color fringing may be due to the fact the this image was artificially warmed up by painting or masking or the like. You can see the original cooler tones in the bottom left corner of the photo...

Does excessive lighting and tone changes exacerbate any color fringing in a photo? Meaning it would barely have been noticeable in the original yet becomes much more obvious with the edit.

Absolutely. Radical highlight recovery for example will generally exacerbate existing fringing, or bring out some that were not visible earlier.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on July 25, 2014, 02:06:43 PM
Hi, any tips for shooting at a large rally of people?

I don't mean like to focus on, rather was setting or equipment should I keep the camera on?

I will be shooting with http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/634600-REG/Pentax_21870_SMC_Pentax_DA_50_200mm.html lens.

I can also use the kit 18-55 which I may for a bit, but I figure I will prob get some better closer shots with this one..
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 28, 2014, 01:45:47 PM
Hi, any tips for shooting at a large rally of people?

I don't mean like to focus on, rather was setting or equipment should I keep the camera on?

I will be shooting with http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/634600-REG/Pentax_21870_SMC_Pentax_DA_50_200mm.html lens.

I can also use the kit 18-55 which I may for a bit, but I figure I will prob get some better closer shots with this one..

Well, obviously the camera settings will depend on what you're planning to focus on. Why don't you google images of rallies or large crowds and see which ones you go for? Once you know what kind of look you're going for- you can figure out what the necessary settings are for those photos.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: joey123 on July 28, 2014, 02:34:36 PM
Can anyone on DDF recommend a book about using a DSLR camera? It would be much appreciated. Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on July 28, 2014, 02:44:19 PM
Personally, I found Bryan petersons "understanding exposure" to be a very good starting point. Teaches the fundamentals of exposure - which essentially means "photo making" - in a very easy readable way that left me feeling like I hadn't learned anything, just that I now understood how photo taking works.
On course there is much more to the art of photography than just exposure, but that exposure of the sensory is the capturing of the photo and that's at the center of everything.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on July 28, 2014, 03:36:21 PM
Personally, I found Bryan petersons "understanding exposure" to be a very good starting point. Teaches the fundamentals of exposure - which essentially means "photo making" - in a very easy readable way that left me feeling like I hadn't learned anything, just that I now understood how photo taking works.
On course there is much more to the art of photography than just exposure, but that exposure of the sensory is the capturing of the photo and that's at the center of everything.
Most of his books I really liked, my favorite being the one you mentioned. His composition field guide book was pretty weird IMHO.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on July 28, 2014, 08:47:06 PM
Bryan Peterson's understanding exposure is great! Very happy I bought it...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 28, 2014, 09:18:39 PM
Pretty much everything you need to know about exposure is here:

http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg652629#msg652629

A book won't tell you much else.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on July 29, 2014, 09:02:17 PM
Pretty much everything you need to know about exposure is here:

http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg652629#msg652629

A book won't tell you much else.
-0.5
SF certainly can get you off to a great start with his fantastic lessons. Nonetheless, I find "Understanding Exposure" (check out it's amazon rankings in class here http://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/books/10825721/ref=sr_bs_1) to be well worth the read. It breaks down the nature of exposure (and a nice amount of composition) down nicely and his side-by-side comparison photos are really great.
 I mean this in no way to put down SF's lessons or expertise. I am very much an amateur and his lessons have been fantastic! SF, your breakdown of subject and presentation is amazing! I hope you put up some more lessons soon!

Can't get too much of great thing I suppose :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 29, 2014, 09:50:44 PM
-0.5
SF certainly can get you off to a great start with his fantastic lessons. Nonetheless, I find "Understanding Exposure" (check out it's amazon rankings in class here http://www.amazon.com/gp/bestsellers/books/10825721/ref=sr_bs_1) to be well worth the read. It breaks the nature of exposure (and a nice amount of composition) down nicely and his side-by-side comparison photos are really great.
 I mean this in no way to put down SF's lessons or expertise. I am very much an amateur and his lessons have been fantastic! SF, your breakdown of subject and presentation is amazing! I hope you put up some more lessons soon!

Can't get too much of great thing I suppose :)

I disagree. Exposure is a simple formula. Once you know it- you can't know it better. Composition, on the other hand is a completely different thing- you can never learn all there is to composition.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 29, 2014, 10:06:33 PM
You're both right.

Exposure in and of itself is extremely simple once you memorize a few simple numbers. However (as I believe I've mentioned before), there's a big difference between the correct exposure and the right exposure. Everything you need to make a correct exposure could be learned from what I've already talked about.

The right exposure, on the other hand, is a completely different bird. You as a photographer choose what mood you want to convey in your picture and what you want the viewer to focus on. All this comes down to vision, planning, and skill. I will be talking about these topics in future lessons (they're coming, I promise ;)!), but a book discussing only exposure will expound on this in far greater detail than I could here on the forums.

These books generally aren't for beginners as they are often very intense, but once you're comfortable in your photography I highly recommend them. I own plenty books like that and have read many more.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on July 29, 2014, 10:09:49 PM
(they're coming, I promise ;)!),
I don't want to pressure you, you are after all doing us a favor, just letting you know that we're waiting here... :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on July 29, 2014, 10:14:22 PM
I don't want to pressure you, you are after all doing us a favor, just letting you know that we're waiting here... :)
+1
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ez on July 29, 2014, 11:18:58 PM
I don't want to pressure you, you are after all doing us a favor, just letting you know that we're waiting here... :)

+1000

Every time i see this thread in my "Unread" list, I'm getting all excited again...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: theberk on July 31, 2014, 06:29:40 PM
+1000

Every time i see this thread in my "Unread" list, I'm getting all excited again...
Me too
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 01, 2014, 02:52:59 AM
1. What did I do wrong here?
Why is the picture so grainy? (is that the right word for it?)
Is it something with the exposure? (Or could it be something as stupid as it just being out of focus?)

2. Thoughts / comments on the two crops?

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2913/14613008959_27d544ac28_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/21774049@N05/14613008959)


(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3859/14613372887_018838486c_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/photos/21774049@N05/14613372887)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on August 01, 2014, 08:30:15 AM
grain could be due to a high iso
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 01, 2014, 03:28:19 PM
grain could be due to a high iso

Exactly. See the difference after applying some basic noise-removal settings in Lightroom (settings on the right):

(http://i.imgur.com/jTS1TUM.png)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on August 01, 2014, 06:14:00 PM
Feedback anyone?!?!?

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3859/14618332458_fcb9009b3d_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/ogLLWN)

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5582/14804618112_4167c769eb_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/oyexbq)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: MC on August 01, 2014, 06:47:03 PM
I really like the perspective in the second one!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on August 02, 2014, 04:31:45 PM
its a picture of an aeroplane
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 03, 2014, 03:19:28 AM
grain could be due to a high iso
Exactly.
Thanks.

Any idea what my ISO should've been here?
Or for that matter how high I can go with a t3i without having to worry about noise? (Google has not been my friend on this so far...)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 03, 2014, 11:33:57 AM
Thanks.

Any idea what my ISO should've been here?
Or for that matter how high I can go with a t3i without having to worry about noise? (Google has not been my friend on this so far...)

You should always be on the lowest ISO possible... Your picture was taken at ISO 1600 and f/13. In reality you could have shot it at 2.8, since evening in your shot is at infinity so it would all still be in focus. Had you done that, you could have dropped your ISO by a corresponding 4.5 stops to below 100.

You could have also used a longer shutter speed, but you would have lost the fine detail in some clouds due to movement.

As far as the highest ISO, the reason you can't find an answer online is because there isn't one. It depends on your own noise tolerance. You have to shoot and test at all different ISO levels and decide for yourself where you want to draw the line. Also remember that a grainy picture is always better than no picture, so don't hesitate to raise the ISO into the stratosphere if needed.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 03, 2014, 04:19:28 PM
Your picture was taken at ISO 1600 and f/13. In reality you could have shot it at 2.8, since evening in your shot is at infinity so it would all still be in focus.
I had a feeling it would be something that would make me feel stupid :)

As far as the highest ISO, the reason you can't find an answer online is because there isn't one. It depends on your own noise tolerance. You have to shoot and test at all different ISO levels and decide for yourself where you want to draw the line. Also remember that a grainy picture is always better than no picture, so don't hesitate to raise the ISO into the stratosphere if needed.
I hear you.
I guess I assumed based on this:
...a modern full-frame camera could go to ISO 3200 and stay clean.
that there's more of a definitive answer...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on August 03, 2014, 04:48:19 PM
You should always be on the lowest ISO possible... Your picture was taken at ISO 1600 and f/13. In reality you could have shot it at 2.8, since evening in your shot is at infinity so it would all still be in focus. Had you done that, you could have dropped your ISO by a corresponding 4.5 stops to below 100.

You could have also used a longer shutter speed, but you would have lost the fine detail in some clouds due to movement.

As far as the highest ISO, the reason you can't find an answer online is because there isn't one. It depends on your own noise tolerance. You have to shoot and test at all different ISO levels and decide for yourself where you want to draw the line. Also remember that a grainy picture is always better than no picture, so don't hesitate to raise the ISO into the stratosphere if needed.



Something interesting to add to this, from a very technical perspective (note, not for the faint of technical jargon heart). SF, I hope you don't mind if I chime in here as this is a topic I've actually taught in a workshop before, and I personally find it fascinating.

ISO values on your digital camera are more-or-less fake. Back in the days of shooting on actual 35mm film, stock was rated with an ASA number that corresponded to the light sensitivity of it. ASA 400, for example, exposed brighter looking images than ASA 100, but at the cost of slightly more grain and noise in the image. If shooting outdoors, a photographer would choose ASA 100, because there was plenty of light and it would yield the most noise-free crisp images versus the higher speed ones, even though the higher speed ones could technically be used both outdoors AND indoors (and would therefore seem a more worthwhile film to load if not for the degraded image quality as a result).
So properly exposing an image is a balance of the aperture, shutter speed and film speed, as I'm sure SF has mentioned before. Later on, due to a lack of international standards (in other countries, film speed was called DIN and had different numbers, which totally confused everyone), they made an international standard of light sensitivity numbers called ISO. Now, no matter where in the world you are buying film, your exposure math will be consistant (f/stop, shutter, ISO). When cameras went digital, there was no such thing as "film speed" anymore. There is no film. Things had the potential to get confusing again.

A digital sensor has a certain natural sensitivity to light. This can be turned up or down using a combination of analog or digital gain values, much like the volume adjustment of an audio player. You can turn the volume down lower than the natural level, and it will be very quiet, or you can boost it up high and get a lot of background noise amplified with it. Some video cameras let you adjust this value in dB increments. But for photography, we need to adhere to the ISO number standards for consistency, so they calculate how much gain it would take to emulate a particular ISO film speed, and build that into the software of the camera. Now, you have NO IDEA what the gain of the camera actually is, all you know is what ISO equivalent you are set to.

Some cameras with larger photosites have a lot of light sensitivity. Let's say, a 5D's native sensitivity would be around the equivalent of ISO 800 (making up numbers, but I wouldn't be surprised). When you set the camera to ISO 100, you are just turning down the natural gain from the sensor. You will get noise as you go higher than that (ISO 3200, etc) but lower than that your image will be relatively clean. That is, ISO 100, 200, 320, 400, etc, should be all be more-or-less identical! (they're not necessarily, but I'll get to why later) But now let's take a sensor with smaller photosites, like a Nikon N1, which let's say has a native sensitivity equivalent of ISO 200. That means even at a setting of 400, you'll get some noise. At ISO 1250, it will be even worse than the 5D would be because it is applying even MORE gain to reach that equivalent amount of sensitivity.

Now, here's where it gets even MORE interesting. If you know your cameras actual native ISO, You can work around that as your base number. In many situations, you won't really be getting a cleaner image by going lower than that, because the negative gain is fake and being applied after your sensor has acquired the information for the photo. In some cases (especially in video), the negative gain can actually lose some of the fine detail in the image!

On the Canon Rebel T2i, I remember experimenting with intermediate ISOs by using Magic Lantern to manually dial in ISO numbers that weren't accessible from the menu. I was surprised to find that ISO 640, for example, had less digital noise than ISO 400. Doing some research online showed that this was believed to be a more native value for the sensor! What was happening, is that a negative gain would be applied to bring it down to 320, which was an easy multiple off the native 640 (or something like that), than a digital gain applied to bring it up to an even 400. The result was noisier than being at a higher 640.

In a nutshell, SF's recommendation to keep the ISO as low as possible is a simple way to make sure your photos come out clean. But in the digital age, it may be somewhat of an oversimplification. Sometimes, in some rare situations, a perfect value that has very little gain (positive or negative applied) will give better results than a lower one!
:)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on August 03, 2014, 04:54:55 PM
I realize that this "explanation" may have a negative effect in which it confuses more people than it helps. But if any of you are feeling science-y, I hope I made it clear!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on August 03, 2014, 05:27:10 PM
Very cool!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on August 03, 2014, 05:43:00 PM
Also, yet another reason I hate "equivalency" terms in photography. Like when you buy a lens for a crop camera and it says "35mm equivalent" field of view values. Please. What if you aren't coming from 35mm photography? What if you shot medium or large format? Or if you (like me) come from the cinema world, where "full frame" s35 film is APS-C sized.

I wish we could just refer to everything as what it is. I know what a 50mm looks like on my crop sensor. Knowing what ISO 400 "equivalence" is on my camera is useful, but I really wish they'd also tell me what kind of gain I'm applying to get there. At least it should be an option in the camera!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: mek on August 05, 2014, 11:46:15 PM
https://www.yahoo.com/travel/watch-time-lapse-video-showcases-california-night-93817089552.html

Just wow
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 10, 2014, 08:34:25 AM
Bought a vello wireless receiver and it says to attach the receiver to the hot shoe or an accessory shoe if it's in use.  Googling reveals that an accessory shoe is a place to mount accessories when flash is in use.  Not quite sure what the accessory shoe would mount to or how? Any suggestions for one to get and better explanation for what it is?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 10, 2014, 08:57:40 AM
Bought a vello wireless receiver and it says to attach the receiver to the hot shoe or an accessory shoe if it's in use.  Googling reveals that an accessory shoe is a place to mount accessories when flash is in use.  Not quite sure what the accessory shoe would mount to or how? Any suggestions for one to get and better explanation for what it is?

It means a little female shoe-like accessory that goes into your camera strap. Holds shoe-mount accessories what the real shoe is in use.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 10, 2014, 02:03:32 PM
It means a little female shoe-like accessory that goes into your camera strap. Holds shoe-mount accessories what the real shoe is in use.
Would this (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/743059-REG/Vello_CS_WN_Universal_Accessory_Shoe_Mount.html/prm/alsVwDtl) or this (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/743061-REG/Vello_CS_Universal_Accessory_Shoe_Mount.html) mount to a strap?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: freddy on August 15, 2014, 04:42:43 PM
what's thdifferance beetween PowerShot A2400 IS  and powershot a400
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: lubaby on August 15, 2014, 04:49:07 PM
what's thdifferance beetween PowerShot A2400 IS  and powershot a400
Is that a serious question?
A400 looks like it's 10 years old, it only has 3.2MP and 2.2x optical zoom.
A2400 is a solid P&S camera, featuring 16MP and 5x optic zoom. Plus the hardware looks much nicer and it comes packed with tons of nice features.

ETA put it this way, Amazon trade-in values the A400 at $.50, while the A2400 is worth $52.20 (more than x10 the amount).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: freddy on August 15, 2014, 04:51:49 PM
Is that a serious question?
A400 looks like it's 10 years old, it only has 3.2MP and 2.2x optical zoom.
A2400 is a solid P&S camera, featuring 16MP and 5x optic zoom. Plus the hardware looks much nicer and it comes packed with tons of nice features.
Thanks I'm trying to sell a A2400 refurbed and tring to figure out value. Thought it might be same as A400...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: EJB on August 21, 2014, 11:57:18 PM
Paging SF: Is this (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=1001008&gclid=CLCF8pbepMACFSdk7AodrCkAJA&is=REG&A=details&Q=) a good deal for my nex-6?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 22, 2014, 12:10:59 AM
Paging SF: Is this (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=1001008&gclid=CLCF8pbepMACFSdk7AodrCkAJA&is=REG&A=details&Q=) a good deal for my nex-6?

It's a better deal than usual, but it's still a fair amount of money for a lens like this.

Did you consider used?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: EJB on August 22, 2014, 12:37:05 AM
It's a better deal than usual, but it's still a fair amount of money for a lens like this.

Did you consider used?

Where's a good place to buy it used (besides amazon, which doesn't have it much cheaper)?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 22, 2014, 12:40:37 AM
Where's a good place to buy it used (besides amazon, which doesn't have it much cheaper)?

Ebay, B&H, Adorama...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on August 25, 2014, 12:07:17 PM
@SF. How do I blur out faces in LR?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 25, 2014, 12:08:19 PM
@SF. How do I blur out faces in LR?

As in depth of field, or privacy?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Joe4007 on August 25, 2014, 12:08:48 PM
@SF. How do I blur out faces in LR?
Someone is getting us a TR  :D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on August 25, 2014, 12:14:57 PM
As in depth of field, or privacy?
Privacy, as in your Alaska TR.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on August 25, 2014, 12:15:15 PM
Someone is getting us a TR  :D
Yup. Hope to have part 1 up today.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 25, 2014, 01:40:07 PM
Privacy, as in your Alaska TR.

LR is extremely limited in that respect. You could use the brush and knock the clarity and sharpness down all the way, but that will make it more hazy than blurry, and not at all pixelated. You could also try the radial blur tool, but again, you won't get much privacy that way.

What I do for my TR is use Photoshop. Open image, duplicate layer, apply mosaic, then use a layer mask to paint in the areas I want pixelated. The level of mosaic depends on the subject matter and image size; five minutes of experimentation is enough to get the hang of what works for what.

I've also made an action which does this all automatically except the painting, so it takes me just a couple of seconds each picture.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on August 26, 2014, 05:35:47 PM
LR is extremely limited in that respect. You could use the brush and knock the clarity and sharpness down all the way, but that will make it more hazy than blurry, and not at all pixelated. You could also try the radial blur tool, but again, you won't get much privacy that way.

What I do for my TR is use Photoshop. Open image, duplicate layer, apply mosaic, then use a layer mask to paint in the areas I want pixelated. The level of mosaic depends on the subject matter and image size; five minutes of experimentation is enough to get the hang of what works for what.

I've also made an action which does this all automatically except the painting, so it takes me just a couple of seconds each picture.
Thanks. It works well.
I used imgur for my images and it looks like it's degrading the quality. What hosting service can I use that doesn't degrade IQ while keeping the images a reasonable size?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 26, 2014, 05:36:52 PM
I use Flickr.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Here to learn on August 31, 2014, 12:14:28 AM
I use Flickr.

Is this a good deal:
New Canon EOS Rebel SL1 18 MP Digital SLR Camera 18-55mm + Extra 75-300MM Lens
$549.99
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on August 31, 2014, 12:16:47 AM

Is this a good deal:
New Canon EOS Rebel SL1 18 MP Digital SLR Camera 18-55mm + Extra 75-300MM Lens
$549.99

Link?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on August 31, 2014, 12:16:52 AM
Is this a good deal:
New Canon EOS Rebel SL1 18 MP Digital SLR Camera 18-55mm + Extra 75-300MM Lens
$549.99
http://www.dansdeals.com/archives/50591 (http://www.dansdeals.com/archives/50591)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: zale on August 31, 2014, 11:51:46 AM
SF, one of my kids smudged the lens on my RX100 camera. What is the best way to clean it?

Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on August 31, 2014, 03:04:13 PM
SF, one of my kids smudged the lens on my RX100 camera. What is the best way to clean it?

Thanks
A lens cloth?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 31, 2014, 03:24:56 PM
A lens cloth?

Yup...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: zale on August 31, 2014, 03:29:44 PM
Yup...

Doesn't the cloth just "move" the smudge around?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 31, 2014, 04:01:51 PM
Doesn't the cloth just "move" the smudge around?

Nope. If it's very oily you could try a lenspen, but a cloth will be enough 99% of the time.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on August 31, 2014, 04:11:15 PM
Nope. If it's very oily you could try a lenspen, but a cloth will be enough 99% of the time.
Lenspen may just fit the RX, but he won't be able to wipe with it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 31, 2014, 04:14:32 PM
Lenspen may just fit the RX, but he won't be able to wipe with it.

They make smaller versions.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on August 31, 2014, 08:36:21 PM
This is my first attempt at blurring the background and following a moving person / object.
Sorry I took a screen shot off a diff page. (Posting from ipad now) the full size one with the details are on my computer....
Thoughts?


(http://img.tapatalk.com/d/14/09/01/uma4ypub.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on September 02, 2014, 02:11:28 PM
Really hard to tell- quality looks like it was taken from a freeze-frame on a youtube video. In other words, heavily compressed, likely because of where you had to get it to post here.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on September 02, 2014, 04:17:40 PM
Yes I know. Silly to even post it... Will.upload it to Flickr later and try from there..
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on September 04, 2014, 11:25:28 PM
Got the new camera.. Now to only learn how to use it.. But for now, two pictures from tonights activities.

Still kind of mixed over this one. Anyone care to guess the airline?

(http://i57.tinypic.com/x25s02.jpg)

(http://i62.tinypic.com/14y3f55.jpg)

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on September 06, 2014, 08:45:43 PM
Um... Cathay Pacific Cargo....
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: theberk on September 06, 2014, 09:18:14 PM
Um... Cathay Pacific Cargo....
I think the question was for the first picture.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on September 06, 2014, 09:19:56 PM
Um... Cathay Pacific Cargo....

Lol.. taking the easy way out I see.. Still amazes me standing 5 feet away from the plane.

I think the question was for the first picture.

It was indeed
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: TimT on September 06, 2014, 09:20:30 PM
UFO ?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on September 06, 2014, 10:21:01 PM
AA?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on September 06, 2014, 10:34:25 PM
AA?

You see.. That wasn't too hard..
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on September 07, 2014, 02:05:12 AM
but why in the learn photography thread?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on September 12, 2014, 01:49:23 PM
In general what's better for taking pictures, a cloudy day or somewhat sunny?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 12, 2014, 01:51:20 PM
looking to buy a portrait lens for nikon (1.2/2.8 )
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 12, 2014, 01:54:14 PM
looking to buy a portrait lens for nikon (1.2/2.8)

Yay!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 12, 2014, 01:55:48 PM
In general what's better for taking pictures, a cloudy day or somewhat sunny?

If you want pictures of clouds I'd suggest a cloudy day. If you want to shoot the sun wait till it's somewhat sunny.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 12, 2014, 01:56:53 PM
Yay!
meant 2.8

anyone have a used one to sell. or know where i can buy a cheap one.

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 12, 2014, 01:57:10 PM
Sorry, I'm in a snarky mood today ;).

What's with the over-generalized, open ended questions today?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 12, 2014, 01:59:00 PM
meant 2.8

anyone have a used one to sell. or know where i can buy a cheap one.

You could check B&H and Adorama used dept., or even ebay (as long as the guy had a really good history).

Which camera is it for, and what focal length were you thinking of?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 12, 2014, 01:59:06 PM
Sorry, I'm in a snarky mood today ;).

What's with the over-generalized, open ended questions today?
boss didnt show, im bored...

i already set up my team for this week
orderd table, washer, dryer, and iphones...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on September 12, 2014, 01:59:24 PM
If you want pictures of clouds I'd suggest a cloudy day. If you want to shoot the sun wait till it's somewhat sunny.
Lol 8),

I wanna shoot my child...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 12, 2014, 01:59:47 PM
You could check B&H and Adorama used dept., or even ebay (as long as the guy had a really good history).

Which camera is it for, and what focal length were you thinking of?
nikon d3100 and i dont know. ur the camera pimp. :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on September 12, 2014, 02:00:35 PM
Lol 8),

I wanna shoot my child...
:o :-X
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 12, 2014, 02:12:25 PM
nikon d3100 and i dont know. ur the camera pimp. :)

The 85 1.8 is an amazing portrait lens, and relatively cheap. On your camera, you could even use a 50 1.8 and get great portraits.

Note that only the AF-S versions of these lenses all work properly on your camera; the D (older and cheaper) versions won't autofocus.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 12, 2014, 02:14:07 PM
Lol 8),

I wanna shoot my child...

For portraits slightly overcast generally works better - the light is soft and beautiful. On sunnier days shooting in open shade would be preferable to shooting out in the sun.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on September 12, 2014, 02:16:28 PM
For portraits slightly overcast generally works better - the light is soft and beautiful. On sunnier days shooting in open shade would be preferable to shooting out in the sun.
Here you/I go!
Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on September 12, 2014, 02:22:21 PM
:o :-X
SF motivated me to do it, blame him :D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 12, 2014, 02:52:53 PM
I wanna shoot my child...
you should meet yehuda s :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 12, 2014, 03:14:14 PM
The 85 1.8 is an amazing portrait lens, and relatively cheap. On your camera, you could even use a 50 1.8 and get great portraits.
Just bear in mind that you'll need a lot of space for the 85. IME even with my 50 I often find myself without enough space for the shot I want. (when shooting candids etc.)

I'd like to hear Fishy's opinion, but based on my limited experience, I think you should only get the 85 (probably 50 also) if you plan on pretty much using it for posed(?) portraits where you're setting it up in an environment where you have the space you need.
If it's in your budget, I think you'll get far more use out of a zoom f/2.8 as an "everyday" lens. Although you won't get as good portraits as with the fast prime.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 12, 2014, 03:27:13 PM
For portraits slightly overcast generally works better
Is there anything that sunny is better for?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on September 12, 2014, 03:30:32 PM
Is there anything that sunny is better for?


If you want to shoot the sun wait till it's somewhat sunny.
^-^
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 14, 2014, 12:27:01 AM
Some really cool shots here
http://www.brainjet.com/random/3531/15-most-creative-forced-perspective-pictures?til=d-df-3531#slide/0/0
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: TimT on September 14, 2014, 12:37:32 AM
Some really cool shots here
http://www.brainjet.com/random/3531/15-most-creative-forced-perspective-pictures?til=d-df-3531#slide/0/0
Like
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on September 14, 2014, 09:02:16 AM
Ok so to shadow Rots5.... 50mm 1.8 http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/864663-REG/Pentax_smc_DA_50mm_f_1_8.html (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/864663-REG/Pentax_smc_DA_50mm_f_1_8.html)
or 35mm 2.4 http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/743117-USA/Pentax_21987_35mm_DA_L_F2_4.html (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/743117-USA/Pentax_21987_35mm_DA_L_F2_4.html)

or any other suggestions?


For portrait photography as well....
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on September 15, 2014, 12:44:10 PM
Some really cool shots here
http://www.brainjet.com/random/3531/15-most-creative-forced-perspective-pictures?til=d-df-3531#slide/0/0
a few are clearly photshopped, but many are great. I really loved the one with the girl and the mirror as well as the farting clouds. I'm such a 2 year old.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 15, 2014, 02:07:38 PM
Thanks so much for the time guys. I will look around. I usually dont set up but i like to have candid portraits where its just the person in the picture and the backround blurry.

Under 100$ pref
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 15, 2014, 03:31:56 PM
Under 100$ pref
IINM the only thing that'll get you close to there is a used 50 or 35 f/1.8.

I have a 50 f/1.8 but I often find it to be a bit long for my taste, I think I would prefer a 35. The problem is there is no 35 for Canon.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 15, 2014, 03:55:28 PM
IINM the only thing that'll get you close to there is a used 50 or 35 f/1.8.

I have a 50 f/1.8 but I often find it to be a bit long for my taste, I think I would prefer a 35. The problem is there is no 35 for Canon.
i have a nikon
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 15, 2014, 04:08:21 PM
i have a nikon
I know, that's why I suggested the 35. :)
I was just explaining why I don't have one.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: rots5 on September 15, 2014, 04:09:59 PM
I know, that's why I suggested the 35. :)
I was just explaining why I don't have one.
oh oh... sorry

ok i iwll look on ebay/craigslist and b&h used thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on September 15, 2014, 06:15:04 PM
IINM the only thing that'll get you close to there is a used 50 or 35 f/1.8.

I have a 50 f/1.8 but I often find it to be a bit long for my taste, I think I would prefer a 35. The problem is there is no 35 for Canon.
What do you primarily use it for? Longer is better for most portraits and a 50mm on DX should be fine.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on October 02, 2014, 10:37:41 PM
Had some fun playing with these cameras today.... No words
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on October 05, 2014, 12:51:36 PM
Which version is better?

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2946/15262353320_1c712a53ba_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/pfFxUL)

(https://farm3.staticflickr.com/2948/15262408240_2dcfb7ac7c_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/pfFQeE)

If I wanted to just make the bridge darker- what would be the easiest way to do so in PS?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 05, 2014, 12:53:02 PM
Which version is better?

(https://www.flickr.com/photos/95995231@N08/15262353320/)

(https://www.flickr.com/photos/95995231@N08/15262408240/)

If I wanted to just make the bridge darker- what would be the easiest way to do so in PS?

Pictures aren't showing up.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on October 05, 2014, 12:54:54 PM
Pictures aren't showing up.

Not sure why? They are linked to Flickr... Is there a size limit when linking?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 05, 2014, 12:55:26 PM
No limit.

Are the picture private?

ETA: The links are clickable now, though.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 05, 2014, 12:58:06 PM
If I wanted to just make the bridge darker- what would be the easiest way to do so in PS?

Layer the two versions and use a layer mask to paint in only the bridge. IMO there's too much glow and fuzziness to make this easy or clean, but give it a try anyway.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on October 05, 2014, 12:59:55 PM
No limit.

Are the picture private?

ETA: The links are clickable now, though.

It's shared publicly. The files are rather large- maybe that's why they're not loading

ETA: fixed
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on October 05, 2014, 01:00:54 PM
Layer the two versions and use a layer mask to paint in only the bridge. IMO there's too much glow and fuzziness to make this easy or clean, but give it a try anyway.

The sunflare I can't help, but the noise I added purposely for texture.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 05, 2014, 01:03:18 PM
The sunflare I can't help, but the noise I added purposely for texture.

Try darkening the bridge first and then add the texture. Should make things simpler.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordyk on October 29, 2014, 04:39:40 PM
can anyone give some tips how to use the Canon G15. to me its a fancy camera but i would love to use some good features.  Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on November 06, 2014, 03:02:22 AM
Sometimes you just can't get the picture.

For example, this incredible sunrise over Twin Falls, ID. By the time I was able to get to where I maybe could've got a half decent shot the magic was gone.

(https://farm6.staticflickr.com/5608/15102868424_afb9f6922f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/21774049@N05/410sZ4)

Oh well, you win some you lose some...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: avadah on November 08, 2014, 12:20:17 PM
I have a Sony HX50V. I see now that it's not the greatest camera for taking pictures of my toddler because it's too slow and it either misses the shot or comes out blurry. I have it set to Intelligent Auto. Is there a different setting that would be better? (Not just an auto setting even a custom setting)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on November 20, 2014, 08:00:08 PM
Hi guys. So I'm going to be in Jersey city of Shabbat. Right by the Hudson.
If the weather is nice I want to catch the sunrise over Manhatten.
Quick lesson on setting and stuff I should use?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on November 20, 2014, 10:51:23 PM
Hi guys. So I'm going to be in Jersey city of Shabbat. Right by the Hudson.
If the weather is nice I want to catch the sunrise over Manhatten.
Quick lesson on setting and stuff I should use?
After reading up on it. It seams I'll only be able to get the silhouette look.
Idk if I want to go crazy and wake up to early for that on a Sunday.
Title: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: YG on November 21, 2014, 11:20:48 AM
If you're interested/game to dabble in HDR you will have more options.
HDR isn't for everyone. Some people love it some don't (to say the least)

Also, sunrise is a very dynamic time and things change quickly. There may be time when the level of sunlight will allow you to take nice shots that have manageable dynamic range and the lighting can be quite nice. Warm and coming from the side which can make for some very interesting photos.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on November 25, 2014, 04:11:28 AM
Stunning Product Photography with an iPhone and a Desk Lamp

https://fstoppers.com/bts/stunning-product-photography-iphone-and-desk-lamp-46893?utm_reader=feedly
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on November 25, 2014, 12:24:33 PM
Stunning Product Photography with an iPhone and a Desk Lamp

https://fstoppers.com/bts/stunning-product-photography-iphone-and-desk-lamp-46893?utm_reader=feedly

actually,

these are what were used

Quote
LIGHTING SETUP:

Halogen lamp (IKEA)
LED torchlights (LED Lenser P7)
Translumfoil from Modulor.de
Smartphone on a tripod (remote triggered using the earphone cable)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on November 25, 2014, 12:29:55 PM
Why am I finding that my P&S shots were able to capture a blue sky as well as a properly lit subject a lot better than a DSLR? I'm sick of washed out whites...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on November 25, 2014, 12:55:08 PM
Why am I finding that my P&S shots were able to capture a blue sky as well as a properly lit subject a lot better than a DSLR? I'm sick of washed out whites...

What metering mode are you on?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on November 25, 2014, 01:29:53 PM
What metering mode are you on?

spot
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on November 25, 2014, 01:42:41 PM
spot

As I suspected ;). Put it in matrix (Nikon) or evaluative (Canon) and watch the problem go away.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on November 25, 2014, 02:01:47 PM
actually,

these are what were used
The point is no fancy equipment - desk lamp, led flashlight etc.

Eta - title is theirs, not mine...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on December 22, 2014, 10:19:51 PM
Any thoughts on the value of Schultz Photography online course? Discount rate is $97
http://my.shultzphotoschool.com/enroll-open-m51/
My wife wants to get it for me for Chanukkah. I have T3i, 18-55 kit lens, nifty fifty, 70-300mm and canon 10-20mm lens along with an external flash.  I am looking for some help (Been over a year...wow!) getting better.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on December 22, 2014, 10:25:47 PM
Any thoughts on the value of Schultz Photography online course? Discount rate is $97
http://my.shultzphotoschool.com/enroll-open-m51/
My wife wants to get it for me for Chanukkah. I have T3i, 18-55 kit lens, nifty fifty, 70-300mm and canon 10-20mm lens along with an external flash.  I am looking for some help (Been over a year...wow!) getting better.

Looks pretty good from their site. I like the fact that they don't seem stuffy like some other places do.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on December 22, 2014, 10:37:11 PM
Looks pretty good from their site. I like the fact that they don't seem stuffy like some other places do.
Thank! I'll sign up and let the oilam know how it goes. 30 day money back guarantee as well so no risk.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ari9 on December 22, 2014, 11:04:28 PM
Thank! I'll sign up and let the oilam know how it goes. 30 day money back guarantee as well so no risk.
yes please do!
enjoy :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Toasted on December 31, 2014, 03:56:40 PM
Waiting to hear how the Shultz classes are going. Any way for a tzibur to be mishtatef (nusach Amazon prime, v'hamavin yavin)?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on December 31, 2014, 06:44:58 PM
How to Take Pictures of POTUS Like the Official White House Photographer

http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/how-to-take-pictures-of-potus
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: TimT on December 31, 2014, 07:00:33 PM
How to Take Pictures of POTUS Like the Official White House Photographer

http://thecreatorsproject.vice.com/blog/how-to-take-pictures-of-potus
So this photo of michelle was done purposely ?  :)
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/26/article-1390986-0C44C00400000578-37_634x407.jpg
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on December 31, 2014, 07:44:33 PM
So this photo of michelle was done purposely ?  :)
http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/05/26/article-1390986-0C44C00400000578-37_634x407.jpg

Me and my wife ALOL
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy2 on January 04, 2015, 10:37:22 PM
Me and my wife ALOL

+1!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 05, 2015, 10:37:21 AM
Waiting to hear how the Shultz classes are going. Any way for a tzibur to be mishtatef (nusach Amazon prime, v'hamavin yavin)?
Been mad busy the last couple weeks, so only did the first couple lessons. So far some good general tips -framing your subjext, rule of thirds, get down to eye level.
I think the first 7 lessons may be free online. Not sure.
They so far seemed geared toward photography of kids/people.  Has a mix of blog like lessons and videos. I like it so far.



As an aside - Post 2500!!! New Status!!! 8)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Toasted on January 05, 2015, 10:51:16 AM
Been mad busy the last couple weeks, so only did the first couple lessons. So far some good general tips -framing your subject, rule of thirds, get down to eye level.
I think the first 7 lessons may be free online. Not sure.
They so far seemed geared toward photography of kids/people.  Has a mix of blog like lessons and videos. I like it so far.

As an aside - Post 2500!!! New Status!!! 8)

His free lessons are actually pretty good.
Congrats on the new status!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on January 06, 2015, 10:12:53 PM
IME even with my 50 I often find myself without enough space for the shot I want. (when shooting candids etc.)
I have a 50 f/1.8 but I often find it to be a bit long for my taste, I think I would prefer a 35. The problem is there is no 35 for Canon.
Somehow I didn't realize this until now, but apparently the Canon 50mm f/1.8 is a full frame lens, not APS-c.
So if I understand how it works correctly, for me it's effectively a 80mm lens? (50*1.6=80)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 06, 2015, 10:19:15 PM
Somehow I didn't realize this until now, but apparently the Canon 50mm f/1.8 is a full frame lens, not APS-c.
So if I understand how it works correctly, for me it's effectively a 80mm lens? (50*1.6=80)

Correct.

All lenses - including these that are for APS-C only - are marked with full-frame equivalents .
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on January 06, 2015, 10:41:38 PM
All lenses - including these that are for APS-C only - are marked with full-frame equivalents .
ok, I think I get it now.

so my 17-50mm is effectively ~27-80mm, and if I put a 24-70mm lens on an APS-C camera it would effectively be 38-112

ETA: "effectively" was probably not the best choice of word, it's probably more like "equivalent to __________ in full frame"
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 06, 2015, 10:52:15 PM
ok, I think I get it now.

so my 17-50mm is effectively ~27-80mm, and if I put a 24-70mm lens on an APS-C camera it would effectively be 38-112

ETA: "effectively" was probably not the best choice of word, it's probably more like "equivalent to __________ in full frame"

Exactly.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on January 07, 2015, 10:01:59 PM
@SF
My lens and camera were inundated with fine grained Thai sand, need advice how best to clean it. The sand has gotten under the barrels of the lens and they feel really gritty when turning.
I have Olympus 12-40 2.8 Pro which is supposedly dustproof and splashproof, and a Panasonic GX7.
TIA!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 07, 2015, 10:09:28 PM
@SF
My lens and camera were inundated with fine grained Thai sand, need advice how best to clean it. The sand has gotten under the barrels of the lens and they feel really gritty when turning.
I have Olympus 12-40 2.8 Pro which is supposedly dustproof and splashproof, and a Panasonic GX7.
TIA!

Oy oy.

Sand is the worst thing to get in a lens. It generally requires a complete disassembly and should only be done by a pro.

Now if it's only the grittiness that's bothering you, maybe you could live with it. But the danger is the grains traveling further and possibly scratching the lens elements.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on January 10, 2015, 10:26:16 PM
Oy oy.

Sand is the worst thing to get in a lens. It generally requires a complete disassembly and should only be done by a pro.

Now if it's only the grittiness that's bothering you, maybe you could live with it. But the danger is the grains traveling further and possibly scratching the lens elements.
Supposedly the lens is dustproof, should I still be worried? I could live with the grittiness assuming that a full disassembly will probably cost me half the price of the lens.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 10, 2015, 10:54:49 PM
Supposedly the lens is dustproof, should I still be worried? I could live with the grittiness assuming that a full disassembly will probably cost me half the price of the lens.

Sand is not dust... they behave very differently. I'd say that if you could live with the grittiness then do so. You'd need a very serious amount of damage before it starts showing up in your pictures, just keep an eye out for any abnormalities.

I went to Alaska with a chip in my front element at least an 1/8 of an inch deep and half an inch long. It was completely invisible. Granted that was a long lens and yours is a wide one (so smaller issues could show up earlier), but still - some sand is not the end of the world most of the time.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: jaywhy on January 11, 2015, 10:21:40 PM
Sand is not dust... they behave very differently. I'd say that if you could live with the grittiness then do so. You'd need a very serious amount of damage before it starts showing up in your pictures, just keep an eye out for any abnormalities.

I went to Alaska with a chip in my front element at least an 1/8 of an inch deep and half an inch long. It was completely invisible. Granted that was a long lens and yours is a wide one (so smaller issues could show up earlier), but still - some sand is not the end of the world most of the time.
Thanks!

When I get home, I'll try to vacuum out some of the sand but it seems to be resolving itself slowly.
That lens was smooth as butter before :'(
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Toasted on January 12, 2015, 03:42:11 PM
If I buy one book on photography, what should it be? I'm on the fence between http://www.amazon.com/Tony-Northrups-DSLR-Book-Photography/dp/0988263408/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8  and http://www.amazon.com/dp/032177664X/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=27QBDTX2VC1VA&coliid=I1RKKB10T8TSOW.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on January 12, 2015, 03:46:34 PM
If I buy one book on photography, what should it be? I'm on the fence between http://www.amazon.com/Tony-Northrups-DSLR-Book-Photography/dp/0988263408/ref=asap_bc?ie=UTF8  and http://www.amazon.com/dp/032177664X/ref=wl_it_dp_o_pC_nS_ttl?_encoding=UTF8&colid=27QBDTX2VC1VA&coliid=I1RKKB10T8TSOW.

From snapshots to great shots as a fantastic series.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SLP on January 12, 2015, 10:22:32 PM
When buying a memory card for the Sony A600, how fast of a write speed should I be looking for?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Toasted on January 12, 2015, 10:53:25 PM
From snapshots to great shots as a fantastic series.
Thanks. I'll probably start with the portrait one as that's kind of my main interest.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordyk on January 13, 2015, 05:48:19 PM
any videos or youtube series to help me understand the features on my canon g15? a simple youtube search didnt bring up anything.  TIA
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ari9 on January 15, 2015, 05:49:58 PM
Been mad busy the last couple weeks, so only did the first couple lessons. So far some good general tips -framing your subjext, rule of thirds, get down to eye level.
I think the first 7 lessons may be free online. Not sure.
They so far seemed geared toward photography of kids/people.  Has a mix of blog like lessons and videos. I like it so far.

they're having discounted enrollment again. would you recommend this?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on January 15, 2015, 06:16:10 PM
they're having discounted enrollment again. would you recommend this?
Been so busy that I've barely done the first 2 lessons so I can't make a fair recommendation. I like the style and it's an easy read but I can't tell much more than that
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ari9 on January 15, 2015, 06:56:14 PM
Been so busy that I've barely done the first 2 lessons so I can't make a fair recommendation. I like the style and it's an easy read but I can't tell much more than that
thanks. I checked out the free lessons and been getting the emails so considering it. I have another few hours to decide
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on January 26, 2015, 08:12:49 PM
Tips for shooting in the blizzard? Good setting for capturing the snow plows in action etc...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on February 01, 2015, 08:43:01 AM
DSLR shutter in slow-motion (http://www.engadget.com/2015/02/01/dslr-shutter-slow-mo/)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wysiwyg on February 02, 2015, 04:34:14 AM
Hey SF, just wanted to say thanks for these lessons, I recently purchased a Canon S110 and everything makes a lot more sense, with your help!

Don't mean to nudge but any idea when we should expect future lessons? eagerly waiting!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on February 02, 2015, 05:58:50 AM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/travel/travel_news/article-2931290/Experts-reveal-ultimate-travel-photography-tips.html
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: BarryLincoln on February 08, 2015, 03:30:32 PM
Looking for an expert's opinion - I have a t3i and my setting are set for super fine, large images that tend to be 4-8 MB each.  Now after 1000s of picture, space is becoming an issue.  For a casual, family photographer, what's the optimal setting to keep the camera on - want to preserve the integrity of the pictures, but also don't want them to take up a ton of space... thoughts?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 08, 2015, 04:18:06 PM
Looking for an expert's opinion - I have a t3i and my setting are set for super fine, large images that tend to be 4-8 MB each.  Now after 1000s of picture, space is becoming an issue.  For a casual, family photographer, what's the optimal setting to keep the camera on - want to preserve the integrity of the pictures, but also don't want them to take up a ton of space... thoughts?

A 2TB hard drive costs under $100 and holds hundreds of thousands of pictures...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: BarryLincoln on February 08, 2015, 04:25:40 PM
A 2TB hard drive costs under $100 and holds hundreds of thousands of pictures...

Recommendations for a good external hard drive? Seagate? Western Digital? Others?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 08, 2015, 04:38:47 PM
Recommendations for a good external hard drive? Seagate? Western Digital? Others?

I use those as well as Toshiba.

But you'd be better off asking in one of the computer threads, you'd probably get better advice there.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 08, 2015, 11:56:53 PM
Talking about space is it worth it for me to store all my pics after I am done in LR plus the originals from before LR editing? Right now I keep all my original RAW files plus the finished product after I export from LR and I was wondering what others do. Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 09, 2015, 12:16:37 AM
Talking about space is it worth it for me to store all my pics after I am done in LR plus the originals from before LR editing? Right now I keep all my original RAW files plus the finished product after I export from LR and I was wondering what others do. Thanks!

Depends. For family and candid pictures once I'm happy with the edits I get rid of the RAWs. For landscape or similar photography I will keep the RAWs of all my picks, as well as some which may have "potential". I find that with each successive iteration or LR/ACR I am able to do things with my pictures which hasn't been possible till now. Many of my favorite pictures are those which were hopelessly lost (i. e. a landscape shot at ISO 6400 and was chock full of noise), but were able to be rescued once the technology improved.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 09, 2015, 12:39:41 AM
Depends. For family and candid pictures once I'm happy with the edits I get rid of the RAWs. For landscape or similar photography I will keep the RAWs of all my picks, as well as some which may have "potential". I find that with each successive iteration or LR/ACR I am able to do things with my pictures which hasn't been possible till now. Many of my favorite pictures are those which were hopelessly lost (i. e. a landscape shot at ISO 6400 and was chock full of noise), but were able to be rescued once the technology improved.
That's seems like a great strategy. This way you aren't inundated with endless amounts of raw pics yet you retain the option to improve the ones that you feel with better technology you'll have better results with. Going to start doing that, thanks!

I recently came back from safari and I am trying to put together a video from all the video my wife shot along with the photos I took. I basically want to do some minor video editing as well as mix the photos with the videos. Is there a good program to do that in that I won't need to shell out a lot of money as well as go through a steep learning curve for something I doubt I will do that often? Thank you!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on February 09, 2015, 07:32:32 AM
That's seems like a great strategy. This way you aren't inundated with endless amounts of raw pics yet you retain the option to improve the ones that you feel with better technology you'll have better results with. Going to start doing that, thanks!

I recently came back from safari and I am trying to put together a video from all the video my wife shot along with the photos I took. I basically want to do some minor video editing as well as mix the photos with the videos. Is there a good program to do that in that I won't need to shell out a lot of money as well as go through a steep learning curve for something I doubt I will do that often? Thank you!
Windows movie maker is the very basic one to do it and comes with every Windows computer. You can also use Adobe Premier Pro which is much more advanced, if you know how to use it but that's not cheap though. If you happen to have an ASUS computer you can download for free Asus Video Manager which is also a good program for free.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wysiwyg on February 09, 2015, 09:37:18 AM
That's seems like a great strategy. This way you aren't inundated with endless amounts of raw pics yet you retain the option to improve the ones that you feel with better technology you'll have better results with. Going to start doing that, thanks!

I recently came back from safari and I am trying to put together a video from all the video my wife shot along with the photos I took. I basically want to do some minor video editing as well as mix the photos with the videos. Is there a good program to do that in that I won't need to shell out a lot of money as well as go through a steep learning curve for something I doubt I will do that often? Thank you!

Blackmagic recently released Davinci Resolve in a lite version; it's supposed to be quite good, haven't gotten a chance to check it out yet... it may have a steep learning curve...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on February 09, 2015, 08:18:53 PM
Windows movie maker is the very basic one to do it and comes with every Windows computer. You can also use Adobe Premier Pro which is much more advanced, if you know how to use it but that's not cheap though. If you happen to have an ASUS computer you can download for free Asus Video Manager which is also a good program for free.
Thanks I started playing around with Windows movie maker looks like it's pretty simple to add video and pictures however I haven't seen if there's a way to fade the videos and make the transition between still and video smooth.

Blackmagic recently released Davinci Resolve in a lite version; it's supposed to be quite good, haven't gotten a chance to check it out yet... it may have a steep learning curve...
Thanks for the tip - I read a great review about this program online I think I will try it and see if I can figure it out. Seems like there's more potential than the windows alternative so I am going to give it a try and worst case I'll go with windows.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on February 09, 2015, 08:20:57 PM
Thanks I started playing around with Windows movie maker looks like it's pretty simple to add video and pictures however I haven't seen if there's a way to fade the videos and make the transition between still and video smooth.
Thanks for the tip - I read a great review about this program online I think I will try it and see if I can figure it out. Seems like there's more potential than the windows alternative so I am going to give it a try and worst case I'll go with windows.
Next to "Home". Click "animations"
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: efflpetzel on February 10, 2015, 01:33:05 PM
whats the best way/program to convert a few hundred pics from raw to jpeg
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 10, 2015, 01:52:28 PM
whats the best way/program to convert a few hundred pics from raw to jpeg

Straight conversion without any edits? The software that came with the camera should do it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on February 14, 2015, 07:03:25 PM
When taking pictures in a dim lighted room with a flash (without lighting equipment) is there a way to avoid shadows?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on February 14, 2015, 07:11:12 PM
Are there any lessons on flash?
The flash settings go from +1 to -1. With 20 points in between. How do I know the best settings.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on February 14, 2015, 07:18:47 PM
When taking pictures in a dim lighted room with a flash (without lighting equipment) is there a way to avoid shadows?

If you have only one light source you'll have shadows. You could minimize them by bouncing the flash.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 14, 2015, 07:22:17 PM
If you have only one light source you'll have shadows. You could minimum them by bouncing the flash.

And by putting more distance between your subject and the wall (if that's where the shadows are).

A diffuser will also make the shadows less harsh.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on February 14, 2015, 07:23:51 PM
Are there any lessons on flash?
The flash settings go from +1 to -1. With 20 points in between. How do I know the best settings.

There's never a "best setting"; it wholly depends on the situation.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Galitzyaner on February 15, 2015, 02:01:34 AM
I hope my question is not too annoying, and I hope I merit an answer:

Say one has a budget for a camera of up the $800, and they walk tomorrow into a camera store.
Purpose of the camera would mostly be for travel, and capturing life's precious moments.
Which camera would you recommend for them considering they are for the most part an amateure at photographing?

A) <$800 budget.  B) <$600 budget.  C) <$400 budget.

TYVM in advance!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on February 15, 2015, 02:32:42 AM
I hope my question is not too annoying, and I hope I merit an answer:

Say one has a budget for a camera of up the $800, and they walk tomorrow into a camera store.
Purpose of the camera would mostly be for travel, and capturing life's precious moments.
Which camera would you recommend for them considering they are for the most part an amateure at photographing?

A) <$800 budget.  B) <$600 budget.  C) <$400 budget.

TYVM in advance!
Here is my advice. To answer your question B) <$600

There is obviously no "one answer that fits everyone", but i would get (or more accurate "got") a standard mirrorless camera with about 10-16 mp. 5X+ optical zoom and a (at least) 24-64 mm lens. Make sure to do your own research, don't rely only on the merchants words.   
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Galitzyaner on February 15, 2015, 01:09:53 PM
Here is my advice. To answer your question B) <$600

There is obviously no "one answer that fits everyone", but i would get (or more accurate "got") a standard mirrorless camera with about 10-16 mp. 5X+ optical zoom and a (at least) 24-64 mm lens. Make sure to do your own research, don't rely only on the merchants words.
To clarify. I was asking 3 separate questions, one for A, B, and C. 
I'm asking what the best camera someone would recommend today under $800 for an amateure.
I understand to some this question may sound ridiculous, but that's why I say, for an amateure.
Imagine you were buying someone a gift and they asked for a camera, but they really don't know much about cameras (yes, they obviously know the most basic functions).
Which one would you buy (for the above budgets).

Hope my question is clearer now.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on February 15, 2015, 01:13:56 PM
To clarify. I was asking 3 separate questions, one for A, B, and C. 
I'm asking what the best camera someone would recommend today under $800 for an amateure.
I understand to some this question may sound ridiculous, but that's why I say, for an amateure.
Imagine you were buying someone a gift and they asked for a camera, but they really don't know much about cameras (yes, they obviously know the most basic functions).
Which one would you buy (for the above budgets).

Hope my question is clearer now.
http://www.amazon.com/Sony-Alpha-Interchangeable-Camera-16-50mm/dp/B00I8BICB2/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1424023952&sr=8-1&keywords=sony+mirrorless

http://www.amazon.com/Sony-NEX-5TL-Compact-Interchangeable-Digital/dp/B00ENZRP38/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1424023952&sr=8-2&keywords=sony+mirrorless
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordyk on March 04, 2015, 11:09:31 AM
i have the canon G15. what is the best quality sd card to buy?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on March 04, 2015, 04:43:11 PM
what is the best quality sd card to buy?
http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg663029#msg663029
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on March 04, 2015, 04:46:50 PM
I'm very curious what the poll results would like like if it ran again now.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: avadah on March 05, 2015, 08:27:47 AM
Can the Sony Cybershot HX50V be remote controlled with a Galaxy S5?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 05, 2015, 10:14:10 AM
Can the Sony Cybershot HX50V be remote controlled with a Galaxy S5?

Yes.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: @Yehuda on March 05, 2015, 11:04:26 AM
I've never been a big picture guy. I had a digital camera (regular Canon Powershot or something like that) and lost it in Meiron while in Yeshiva. Since then, all pictures have been smartphone pics. I like carrying just 1 device and not having to worry about another thing to lose while I'm travelling. Additionally, on my cell phone and on a computer screen, I think the pictures are great. I do notice that a picture from a DSLR looks clearer online, but I'm find with my cell phone pics on screen. However, when I print them in books or blow them up on canvases, they seem to always come out darker and not as clear as when they were on my screen.

Is that one of the big differences between pics from a cell phone vs. a "real" camera?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 05, 2015, 11:13:04 AM
I've never been a big picture guy. I had a digital camera (regular Canon Powershot or something like that) and lost it in Meiron while in Yeshiva. Since then, all pictures have been smartphone pics. I like carrying just 1 device and not having to worry about another thing to lose while I'm travelling. Additionally, on my cell phone and on a computer screen, I think the pictures are great. I do notice that a picture from a DSLR looks clearer online, but I'm find with my cell phone pics on screen. However, when I print them in books or blow them up on canvases, they seem to always come out darker and not as clear as when they were on my screen.

Is that one of the big differences between pics from a cell phone vs. a "real" camera?

Yes, among others. The issue you're talking about is more or less dynamic range, and will be infinitely better with a real camera.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: avadah on March 05, 2015, 12:58:40 PM
Yes.
Thanks. I see now it's not letting me download the app because I'miss in Israel.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: @Yehuda on March 06, 2015, 11:26:46 AM
Yes, among others. The issue you're talking about is more or less dynamic range, and will be infinitely better with a real camera.
Thanks. My second biggest concern is getting my pictures online. I love that I can send pics straight from my phone to FB. Can real cameras do that? Need to pay for a data plan? Only with wifi?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on March 06, 2015, 11:33:29 AM
Thanks. My second biggest concern is getting my pictures online. I love that I can send pics straight from my phone to FB. Can real cameras do that? Need to pay for a data plan? Only with wifi?

Honestly, from the sound of it, you're probably better off sticking with your smartphone. If you are willing to sacrifice the quality of the picture for the convenience of having a camera in your phone and not having to bother with transferring, uploading etc., then a phone is the way too go.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: @Yehuda on March 06, 2015, 12:21:37 PM
Honestly, from the sound of it, you're probably better off sticking with your smartphone. If you are willing to sacrifice the quality of the picture for the convenience of having a camera in your phone and not having to bother with transferring, uploading etc., then a phone is the way too go.
Figures. Yeah, I'm not one who's into the quality of the pic too much, especially since most of my picture-viewing is done on phones/computers. It would be nice somehow to get high quality prints for the times I do print, but if there's no convenient way to do that, then you're right - I'll just stick with my smartphone.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: EJB on March 06, 2015, 01:39:24 PM
Thanks. My second biggest concern is getting my pictures online. I love that I can send pics straight from my phone to FB. Can real cameras do that? Need to pay for a data plan? Only with wifi?

There are real cameras that can do that. But they usually require wifi.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 06, 2015, 01:51:28 PM
Figures. Yeah, I'm not one who's into the quality of the pic too much, especially since most of my picture-viewing is done on phones/computers. It would be nice somehow to get high quality prints for the times I do print, but if there's no convenient way to do that, then you're right - I'll just stick with my smartphone.
Your tune will change once @yehuda Jr enters the frame 8)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 15, 2015, 12:15:03 AM
First time playing at night.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7624/16792417376_6ec2784a29_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: grodnoking on March 15, 2015, 12:47:56 AM
First time playing at night.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7624/16792417376_6ec2784a29_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on March 15, 2015, 01:30:50 AM
First time playing at night.
Keep on playing!! Looks great.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 15, 2015, 09:54:00 AM
First time playing at night.

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7624/16792417376_6ec2784a29_c.jpg)
What's the exposure info? Just Curious
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 20, 2015, 04:04:26 AM
Played again tonight:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7634/16663379877_7bc4c0620b_z.jpg)
The Milky way escaping from the rocks. (At least I think that is part of the Milky Way)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Emkay on March 20, 2015, 05:57:50 AM
Thanks. I see now it's not letting me download the app because I'miss in Israel.
There are apps to get around that
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 20, 2015, 08:01:31 AM
Played again tonight:

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7634/16663379877_7bc4c0620b_z.jpg)
The Milky way escaping from the rocks. (At least I think that is part of the Milky Way)

Yup, definitely Milky Way.

Amazing what even a bit of practice (and darker skies ;)) could accomplish. Great shot.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 20, 2015, 12:18:20 PM
Yup, definitely Milky Way.

Amazing what even a bit of practice (and darker skies ;)) could accomplish. Great shot.

So very true. I don't think I ever saw as many stars in my life as I did last night.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on March 20, 2015, 12:21:54 PM
So very true. I don't think I ever saw as many stars in my life as I did last night.

Nice shot,
Wanna share the settings you used? Kits lens ;) ...?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 20, 2015, 12:32:27 PM
Nice shot,
Wanna share the settings you used? Kits lens ;) ...?

Here you go. I was out in Joshua Tree National Park. It does help that I was in the middle of nowhere. When I left the spot where I took the picture I had about a 30 mile, 45 minute drive just to get out of the park, then another 55 minute drive back home.

Pentax K-50 Body.
Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED MC Super Wide Angle Lens (http://www.adorama.com/RKFE14MP.html)
Shutter Speed = 30
Aperture = 2.8
ISO = 3200

HT to Something Fishy for giving me all the advice and telling me about the lens
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: A3 on March 20, 2015, 01:14:03 PM
Nice,
I finally got the 50 1.8 prime.
Maybe ill go for that one next. looks solid.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 20, 2015, 01:19:29 PM
Nice,
I finally got the 50 1.8 prime.
Maybe ill go for that one next. looks solid.

Is a great lens. Will go to the Air Museum today and get some of the planes with it. Going to be interesting to see how they come out with this lens.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 20, 2015, 01:23:35 PM
Is a great lens. Will go to the Air Museum today and get some of the planes with it. Going to be interesting to see how they come out with this lens.

Trick is to get really close. Remember to mind your focus.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 20, 2015, 03:06:18 PM

Trick is to get really close. Remember to mind your focus.

On my way home now will post some in a few
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: alpicone on March 20, 2015, 03:22:51 PM
Looks like the last lesson was December 2013. Guess you are too busy traveling  ;D

So what do you say... time for another lesson or another Photo DO (closer than Iceland)?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 20, 2015, 04:00:22 PM
Here we go again. Taken at PSP Air Museum. All the planes were outside today due to an event tonight inside the hanger. All taken with the Rokinon 14mm f/2.8 IF ED MC Super Wide Angle Lens.

1945 Supermarine 379 Spitfire FR14E
(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8595/16688154890_6258efec2d_z.jpg)

Curtiss P40 Hawk+
(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7630/16253231344_aa7bba4832_z.jpg)

1958 North American AT-6G C/N 493402 // 2-P-7 North American SNJ-6 Texan
(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7599/16849711816_bc62fe80f3_z.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 20, 2015, 06:23:39 PM
Great pictures!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 20, 2015, 06:24:07 PM
Just took this through my living room window:

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8675/16850780156_1a11e4a57f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/T4n34j)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on March 20, 2015, 06:26:12 PM
Just took this through my living room window:
Does this belong in the Pros/cons of where you live thread? :)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 22, 2015, 10:11:32 PM
For a dashcam that records 1080p video at 15mbps, what speed and class SD card at minimum am I looking for? is a 30 MBps card OK? seems like that's close to 15x faster than is needed....
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 22, 2015, 10:28:39 PM
For a dashcam that records 1080p video at 15mbps, what speed and class SD card at minimum am I looking for? is a 30 MBps card OK? seems like that's close to 15x faster than is needed....

For video you need to look at the class rating. A class 10 (basically anything these days) will be perfect.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 22, 2015, 10:40:49 PM
For video you need to look at the class rating. A class 10 (basically anything these days) will be perfect.
Confused. If the video is recording at 15 megabits per second then why do I need anything with a minimum writes speed that is faster (in theory) than 2 Megabytes per second?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 22, 2015, 10:57:51 PM
Confused. If the video is recording at 15 megabits per second then why do I need anything with a minimum writes speed that is faster (in theory) than 2 Megabytes per second?

Like I said, the amount of MBps is completely irrelevant to video recording. What matters is the sustained write speed, which is expressed as a class rating.

MBps is how fast the card could write large chunks of days (images). Class rating is how much data the card could write in a continuous stream of smaller bits and pieces (video).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 22, 2015, 11:04:17 PM
Like I said, the amount of MBps is completely irrelevant to video recording. What matters is the sustained write speed, which is expressed as a class rating.

MBps is how fast the card could write large chunks of days (images). Class rating is how much data the card could write in a continuous stream of smaller bits and pieces (video).
I know, but if i understand what you said, and what I am seeing on https://www.sdcard.org/developers/overview/speed_class/, the class rating is the minimum sustained write speed. if the camera recordsfull HD at 15mbps why does it need a minimum of 10MBps  for full HD?  I feel like I am missing a key point.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 22, 2015, 11:19:59 PM
I know, but if i understand what you said, and what I am seeing on https://www.sdcard.org/developers/overview/speed_class/, the class rating is the minimum sustained write speed. if the camera recordsfull HD at 15mbps why does it need a minimum of 10MBps  for full HD?  I feel like I am missing a key point.

The key point you're missing is that the 15mbps your camera shoots does not get dumped onto the card once a second. Instead, it's spread out as a continuous stream.

For example, let's assume it writes continuously at 150kb every 1/100th of a second, or 15kb per 1/1000 sec. Could the card keep up with this constant stream, of will it have to stop for air? If it stops for even 1/30th of a second, you lose a frame of the video. To many breaths and your video will stutter.

The class rating will tell you how much data you could throw at the card before it needs to take a break. A camera shooting 1080p at 30fps (basically the standard these days) will need a card that's at least a class 10.

The fact that a card may be able to write 15MBps means that if you throw a chunk of data weighing 15MB, it'll take one second to record. 15MBps does not equal 30MB per 2 seconds or 75MB per 5 seconds; the card will not be able to sustain 15MBps continuously.

Hence:
Images: How large of a chunk could you throw at the card at once - xxMBps.
Video: How many tiny bits could you feed without stopping - Class x.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 22, 2015, 11:32:32 PM
The key point you're missing is that the 15mbps your camera shoots does not get dumped onto the card once a second. Instead, it's spread out as a continuous stream.

For example, let's assume it writes continuously at 150kb every 1/100th of a second, or 15kb per 1/1000 sec. Could the card keep up with this constant stream, of will it have to stop for air? If it stops for even 1/30th of a second, you lose a frame of the video. To many breaths and your video will stutter.

The class rating will tell you how much data you could throw at the card before it needs to take a break. A camera shooting 1080p at 30fps (basically the standard these days) will need a card that's at least a class 10.

The fact that a card may be able to write 15MBps means that if you throw a chunk of data weighing 15MB, it'll take one second to record. 15MBps does not equal 30MB per 2 seconds or 75MB per 5 seconds; the card will not be able to sustain 15MBps continuously.

Hence:
Images: How large of a chunk could you throw at the card at once - xxMBps.
Video: How many tiny bits could you feed without stopping - Class x.

So what is it about class 10 that tells me it can handle 1080p at 15mbps whereas class 2, 4,6,9,8 cannot? Does the class rating not mean it maintains a minimum stream of x mBps?
I think if it like the regular speed listed is the maximum bench press the card can handle, while the class is the minimum weight the card can carry in a backpack all day. To further the analogy, the camera is asking for a load of 15 mb or almost 2 MB to be carried around, so a card is needed that can handle that. If class 4 card can carry 4 MB around all day, then why is that not enough? What am I missing?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: srf60 on March 23, 2015, 12:20:56 AM
Hi SF. Thank you very much for all your info and energy that goes into  this thread and others, including your great TR's ( and phenomenal photos, of course).
I still prefer to read on paper or magazine versus from a screen, so which book on  photography do you recommend I should read?  Thanks.
If it has been answered already, please forgive me.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on March 23, 2015, 11:18:34 AM
Hi SF. Thank you very much for all your info and energy that goes into  this thread and others, including your great TR's ( and phenomenal photos, of course).
I still prefer to read on paper or magazine versus from a screen, so which book on  photography do you recommend I should read?  Thanks.
If it has been answered already, please forgive me.
SIYF
Search the thread for "books".  Understanding exposure is a great, very detailed series.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: srf60 on March 23, 2015, 02:53:50 PM
SIYF
Search the thread for "books".  Understanding exposure is a great, very detailed series.
Found it. Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: elibeli2 on March 26, 2015, 10:19:24 PM
Hey Fishey,

I just started to learn some photography and wanted to give you a huge thank you!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on March 26, 2015, 11:02:05 PM
Hey Fishey,

I just started to learn some photography and wanted to give you a huge thank you!

:)

Glad you like it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on March 27, 2015, 02:13:56 PM
Been away from the thread for a long time, nice to see the progression here. Keep it up!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on March 30, 2015, 11:22:35 PM
Downtown LA - (Too lazy to edit the RAW image.)

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8707/16984031072_a48342f435_c.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yesitsme on April 09, 2015, 12:36:50 AM
i have a canon power shot elph 300 HS
when flash is off 1st image it looks brighter and clearer
than when flash is on auto (and flashes) 2nd image it's much darker

any explanation? am i doing it wrong?

(the images where converted to png and shrunk in size to pass the Restrictions: 4 per post, maximum total size 512KB, maximum individual size 256KB)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 09, 2015, 01:04:55 AM
i have a canon power shot elph 300 HS
when flash is off 1st image it looks brighter and clearer
than when flash is on auto (and flashes) 2nd image it's much darker

any explanation? am i doing it wrong?

(the images where converted to png and shrunk in size to pass the Restrictions: 4 per post, maximum total size 512KB, maximum individual size 256KB)

A - The range of your flash is only around 12 feed or so. It won't reach the scene regardless.

B - Most of the flash's light is hitting your arm, which is perfectly exposed. This  will cause the camera to underexpose the rest of the scene.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yesitsme on April 09, 2015, 01:45:19 AM
A - The range of your flash is only around 12 feedt or so. It won't reach the scene regardless.

B - Most of the flash's light is hitting your arm daughters kepela, which is perfectly exposed. This  will cause the camera to underexpose the rest of the scene.
Thanks it makes sense what you're saying,

it's interesting that flash makes it worse, it doesn't recognize the existing light.

i had the same issue with my children in a crib that is less then 5 FT the background is dull "B" could explain the reason,

so when is it recommended to use flash? if you are in a dim room and want to get a crisp shot what to do? flash is only good if you want the closest object?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 09, 2015, 01:54:21 AM
Thanks it makes sense what you're saying,

it's interesting that flash makes it worse, it doesn't recognize the existing light.

i had the same issue with my children in a crib the background is dull "B" could explain the reason,

so when is it recommended to use flash? if you are in a dim room and want to get a crisp shot what to do? flash is only good if you want the closest object?

In order to light a room the flash has to be powerful enough. A P&S generally isn't.

If there is a significant distance (let's say 3 feed or more) between something in the foreground and the background and the flash hits the foreground, the background will go pretty much completely dark.

The flash on a P&S is relatively useless. It's only real use is probably in bright sunlight the open up shadows (counterintuitive, I know). 99% of the time till get better and more realistic looking pictures without the P&S flash.

ETA: To be clear - a terribly exposed picture is still better than no picture, or even sometimes a blurry picture. But you can't expect a puny little flash to be magical.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yesitsme on April 09, 2015, 02:05:09 AM
now you have something to add to the Pros & Cons (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg482578#msg482578)

you have anything to say about this
it's interesting that flash makes it worse, it doesn't recognize the existing light.
why does it get (look) darker then it actually is
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on April 09, 2015, 11:27:48 AM
now you have something to add to the Pros & Cons (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28108.msg482578#msg482578)

you have anything to say about thiswhy does it get (look) darker then it actually is

He said it already:
Quote
B - Most of the flash's light is hitting your arm, which is perfectly exposed. This  will cause the camera to underexpose the rest of the scene.

Meanwhile, if you want a more technical answer, the flash isn't making the scene darker, rather it is confusing the camera. Exposure, fyi, is the term used to determine how much light is recorded (or originally how much light the film was "exposed" to, back in the days before digital, hence the term). Too much "exposure" to light, and that part of the picture becomes pure white. Too little, and it becomes dark or even black if no light at all. Every camera has a limited amount of range it can see from the darkest darks to the brightest whites (known as dynamic range), so the camera tries to determine the best exposure to get what it thinks you want visible. Ever take a picture inside a room on a sunny day, and notice that the windows are too bright to see out of in the picture, but you could see the outdoors through it in real life? That's an example of the camera's limited dynamic range, and it has to make a judgement call when you take the picture- expose for the bright outdoors, or the person smiling closer to the camera? Usually it will be smart enough to determine the subject closer to you is more important than the light outside. If you've ever recorded video clips going from inside a room to outdoors, especially with a cell phone, you probably have noticed the outdoors is too bright at first (can't really see anything), then the camera quickly adjusts to the light outdoors by lowering the exposure. That's exposure adjustment in real-time.

What happened here, is  your flash reflected off of something close to the camera, off to the left. It appears to be an arm (or maybe a leg if you were wearing shorts and crouching? Hard to tell). The camera locked on to that as a close object properly illuminated, and guessed (incorrectly) that THIS is what you are trying to take a picture of. So it exposed for that instead of the background. Since it was so much brighter due to the proximity of your flash, the camera's exposure adjustment made the rest of the room too dark to see. If  you had taken the same picture without that body part protruding into the frame, the camera actually would have done a much better job. Even though Fishy is right about the flash being weak, I don't think it was too weak to actually help here. The problem was that something was in the way and confused the camera's metering system. Without that, the second picture would have been clearer than the first without a doubt in my mind.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: yesitsme on April 09, 2015, 01:39:05 PM
thank you Mordy for taking your time to educate me about exposure :)

He said it already:

i meant in his lesson thats linked to the wiki, for other people to learn about it
i think your comment about exposure should also be linked

It appears to be an arm (or maybe a leg if you were wearing shorts and crouching? Hard to tell).

it's my baby daughter sticking in her face trying to hop on the train at kids n action
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: benjie1305 on April 14, 2015, 10:17:54 AM
Trying to take more advantage of my camera my father gave me 3+ years back. If there is any specific advise, I'd very much appreciate it.

Olympus E-410 with a zuiko 14-42 and a zuiko 40-150 lens.

 Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordyk on April 20, 2015, 12:50:04 PM
going on a beach vacation and i really need some tips how to use my Canon G15. can anyone help me or guide me where in this thread it is discussed. TIA
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: cf on April 20, 2015, 02:03:11 PM
Just took this through my living room window:

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8675/16850780156_1a11e4a57f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/T4n34j)
Going crazy for this pic! Beautiful!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: efflpetzel on April 21, 2015, 01:54:45 PM
regarding memory cards my camera takes a regular SD card, I'm leaning into getting a micro sd card with an adapter for the versatility,

will it affect the speed?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 21, 2015, 02:01:24 PM
regarding memory cards my camera takes a regular SD card, I'm leaning into getting a micro sd card with an adapter for the versatility,

will it affect the speed?

IME it will.

What camera and card speed?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: efflpetzel on April 21, 2015, 02:53:45 PM
IME it will.

What camera and card speed?
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N2ROG9O/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 21, 2015, 02:55:05 PM
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00N2ROG9O/ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_3?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

I wouldn't use that card, regardless of speed or form factor...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: efflpetzel on April 21, 2015, 02:58:11 PM
I wouldn't use that card, regardless of speed or form factor...
I know that, but the price speed & size just can't be matched,

camera is a sony a5000
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 21, 2015, 03:00:51 PM
I know that, but the price speed & size just can't be matched,

It never fails to amaze me how people will risk losing all their (often irreplaceable) pictures for twenty bucks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: efflpetzel on April 21, 2015, 10:01:53 PM
I wouldn't use that card, regardless of speed or form factor...
would you say that if i'd be using it for a phone or tablet?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 22, 2015, 01:04:02 AM
would you say that if i'd be using it for a phone or tablet?

No. I actually sometimes use medium-quality cards in my phone myself. The distinction is that with my phone (and a  tablet would be similar) there is never anything irreplaceable. Every picture, document, and file gets uploaded to the cloud instantly, so there is never a realistic chance of loss. Worst case I spend a few minutes copying things back on.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Emkay on April 22, 2015, 02:14:16 AM
No. I actually sometimes use medium-quality cards in my phone myself. The distinction is that with my phone (and a  tablet would be similar) there is never anything irreplaceable. Every picture, document, and file gets uploaded to the cloud instantly, so there is never a realistic chance of loss. Worst case I spend a few minutes copying things back on.
Which cloud are they uploaded to?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 22, 2015, 08:18:45 AM
Which cloud are they uploaded to?

Pictures and videos to Dropbox, docs to Google, notes to Evermore, etc. etc.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordyk on April 26, 2015, 06:16:34 PM
going on a beach vacation and i really need some tips how to use my Canon G15. can anyone help me or guide me where in this thread it is discussed. TIA
bump
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 28, 2015, 11:39:13 PM
I need some help... anyone see anything wrong with the sky in either of these shots?

The color looks fine on my calibrated monitor and on my phone, but on my iPad the first two pictures look like they have purple skies. The third picture, although taken a couple of seconds after the second, appears normal.

I need a bigger sampling of screens in order to figure out whats going on here...

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8780/16934981677_78c78a7aef_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/2Z0155)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7619/17142380875_e7cf38e55f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/04yJ8e)

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8728/17141745981_33285eb964_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/fpb218)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on April 28, 2015, 11:52:55 PM
The first one looks purple, the second one looks just right and the third looks just a bit too bright a blue.

This feels like the dress all over again :P #whiteandgold
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 28, 2015, 11:53:52 PM
The first one looks purple, the second one looks just right and the third looks just a bit too bright a blue.

This feels like the dress all over again :P #whiteandgold

Oy, that's a new twist :D.

What device are you seeing it on?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DMYD on April 28, 2015, 11:54:09 PM
I need some help... anyone see anything wrong with the sky in either of these shots?

The color looks fine on my calibrated monitor and on my phone, but on my iPad the first two pictures look like they have purple skies. The third picture, although taken a couple of seconds after the second, appears normal.

I need a bigger sampling of screens in order to figure out whats going on here...

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8780/16934981677_78c78a7aef_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/2Z0155)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7619/17142380875_e7cf38e55f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/04yJ8e)

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8728/17141745981_33285eb964_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/fpb218)
I don't see purple I see a lighter color blue in the first 2 pictures.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on April 28, 2015, 11:54:22 PM
Looks fine to me, all three of them. Using a Macbook Retina.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SMS331 on April 28, 2015, 11:55:22 PM

The first one looks purple, the second one looks just right and the third looks just a bit too bright a blue.

This feels like the dress all over again :P #whiteandgold

+1
On iphone
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Achas Veachas on April 28, 2015, 11:57:24 PM
Oy, that's a new twist :D.

What device are you seeing it on?
Moto X 1st gen
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2015, 12:01:28 AM
Thanks all.

So far - definitely not an Apple issue (iPad and iPhone look purple, Mac looks fine). Possibly a mobile issue.

What's vexing me is the discrepancy between the last two pictures. They should be more or less identical...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on April 29, 2015, 12:04:24 AM
The second and third look about the same to me, though the third looks darker around the edges from the vignetting.
The first might have a slight purplish tint, but I wouldn't have noticed if you didn't say anything.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on April 29, 2015, 12:10:05 AM
The second and third look about the same to me, though the third looks darker around the edges from the vignetting.
The first might have a slight purplish tint, but I wouldn't have noticed if you didn't say anything.
Oy.

That was on my PC (with two different monitors.)

On my phone I'm seeing
The first one looks purple, the second one looks just right and the third looks just a bit too bright a blue.
Well, sort of. I think the third one looks right and the second is too dark of a blue.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on April 29, 2015, 12:12:32 AM
Oy.

That was on my PC (with two different monitors.)

On my phone I'm seeingWell, sort of. I think the third one looks right and the second is too dark of a blue.
Same here.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2015, 12:13:48 AM
I think I may have figured it out... Here the first two pictures, first the original and then what is (hopefully) the corrected version. Thoughts?

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8780/16934981677_78c78a7aef_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/2Z0155)

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8697/17121487109_802a6e099c_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/UGXip7)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7619/17142380875_e7cf38e55f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/04yJ8e)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7696/16687450123_727cff3889_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/65vCPj)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on April 29, 2015, 12:15:18 AM
I think I may have figured it out... Here the first two pictures, first the original and then what is (hopefully) the corrected version. Thoughts?
Looks good
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Centro on April 29, 2015, 12:15:23 AM
I think I may have figured it out... Here the first two pictures, first the original and then what is (hopefully) the corrected version. Thoughts?

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8780/16934981677_78c78a7aef_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/2Z0155)

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8697/17121487109_802a6e099c_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/UGXip7)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7619/17142380875_e7cf38e55f_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/04yJ8e)

(https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7696/16687450123_727cff3889_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/65vCPj)
On my phone now and the 2nd one looks the same as the 1st one on my computer.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2015, 12:24:21 AM
Looks good

On my phone now and the 2nd one looks the same as the 1st one on my computer.

Awesome! Looks like it's fixed, then.

Turns out the pictures were in the Adobe RGB color space, which doesn't play nice with mobile. Converted them to the sRGB space and that seemed to do the trick.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on April 29, 2015, 12:33:58 AM
While we're on the subject of this picture, it appears that I have to eat my words (in red) ;D:

Here are some of mine

I love love love the Road To Hana picture. The muted colors is not a treatment you see too often in this shot, and I think it works really well. It's a great way to differentiate your picture from the many others taken from this spot. The composition is spot on - from the bushes in the foreground (love that splash of red!) to the tree framing the left. The horizon is a drop crooked, but not to horribly. Also, if you would have raised the camera a couple of inches higher, you would have separated the top of the foreground bush from the far beach to create a smooth, continuous flow, mirroring the road above.

The one big issue this picture has is halos. This is completely due to post-processing, and could (and should ;)) absolutely be avoided. It's mostly apparent where the center of the mountain meets the clouds, and where the mountain intersects with the horizon. There should be a smooth transition, not a glow. You could also see a bit of it in the one blue spot in the sky.

(http://i61.tinypic.com/6y2ihd.jpg)


Sometimes you just can't get high enough; I wan't able to, either:

(https://farm9.staticflickr.com/8697/17121487109_802a6e099c_b.jpg) (https://www.flickr.com/gp/morrishersko/UGXip7)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on April 29, 2015, 01:40:12 AM
That's funny SF because i had recalled you original post correcting the picture on the Road to Hanna and was wondering if you would reference that when you posted you own  :)

Great pics! - How did you decide to use the shutter speed you used on the waves crashing on the rocks pic?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on April 29, 2015, 09:48:43 AM
Wow, forgot about this!! The reason there's so much halo-ing is because I didn't know how to use the grad filter yet, so to bring out the sky detail, I brought a 2nd version of the image into ACR and got the sky detail (it was a cloudy day), opened it in PS and erased the bottom of it. Leads to a lot of halo-ing. How was Kauai?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Toasted on May 04, 2015, 12:50:54 AM
I was using a t3i with a nifty fifty for family shots outdoors today. Was shooting wide open, but since some kids were closer than others (had them in 2 rows), either the front row or back row was blurry. :'( Obviously f/1.8 is not the right aperture for this situation.

What would be the right aperture to get everyone in focus while keeping the bokeh effect? Also, if im shooting at f3.5 or above(below, whatever the mavens call it), is the nifty fifty still sharper than my kit lens? If not, i'd definitely use the kit for the IS and the zoom range.

Thanks rebbey.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on May 04, 2015, 09:32:22 AM
The 50mm is definitly sharper than your kit lens if used correctly. Its very tempting for everyone to shoot f1.8 just because they "can" but the scenario you said will most likely occur (unless you are spot on). Because of the narrow depth of field at f1.8, you cannot focus on more than one object at different distances from the lens. Generally, if you step the lens up to f2.8 you will have more depth of field and still have the creamy bokeh you want (though, with a family you'd probably still need to step up higher for a greater depth of field). The "sweet spot" on this lens is probably more like f4.0 or f5.0.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Toasted on May 04, 2015, 09:42:49 AM
The 50mm is definitly sharper than your kit lens if used correctly. Its very tempting for everyone to shoot f1.8 just because they "can" but the scenario you said will most likely occur (unless you are spot on). Because of the narrow depth of field at f1.8, you cannot focus on more than one object at different distances from the lens. So, if you step the lens up to f2.8 you will have more depth of field and still have the creamy bokeh you want (though, with a family you'd probably still need to step up higher for a greater depth of field). The "sweet spot" on this lens is probably more like f4.0 or f5.0.
Thanks a lot. I guess I'll try the 4.0 range. Definitely worth sacrificing some bokeh for getting everyone tack sharp.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dywert on May 04, 2015, 05:22:42 PM
Can anyone tell me how to get my sony a500 to shot at an aperture above 5.6? It seems to stop there and not let me go any lower. Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on May 04, 2015, 11:27:50 PM
Can anyone tell me how to get my sony a500 to shot at an aperture above 5.6? It seems to stop there and not let me go any lower. Thanks.

Are you shooting with the included 16-50mm lens at 50mm (full zoom)?
If yes, then that is the max aperture at 50mm, you can only get bigger by zooming out.
(the max aperture on that lens is not for the entire range of the lens, rather it gradually changes from 3.5 at 16mm, till at 50mm your max is limited to 5.6)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on May 04, 2015, 11:33:34 PM
I'm not sure if this is right place for this, please let me know if it isn't.

What, in your opinion, is the best camera with great video under $600?

That means that video features (mic input, long record time w/o overheating and good constant AF) are a must.

I need a camera to shoot Camp video this summer, but I don't want to get a camcorder. for some reason (maybe sensor size?), all the sample videos from mirrorless cameras look way better (to me) that the video from good camcorders http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-video-camera/ (http://thewirecutter.com/reviews/best-video-camera/). Also, you get locked in to a single lens and it is probably worthless for still shots (which I'm probably going to get into thanks the the awesome lessons here! Thanks SF!).

I'm thinking the Panasonic Lumix G6 is the best one for this, as it fulfills those 3 requirements, while taking good pictures and letting you get creative with lenses (M4/3). (also, it has a good viewfinder)
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CFCTDD6 (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CFCTDD6)
http://www.eoshd.com/2013/07/panasonic-g6-review-the-gh2-redux/ (http://www.eoshd.com/2013/07/panasonic-g6-review-the-gh2-redux/)

My only issues with it (I think) is that it still uses a %100 contrast based AF, which may be an issue for video AF tracking.

Any advice is greatly appreciated!

Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dywert on May 05, 2015, 11:00:46 AM
Thanks for the explanation Zalc!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on May 05, 2015, 02:04:54 PM
I'm not sure if this is right place for this, please let me know if it isn't.
Here you go: http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0 (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=28454.0)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on May 11, 2015, 12:41:56 PM
@Zalc don't get a DSLR/mirrorless camera for a camp.
Get a camcorder. Not worth it for a job like that.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on May 11, 2015, 12:51:37 PM
@Zalc don't get a DSLR/mirrorless camera for a camp.
Get a camcorder. Not worth it for a job like that.

-1000

The only advantage a camcorders have is a larger zoom. Other than that, the Panasonic will be better in every way.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: RJ898 on May 11, 2015, 12:53:09 PM
I've done two 2 month camp videos. Image stabilization, larger DOF, better sound just to name a few.
If you're running and gunning for 2 months, you want a camcorder.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on May 11, 2015, 01:12:01 PM
I've done two 2 month camp videos. Image stabilization, larger DOF, better sound just to name a few.
If you're running and gunning for 2 months, you want a camcorder.

Thank you.
I already got the camera, so it's a moot point now.
I have a shotgun mic and the pana lens has good IS.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordy on May 13, 2015, 06:56:17 PM
@Zalc don't get a DSLR/mirrorless camera for a camp.
Get a camcorder. Not worth it for a job like that.
-1000

The only advantage a camcorders have is a larger zoom. Other than that, the Panasonic will be better in every way.
I've done two 2 month camp videos. Image stabilization, larger DOF, better sound just to name a few.
If you're running and gunning for 2 months, you want a camcorder.

Something Fishy, I happen to know RJ989, we both work in professional video. And he's not wrong. There are way more advantages to shooting with a camcorder, including the constant f-stop zoom and deeper DOF, not to mention more aggressive stabilization and ergonomics for video recording. Heck there's a good reason reality TV, News and documentary shooters still use camcorders. There are just designed to be better at those things.

I answered his question in the other thread regarding the G6 because he asked specifically which mirrorless camera, not whether or not a mirrorless camera was the right choice. I would have given a much more complicated answer had he asked that- but it sounded like he had already decided on an ILC, so I helped steer him towards the best option to fit his criteria.

The truth is, any of these DSLR/ILC/Still-cameras-turned-video-cameras are going to be somewhat of a compromise. They are designed to be stills cameras first, and the video features are there second. Their auto features sometimes get wonky in video- focusing will visibly hunt when DOF is too shallow, without proper stabilization gear you can't hold it as steady as a camcorder (IS is good, but still no replacement for handycam ergonomics), video-related functions and menus are buried in context and settings. Heck, you'll see the difference off the bat when zooming with the kit lens, the aperture snaps digitally into place while adjusting, which shows up on your footage as visible "clicks" getting darker or lighter. A camcorder will not only have a constant f-stop zoom built in, but will also have a servo motor to take the jitters out of the zoom, not to mention reduced rolling shutter due to the smaller sensor and often built in RS reduction.

The bottom line, and this is what I always tell people when they ask me what kind of camera to get for video:
A large sensor DSLR or ILC is capable of better looking video, but you're going to have to work a lot harder to get it. If you are looking for a point-and-shoot sort of video experience, you are not going to find that on ANY large chip ILC. You need a camcorder for that. Heck, there's a good reason camcorders are still popular. I just set up a studio with a Canon Vixia G30 for a client of mine. Its an excellent $1,200 camcorder that does things I sometimes wish my cameras did. In fact, I'm debating picking one up for run and gun situations.

That being said, Zalc sounds like someone who did his homework and is willing to work at it. The G6 is probably the closest thing to a camcorder without being one.
Thank you.
I already got the camera, so it's a moot point now.
I have a shotgun mic and the pana lens has good IS.

Nice. Practice, practice, practice! I might recommend a cheap shoulder mount or monopod to take out the jitters. Camcorders are just better at avoiding that.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on May 14, 2015, 07:58:42 PM
Their auto features sometimes get wonky in video- focusing will visibly hunt when DOF is too shallow, without proper stabilization gear you can't hold it as steady as a camcorder..
I see those issues a bit, but the camera is pretty consistent about AF tracking. Another issue is that the focus peaking is not nearly as good as on the Olympus OM-D cameras, to the point of being nearly useless most of the time. (maybe I just need more practice?)

Here is a quick sample: http://youtu.be/FbITjEdBAeY (http://youtu.be/FbITjEdBAeY)
As you see, it cannot come close to a good camcorder (canon G30):https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnHXhEXVFf0 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnHXhEXVFf0)

The G6 is probably the closest thing to a camcorder without being one.
Nice. Practice, practice, practice! I might recommend a cheap shoulder mount or monopod to take out the jitters. Camcorders are just better at avoiding that.

I already have some experience with it, I'll probably get a monopod.
What kind of things should I be looking to correct?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SLP on May 19, 2015, 08:52:34 PM
Any recommendations for a backpack for my Sony a6000? I have the kit lens plus 1 prime lens. I also want to fit the Dolica Proline travel tripod from Costco. I've been looking into both dedicated camera bags and regular backpacks but would love some suggestions.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: bk73 on May 29, 2015, 08:42:19 AM
Does anybody have any experience good or bad using artisan state for photo books?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on June 21, 2015, 01:54:54 AM
As soon as a card fills up, it gets separated from the camera. Each night, a full backup is done in duplicate, and the two backups kept in different locations.
I've been meaning to ask you for a while, what's your whole workflow here?
What happens once you get back from the trip and you have 2000 pictures (for example) saved in 3 places? where do you go from there?
i.e. what do you end up with when all is said and done? and what are the steps to getting there?
(I seem to remember you posting once what you end up keeping, but I can't seem to find it...)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 21, 2015, 02:43:54 AM
I've been meaning to ask you for a while, what's your whole workflow here?
What happens once you get back from the trip and you have 2000 pictures (for example) saved in 3 places? where do you go from there?
i.e. what do you end up with when all is said and done? and what are the steps to getting there?
(I seem to remember you posting once what you end up keeping, but I can't seem to find it...)

Firstly, this instant backup system gives me two copies, not three. Additionally, these will be clones of each other, so I won't have a couple of files in one place and a couple of files in the other. (This wasn't the case in Iceland, since from the time your laptop died we had to backup stuff on spare memory cards and on Chaiml's tablet. This left a bunch of files in different places and was absolutely not ideal. But normally I'd have one backup on a laptop and another on an external drive.)

So the workflow is something like this:

On-location backup:
1. Copy card to laptop.
2. Copy card to external drive.
3. Verify both copies by attempting to copy again and making sure everything triggers a "file already exists" error (very low-tech, but it does the job nicely).
4. Format memory card in camera to be ready for use again.

Sorting and culling:
5. Get home and copy the files to the appropriate folders. Verify from both backup versions that everything's there.
6. Import everything into Lightroom.
7. Start sorting and culling the files using flags, stars, and color tags. Obvious garbage (out of focus, mistaken pictures, etc.) get flagged as rejected. Bad pictures get 1 star, meh pictures get 2, and good ones get 3. A series of pictures that needs more intensive sorting (bracketed sequences, high-burst sequences, etc.) get the red label.
8. Do this process again. Most 1 stars get rejected. 2 stars move to either 1 or 3. Red gets either 1 or 3; bracketed sequences which need to be HDR tonemapped remain red.
9. Erase the worst of the rejects. A picture so out of focus you can't tell what the subject is, so blurry it's just strips, etc. Series outtakes sometimes also get erased at this point.

Editing:
10. 3 stars get edited in Lightroom's Develop module. If done, they get 5 stars. If they need further work in Photoshop, they get 4. HDRs get tonemapped and either 4 or 5 stars.
11. 4 stars move to Photoshop and get finished. Back to Lightroom where they get 5 stars.

Output:
12. 5 stars get different color labels depending on output (save to computer, Flickr, email, printing, photobook, etc.). If a single picture needs more than one color it gets virtual copies, each with the appropriate color tag.
13. One by one a color is selected and exported as needed.

Redo:
14. 3-6 months later, redo step 7. Chances are you'll find a hidden gem in the reject or 1 star pile, and not really like some previous favorites. Once you're a bit removed from when you took the picture, you're looking at things more objectively. You don't quite feel the emotions you felt while taking the photo, so you see things differently.
15. A year or two later, do this again. The advantage of this is that software is getting so much better, that some pictures that were rejected right away may now be salvageable. For example, a picture taken two years ago that was so underexposed it was completely black, could be easily fixed these days.

Erase:
16. Only once a few years have gone by do I start deleting remaining rejects and 1 stars. I also erase some original RAW files at that time, depending on the situation.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on June 21, 2015, 05:19:07 AM
Nice, thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: BarryLincoln on June 21, 2015, 01:45:22 PM
I have a Canon T3i and am thinking about purchasing a EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens to replace the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (that was part of the combo) and Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Telephoto Zoom lens.

I don't want to have to interchange lenses for every far/close shot and thought this lens would alleviate the need to do that.  And the lens is only $350 via Canon Refurb (http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-s-18-200mm-f-35-56-is-refurbished-17976-1).

Wanted to advice from the pros on what I am giving up and whether this is the right move - thoughts?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 21, 2015, 02:13:38 PM
I have a Canon T3i and am thinking about purchasing a EF-S 18-200mm f/3.5-5.6 IS lens to replace the EF-S 18-55mm f/3.5-5.6 IS Lens (that was part of the combo) and Canon EF 75-300mm f/4-5.6 III Telephoto Zoom lens.

I don't want to have to interchange lenses for every far/close shot and thought this lens would alleviate the need to do that.  And the lens is only $350 via Canon Refurb (http://shop.usa.canon.com/shop/en/catalog/ef-s-18-200mm-f-35-56-is-refurbished-17976-1).

Wanted to advice from the pros on what I am giving up and whether this is the right move - thoughts?

Besides for the obvious loss of range (200mm vs. 300) you're not giving up much. You may have a tad more distortion at either end, but probably not enough that you'll notice.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: srf60 on June 21, 2015, 02:16:37 PM
Besides for the obvious loss of range (200mm vs. 300) you're not giving up much. You may have a tad more distortion at either end, but probably not enough that you'll notice.
What about getting such a lens (18-200mm) from tamaron or sigma, which are much cheaper(about $200)??
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 21, 2015, 02:28:25 PM
What about getting such a lens (18-200mm) from tamaron or sigma, which are much cheaper(about $200)??

Tamron and Sigma (and Tokina) all make some really phenomenal lenses and some really terrible ones. On top of that, they often have multiple versions of similar lenses.

The Tamron 18-270 is not a bad lens (it has a better range that the Canon as well), but the Canon is better.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: srf60 on June 21, 2015, 03:10:51 PM
Tamron and Sigma (and Tokina) all make some really phenomenal lenses and some really terrible ones. On top of that, they often have multiple versions of similar lenses.

The Tamron 18-270 is not a bad lens (it has a better range that the Canon as well), but the Canon is better.
Thanks. Have seen tamaron 18-200,18-250,and 18-300, whats the 18-270?
Also what's your opinion sigma vs tamaron?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on June 21, 2015, 06:49:17 PM
I bought a set of filters including a CPL, FLD, UV, ND. But  i don't know when to use what. Can anyone share a link that explains when to use each filter?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on June 21, 2015, 10:27:45 PM
I bought a set of filters including a CPL, FLD, UV, ND. But  i don't know when to use what. Can anyone share a link that explains when to use each filter?
CPL: To cut down (or eliminate) on glare/reflections. (usually lowers the exposure ~1 stop IINM)
FLD: You shouldn't need it for a digital camera.
UV: Never.
ND: To reduce the shutter speed without overexposing. (e.g. for moving water)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on June 21, 2015, 10:37:34 PM
CPL: To cut down (or eliminate) on glare/reflections. (usually lowers the exposure ~1 stop IINM)
FLD: You shouldn't need it for a digital camera.
UV: Never.
ND: To reduce the shutter speed without overexposing. (e.g. for moving water)
Thanks so much. Isn't UV for the sun like UV glasses?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on June 21, 2015, 10:55:02 PM
Thanks so much. Isn't UV for the sun like UV glasses?
I'm not sure I understand your question, but I'll wait for Something Fishy to explain it properly :)
bekitzur, what you're losing (e.g. a lot of light -unless it's a very expensive filter) far outweighs whatever the gain is. (almost nothing IIRC)

On a side note, if you're serious about using the filters you probably want to throw these out and get decent ones. (I'm assuming this a cheap junk set.) You don't want hundreds or thousands spent on camera/ lenses etc to be wasted by saving $20 or $50 on a filter...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on June 21, 2015, 11:03:31 PM
I'm not sure I understand you're question, but I'll wait for Something Fishy to explain it properly :)
bekitzur, what you're losing (e.g. a lot of light -unless it's a very expensive filter) far outweighs whatever the gain is. (almost nothing IIRC)

On a side note, if you're serious about using the filters you probably want to throw these out and get decent ones. (I'm assuming this a cheap junk set.) You don't want hundreds or thousands spent on camera/ lenses etc to be wasted by saving $20 or $50 on a filter...
Thanks for your explanations. My kit was $39 - all 7 filters but ND. The ND was $60 for a ND2 to ND400
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 21, 2015, 11:11:35 PM
I'm not sure I understand you're question, but I'll wait for Something Fishy to explain it properly :)
bekitzur, what you're losing (e.g. a lot of light -unless it's a very expensive filter) far outweighs whatever the gain is. (almost nothing IIRC)

On a side note, if you're serious about using the filters you probably want to throw these out and get decent ones. (I'm assuming this a cheap junk set.) You don't want hundreds or thousands spent on camera/ lenses etc to be wasted by saving $20 or $50 on a filter...

Thanks for your explanations. My kit was $39 - all 7 filters but ND. The ND was $60 for a ND2 to ND400

WhYME said it very well. There's no way you're getting a decent filter at that price.

A typical cheap UV filter cuts around 9% of light and doesn't accomplish anything useful. It'll also attract more dirt than the lens itself, be harder to clean, and introduce reflections (known as "ghosting"). Either buy a good one ($100+) or get it off your lens...

Same goes for the others. A good CPL will simply do a better job at eliminating reflections etc., while losing less light. An FLD filter will wreak havoc with your auto white balance - don't use it, ever.

A vari-ND for $60 is cheap as well, but is not necessarily indicative of a bad filter.

Mind posting links to what you got?

ETA: I'm not trying to bash you here ;). It's just that from all our conversations I know that you're interested in getting more serious about your photography, so I'm being open.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on June 21, 2015, 11:28:54 PM
Firstly, this instant backup system gives me two copies, not three. Additionally, these will be clones of each other, so I won't have a couple of files in one place and a couple of files in the other. (This wasn't the case in Iceland, since from the time your laptop died we had to backup stuff on spare memory cards and on Chaiml's tablet. This left a bunch of files in different places and was absolutely not ideal. But normally I'd have one backup on a laptop and another on an external drive.)
I know, that's what I meant. I had a feeling when I wrote "saved in 3 places" there might be some confusion, but at the time I couldn't think of a better way to say it. (I should've said "3 copies")
About 2 vs 3 copies, so you delete the full memory cards right when they fill up and you copy them? you don't wait until you need it again? I can see advantages of either way.

Sorting and culling:
5. Get home and copy the files to the appropriate folders. Verify from both backup versions that everything's there.
How do you sort your pictures? These days I just use LR's default option of creating a folder for every day. I used to group them by trip/event etc. but I never really knew what to do with all the random pictures that didn't quite warrant folders of their own...

Erase:
16. Only once a few years have gone by do I start deleting remaining rejects and 1 stars. I also erase some original RAW files at that time, depending on the situation.
I seem to remember you saying at some point that you don't keep most of the RAW files, so that was talking about after a few years?


Now the big question is what about the gopro stuff? (http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji33.png)(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji33.png) That's where I'm really lost.

Thanks so much!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 21, 2015, 11:46:37 PM
About 2 vs 3 copies, so you delete the full memory cards right when they fill up and you copy them? you don't wait until you need it again? I can see advantages of either way.

Things have to be kept simple. While I'm out shooting I can't worry about a card if it was backed up or not, could I use it or not. With this system, if it's empty, it's available no questions asked.

How do you sort your pictures? These days I just use LR's default option of creating a folder for every day. I used to group them by trip/event etc. but I never really knew what to do with all the random pictures that didn't quite warrant folders of their own...

Simple folder hierarchy, kept in chronological order by using number prefixes (i.e. 01 - xxx, 02 - xxx). Split between personal and other (jobs, photography trips). Personal is kept organized by season and Yomim Tovim (01 - Winter 2014-1015, 02 - Purim 2015, 02 - Pesach 2015, 04 - Summer 2015, etc.). Each folder has additional chronological levels as needed for occasions, events, vacations, etc., as well as a Miscellaneous folder for whatever random stuff of that season.

I seem to remember you saying at some point that you don't keep most of the RAW files, so that was talking about after a few years?

I stopped doing that when Lightroom 5 came out and I saw what it could do to files I had given up on.

Now the big question is what about the gopro stuff? (http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji33.png)(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji33.png) That's where I'm really lost.

Theoretically? Same thing as with pictures. Place in correct folder, cull (both files and parts of videos themselves), edit, and file.

In practice ;D? Plop them in a folder and "take care of it later"...

Pictures are easy, and are handled at the same time as all other pictures. It's the videos which are a PITA to deal with. I'm making some headway, but it takes a tremendous amount of time. Writing trip reports help, as I need to go through everything to look for interesting screengrabs and clips. But at this time I'm terribly behind in my personal clips.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on June 22, 2015, 10:48:51 AM
WhYME said it very well. There's no way you're getting a decent filter at that price.

A typical cheap UV filter cuts around 9% of light and doesn't accomplish anything useful. It'll also attract more dirt than the lens itself, be harder to clean, and introduce reflections (known as "ghosting"). Either buy a good one ($100+) or get it off your lens...

Same goes for the others. A good CPL will simply do a better job at eliminating reflections etc., while losing less light. An FLD filter will wreak havoc with your auto white balance - don't use it, ever.

A vari-ND for $60 is cheap as well, but is not necessarily indicative of a bad filter.

Mind posting links to what you got?

ETA: I'm not trying to bash you here ;). It's just that from all our conversations I know that you're interested in getting more serious about your photography, so I'm being open.
Thanks!

I am not bashed but surprised... Didn't know what i am getting mysellf into when buying my first mirrorless and slr...

Here are some of what i bought, i can not find 1 more ND that i bought.

http://www.amazon.com/Polaroid-Premium-Package-Wonderland-Multi-Coated/dp/B00864XPGI/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1434984187&sr=8-5&keywords=40.5mm+nd+400

http://www.amazon.com/Concept-Variable-Adjustable-Microfiber-Cleaning/dp/B00N3N6GT0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1434984242&sr=8-2&keywords=40.5mm+nd+400

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00HVWPJME?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00

From my understanding, i can feturn all filters but the ND  ::)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 22, 2015, 01:27:02 PM
Yeah, these are terrible filters (and other than the CP and ND, useless).
Title: Just for fun – can you tell which camera?
Post by: Toasted on June 24, 2015, 12:40:56 PM
http://www.digitalphotomentor.com/is-the-camera-an-important-factor-when-you-choose-a-new-smartphone/?utm_source=Digital+Photo+Mentor&utm_campaign=ea6cacbdac-DPM_Blog_Broadcast&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_ec33f1d0c3-ea6cacbdac-262807245&mc_cid=ea6cacbdac&mc_eid=b17061962e

Anyone care to share their picks? I'm too busy to guess all, but I'll guess that 1 and 4 are withe 5d.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Dan on June 28, 2015, 10:03:10 PM
SF, have you shot with this thing?
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/29/nyregion/an-intimate-view-of-new-york-through-a-1200-millimeter-lens.html
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on June 28, 2015, 10:15:59 PM
SF, have you shot with this thing?
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/06/29/nyregion/an-intimate-view-of-new-york-through-a-1200-millimeter-lens.html

Nope, haven't had a chance yet. Didn't want to end up like this guy ;):

(http://photorumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Canon-EF-1200mm-f5.6-L-USM-lens-review.jpg)

Also, it's a Canon. Icky :P
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: nathan13 on June 28, 2015, 10:19:14 PM
I'm looking to take a photography course in the local NYC (boropark) area. I'm not looking to become a professional photographer just as a hobby. I Do know some very basics and i have the T3i (outdated by now but still does the job). I would prefer for it to be a live course not online. If anybody has any suggestions please let me know.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Sam Finkelstein on June 28, 2015, 10:21:13 PM
Nope, haven't had a chance yet. Didn't want to end up like this guy ;):

(http://photorumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Canon-EF-1200mm-f5.6-L-USM-lens-review.jpg)

Also, it's a Canon. Icky :P

What's wrong with Canon?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: nathan13 on July 01, 2015, 11:48:49 AM
I'm looking to take a photography course in the local NYC (boropark) area. I'm not looking to become a professional photographer just as a hobby. I Do know some very basics and i have the T3i (outdated by now but still does the job). I would prefer for it to be a live course not online. If anybody has any suggestions please let me know.
Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: AJK on July 07, 2015, 07:27:46 PM
Firstly, this instant backup system gives me two copies, not three. Additionally, these will be clones of each other, so I won't have a couple of files in one place and a couple of files in the other. (This wasn't the case in Iceland, since from the time your laptop died we had to backup stuff on spare memory cards and on Chaiml's tablet. This left a bunch of files in different places and was absolutely not ideal. But normally I'd have one backup on a laptop and another on an external drive.)

So the workflow is something like this:

On-location backup:
1. Copy card to laptop.
2. Copy card to external drive.
3. Verify both copies by attempting to copy again and making sure everything triggers a "file already exists" error (very low-tech, but it does the job nicely).
4. Format memory card in camera to be ready for use again.

Sorting and culling:
5. Get home and copy the files to the appropriate folders. Verify from both backup versions that everything's there.
6. Import everything into Lightroom.
7. Start sorting and culling the files using flags, stars, and color tags. Obvious garbage (out of focus, mistaken pictures, etc.) get flagged as rejected. Bad pictures get 1 star, meh pictures get 2, and good ones get 3. A series of pictures that needs more intensive sorting (bracketed sequences, high-burst sequences, etc.) get the red label.
8. Do this process again. Most 1 stars get rejected. 2 stars move to either 1 or 3. Red gets either 1 or 3; bracketed sequences which need to be HDR tonemapped remain red.
9. Erase the worst of the rejects. A picture so out of focus you can't tell what the subject is, so blurry it's just strips, etc. Series outtakes sometimes also get erased at this point.

Editing:
10. 3 stars get edited in Lightroom's Develop module. If done, they get 5 stars. If they need further work in Photoshop, they get 4. HDRs get tonemapped and either 4 or 5 stars.
11. 4 stars move to Photoshop and get finished. Back to Lightroom where they get 5 stars.

Output:
12. 5 stars get different color labels depending on output (save to computer, Flickr, email, printing, photobook, etc.). If a single picture needs more than one color it gets virtual copies, each with the appropriate color tag.
13. One by one a color is selected and exported as needed.

Redo:
14. 3-6 months later, redo step 7. Chances are you'll find a hidden gem in the reject or 1 star pile, and not really like some previous favorites. Once you're a bit removed from when you took the picture, you're looking at things more objectively. You don't quite feel the emotions you felt while taking the photo, so you see things differently.
15. A year or two later, do this again. The advantage of this is that software is getting so much better, that some pictures that were rejected right away may now be salvageable. For example, a picture taken two years ago that was so underexposed it was completely black, could be easily fixed these days.

Erase:
16. Only once a few years have gone by do I start deleting remaining rejects and 1 stars. I also erase some original RAW files at that time, depending on the situation.

Wow. Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SLP on July 09, 2015, 09:42:09 PM
I'm looking to take a photography course in the local NYC (boropark) area. I'm not looking to become a professional photographer just as a hobby. I Do know some very basics and i have the T3i (outdated by now but still does the job). I would prefer for it to be a live course not online. If anybody has any suggestions please let me know.
Thanks.
I took a course at Photouno in the city and it was excellent.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on July 10, 2015, 01:13:16 AM
Nope, haven't had a chance yet. Didn't want to end up like this guy ;):

(http://photorumors.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Canon-EF-1200mm-f5.6-L-USM-lens-review.jpg)

Also, it's a Canon. Icky :P
Which one? The guy to the right or the left?  ;)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: nathan13 on July 10, 2015, 01:20:27 AM
I took a course at Photouno in the city and it was excellent.

We're u a noob in photography? Did u do from staters?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: SLP on July 10, 2015, 02:34:44 AM
We're u a noob in photography? Did u do from staters?
Yes, I'm still a noob, only started a few months ago! I had done a lot of reading on my own but also wanted something live as opposed to just online.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on July 10, 2015, 03:24:55 PM
Playing around with Aperture Mode today. Feedback?

(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/07/10/8141c9b27989e3de146b0b8f8c7c6c73.jpg)

(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/07/10/7754a205633626e73ebb85e1273a876b.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on July 13, 2015, 01:14:39 AM
So I was reading some phone reviews and came across this:
Quote
Most phones are over 2.0 with the f-stop, which is the speed of the sensor and how well it captures details and light.
(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji53.png)


Let's hope the rest of the review is more accurate...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 13, 2015, 07:50:16 AM
ALOL
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on July 13, 2015, 02:27:25 PM
@SF, your thoughts on these two pics?

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3777/19046185023_c0e34f60ac_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v23Ffp)

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3690/19477743728_f76c9e753e_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/vFbwBJ)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on July 13, 2015, 02:44:55 PM
@SF, your thoughts on these two pics?

im not sf, but the second one is great
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on July 13, 2015, 03:01:32 PM
im not sf, but the second one is great
+1
The first one would have ended up nicer had it been shot from a tripod.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Sam Finkelstein on July 13, 2015, 08:26:53 PM
@SF, your thoughts on these two pics?

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3777/19046185023_c0e34f60ac_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v23Ffp)

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3690/19477743728_f76c9e753e_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/vFbwBJ)

Beautiful scenery! May I ask where this was taken?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on July 13, 2015, 08:30:03 PM

Beautiful scenery! May I ask where this was taken?

Banff?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Sam Finkelstein on July 13, 2015, 08:33:52 PM
Banff?

Makes sense. Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: TimT on July 13, 2015, 08:35:33 PM
Moraigne lake
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on July 13, 2015, 09:19:50 PM
Wow! You should totally write a book!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Ergel on July 13, 2015, 11:16:24 PM
Moraigne lake
Correct. My TR http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=53540.0
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2015, 01:43:00 AM
@SF, your thoughts on these two pics?

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3777/19046185023_c0e34f60ac_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v23Ffp)

Fantastic shot. A perfect example of capturing the moment; you've made a great image in hard conditions. The light is flat and boring, and focus missed the mountain goat and hit the background instead. Even so, the picture is extremely compelling. There's great movement (the goat's in mid leap), as well as tension (How high is he? Will he jump? Is there a cliff on the other side?). The background has a million interesting details to explore, making it a very interesting scene. The more I look at it the more details I discover - my eye goes from the initial "wow - look at that goat!" to more intricate details and observations.

Do I wish the light was perfect, that the focus was perfect? Sure. But even so, it's a fantastic picture.

(https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3690/19477743728_f76c9e753e_b.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/vFbwBJ)

This one, on the other hand ;)...

Here's the deal: Banff is on my Top 10 to do list because of this exact scene (and one other as well). Problem is, this being a purely scenic picture (as opposed to the action shot above), I do have a problem with the light and composition. Now don't get me wrong - it's still a very nice picture. But I personally have been spoiled by seeing this scene shot in perfect light, and with a perfect composition, so seeing it in less than ideal situations just doesn't do it for me.

What do I mean by that?

For starters, light. Light is the most important part of any photograph (yes, even more important that the subject - good light can make even the most mundane look amazing). There's only one time to shoot Moraine Lake and get sweet light, and that's in the 15 minutes or so before and after sunrise (preferably in the dead of winter, but that's going into crazy territory  ;D). Outside of that window, the light gets harsh, the air gets hazy, and the brilliance of color is lost, like in your picture. During sunrise, the air is still and clear, and the mountaintops light up with alpenglow. The contrast of the bright canoe colors stand out wonderfully against the neutral colors of the mountains.

2 - Reflections. Another advantage of shooting at sunrise is that the lake will generally be completely still. That means that there will be a perfect reflection of both the mountains and canoes, all juxtaposed over the dark blue waters. The ripples in your picture are pretty, but rob the image of the sense of total tranquility one would expect considering no people in the frame and all the boats tied up.

3 - Composition. When shooting grand landscapes such as this, an interesting foreground element is crucial. In this picture, that would be the canoes. However, observe how small a portion the canoes occupy in the image! The lake itself, while very pretty, is really just a large expanse of plain blue. The same lake could be suggested by greatly reducing the amount shown, and occupying the space with the more visually-interesting canoes. If you had moved a bit to the right, a bit lower, and a bit closer (dunno if the last part was at all possible without falling in the water), you would have put much more emphasis on the canoes and you would've gotten a more interesting picture. I also find the rocks and log on the lower right-hand side distracting and wish they didn't keep on pulling my eyes away from the canoes.

Now I'm not saying that you should have gotten up at zero-dark-thirty while on a family vacation to shoot one picture; I'm merely explaining the difference between a snapshot (and a very pretty one at that) and a thought-out scenic image.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2015, 01:46:02 AM
This picture is a pretty good example of all three points - note the lovely light, the clarity of the air, the stillness of the water, and the prominence of the canoes:

(http://i0.wp.com/www.colorsandjoy.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/12/Sunrise-on-Moraine-Lake.jpg)

This one is taken in bad light late in the day, but note the composition:

https://fortunatelylovinglife.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/img_1916.jpg (it won't embed properly)

Lastly, here's a totally different take on the same scene which I found very interesting (source (http://mattkloskowski.squarespace.com/1ed6z06xcz69n5ccnqd9o36mkenm9s)):

(http://static1.squarespace.com/static/5080546ae4b01ec8523deda4/5080546ae4b01ec8523dedaa/50e0eaeee4b0c2f4976a6e16/1356917488182/banffboats.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on July 14, 2015, 01:58:00 AM
This one, on the other hand ;) ...

Here's the deal: Banff is on my Top 10 to do list because of this exact scene (and one other as well). Problem is, this being a purely scenic picture (as opposed to the action shot above), I do have a problem with the light and composition. Now don't get me wrong - it's still a very nice picture. But I personally have been spoiled by seeing this scene shot in perfect light, and with a perfect composition, so seeing it in less than ideal situations just doesn't do it for me.

What do I mean by that?

For starters, light. Light is the most important part of any photograph (yes, even more important that the subject - good light can make even the most mundane look amazing). There's only one time to shoot Moraine Lake and get sweet light, and that's in the 15 minutes or so before and after sunrise (preferably in the dead of winter, but that's going into crazy territory  ;D ). Outside of that window, the light gets harsh, the air gets hazy, and the brilliance of color is lost, like in your picture. During sunrise, the air is still and clear, and the mountaintops light up with alpenglow. The contrast of the bright canoe colors stand out wonderfully against the neutral colors of the mountains.

2 - Reflections. Another advantage of shooting at sunrise is that the lake will generally be completely still. That means that there will be a perfect reflection of both the mountains and canoes, all juxtaposed over the dark blue waters. The ripples in your picture are pretty, but rob the image of the sense of total tranquility one would expect considering no people in the frame and all the boats tied up.

3 - Composition. When shooting grand landscapes such as this, an interesting foreground element is crucial. In this picture, that would be the canoes. However, observe how small a portion the canoes occupy in the image! The lake itself, while very pretty, is really just a large expanse of plain blue. The same lake could be suggested by greatly reducing the amount shown, and occupying the space with the more visually-interesting canoes. If you had moved a bit to the right, a bit lower, and a bit closer (dunno if the last part was at all possible without falling in the water), you would have put much more emphasis on the canoes and you would've gotten a more interesting picture. I also find the rocks and log on the lower right-hand side distracting and wish they didn't keep on pulling my eyes away from the canoes.

Now I'm not saying that you should have gotten up at zero-dark-thirty while on a family vacation to shoot one picture; I'm merely explaining the difference between a snapshot (and a very pretty one at that) and a thought-out scenic image.
And this is why SF is the master.
I was gonna say "Nice picture but it needs more color / better light and the canoes should've been given more prominence," but i think SF explained it a little bit better  (http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji1.png)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: EJB on July 14, 2015, 05:38:57 AM
Debating between a good APS-C and an ok full frame DSLR. What would you guys recommend? I'm currently debating between the D750 and D7200. I am flexible to wait for sales. <$2k budget.

I already have a NEX-6, so portability/small size is nice, but not required.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: good sam on July 14, 2015, 06:48:28 AM
This is slowly becoming my favorite thread
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on July 14, 2015, 07:53:59 AM
Wild parakeet in my back garden. Looking for critique on the crop here.


Cropped:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/424/19064004834_12f37d75ef_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v3C1sw)

edit: Ignore the white dot in the middle...

Original unedited:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/498/19065672303_30f22e8c33_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v3Ly8Z)

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2015, 10:06:19 AM
Wild parakeet in my back garden. Looking for critique on the crop here.


Cropped:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/424/19064004834_12f37d75ef_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v3C1sw)

edit: Ignore the white dot in the middle...

Original unedited:
(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/498/19065672303_30f22e8c33_z.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/v3Ly8Z)

Very nice crop. Great use of negative space in the direction the head is turned, give the composition breathing room.

That appears to be a Quaker parrot, BTW.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on July 14, 2015, 10:22:59 AM
Very nice crop. Great use of negative space in the direction the head is turned, give the composition breathing room.

Thanks for the feedback.

That appears to be a Quaker parrot, BTW.

Potato, potahto... Seems to be one and the same.

http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/exotic-birds-living-wild-in-london-the-feral-london-parrots.html (http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/exotic-birds-living-wild-in-london-the-feral-london-parrots.html)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on July 14, 2015, 10:29:15 AM

There's only one time to shoot Moraine Lake and get sweet light, and that's in the 15 minutes or so before and after sunrise (preferably in the dead of winter, but that's going into crazy territory  ;D). Outside of that window, the light gets harsh, the air gets hazy, and the brilliance of color is lost, like in your picture. During sunrise, the air is still and clear, and the mountaintops light up with alpenglow. The contrast of the bright canoe colors stand out wonderfully against the neutral colors of the mountains.
is this a general rule or is it specific to this location?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2015, 10:40:04 AM
Thanks for the feedback.

Potato, potahto... Seems to be one and the same.

http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/exotic-birds-living-wild-in-london-the-feral-london-parrots.html (http://www.pets4homes.co.uk/pet-advice/exotic-birds-living-wild-in-london-the-feral-london-parrots.html)

Wasn't disagreeing; I was just pointing out the exact species in case you were interested (my in-laws have a Quaker).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 14, 2015, 10:42:18 AM
is this a general rule or is it specific to this location?

Seems it's about time I wrote up a new lesson... Coming up shortly: Light for Landscape Photography.

Hope to have it done this week.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on July 14, 2015, 10:53:26 AM
Wow, I'm really looking forward to it!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yehuda57 on July 14, 2015, 10:57:00 AM


You've been Best Ofed (http://forums.dansdeals.com/index.php?topic=53386.msg1204920#msg1204920) again. Incredible stuff. Thanks for taking the time to write these up.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on July 14, 2015, 01:01:34 PM
Seems it's about time I wrote up a new lesson... Coming up shortly: Light for Landscape Photography.

Hope to have it done this week.
Thumbs up! Have been eagerly waiting around for this.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: tageed-lee on July 14, 2015, 01:32:08 PM
Seems it's about time I wrote up a new lesson... Coming up shortly: Light for Landscape Photography.

Hope to have it done this week.

Nice! Looking forward! Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on July 14, 2015, 10:04:34 PM
Seems it's about time I wrote up a new lesson... Coming up shortly: Light for Landscape Photography.

Hope to have it done this week.
Just in time for my trip to St John!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: @Yehuda on July 16, 2015, 10:38:35 AM
I don't have access to digital copies of my wedding photos, but, the photographer did make the pictures that are actually in our album available for me to view online before the album went to print.
#1 How do I find out if the quality of those pics is good enough to print on my own (ex. to make an enlargement, print on a canvas, etc.)?
#2 Is there a way to remove the photographer's watermark?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 16, 2015, 10:42:24 AM
I don't have access to digital copies of my wedding photos, but, the photographer did make the pictures that are actually in our album available for me to view online before the album went to print.
#1 How do I find out if the quality of those pics is good enough to print on my own (ex. to make an enlargement, print on a canvas, etc.)?
#2 Is there a way to remove the photographer's watermark?

#1: Right click on the picture to get the info, and check the dimensions. Devide each number by 300, and the result will be the number of inches that will look good in print.

#2: Yes, pay him for his work.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: @Yehuda on July 16, 2015, 11:29:27 AM
#1: Right click on the picture to get the info, and check the dimensions. Devide each number by 300, and the result will be the number of inches that will look good in print.

#2: Yes, pay him for his work.
#1 Didn't work. His program doesn't let you right click.
#2 I understand that, of course. :) We paid for physical proofs because the parents said it'll be easier to browse through and piece together the album. I'd think that physical proofs cost more than sharing a digital copy of all proofs. Was a bit surprised that digital copies weren't included in the cost of the whole job. Thanks for the information. After we get the enlarged photos that we're entitled to, we can always pay for additional ones, or perhaps the rights to the digital copies of specific photos.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on July 16, 2015, 11:37:37 AM
#1 Didn't work. His program doesn't let you right click.
#2 I understand that, of course. :) We paid for physical proofs because the parents said it'll be easier to browse through and piece together the album. I'd think that physical proofs cost more than sharing a digital copy of all proofs. Was a bit surprised that digital copies weren't included in the cost of the whole job. Thanks for the information. After we get the enlarged photos that we're entitled to, we can always pay for additional ones, or perhaps the rights to the digital copies of specific photos.

#1: Smart man ;D
#2: No photographer worth his salt will give you high-res digital copies. A photographer's profit comes more from prints than anything else.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on July 16, 2015, 11:47:52 AM
#1: Smart man ;D
If you View Source of the page maybe you can find the link to the actual file
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: wayfe on July 16, 2015, 03:07:18 PM
#2: No photographer worth his salt will give you high-res digital copies. A photographer's profit comes more from prints than anything else.

This is what I hate most about the photography business. What I'd like to be paid for is my time, vision, creativity- not absurd prices for an 8x10 print!

I don't know how any photographer can justify charging $100 for a 5x7 print of your photoshoot.

Especially in the digital age.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on July 16, 2015, 05:46:41 PM
This is what I hate most about the photography business. What I'd like to be paid for is my time, vision, creativity- not absurd prices for an 8x10 print!

I don't know how any photographer can justify charging $100 for a 5x7 print of your photoshoot.

Especially in the digital age.
That's where they make their money. It's not a justify thing in a free market.

Would you rather pay 400 dollars for a photo shoot or 100 dollars and then get to choose along the way which pictures you want? This way your initial investment is low and you only spend more if you are actually happy with the product. I'm not a professional photographer btw.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: pixi on July 21, 2015, 12:09:48 PM
Any way I can print a 4x6 ( or any other size)  print without picture being cropped around but it should be borderless ?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on July 26, 2015, 09:20:02 AM
Any way I can print a 4x6 ( or any other size)  print without picture being cropped around but it should be borderless ?
Make sure your camera captures on a 2x3 ratio.  That way you will not need to crop.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on July 28, 2015, 12:31:30 AM
This was one of the most technically difficult pictures I ever took
(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji101.png)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on July 29, 2015, 08:56:33 PM
I just got my Panasonic LX7, and from the first picture I took from my couch I love it!

Do you recommend this book? http://www.amazon.com/Photographers-Guide-Panasonic-Lumix-LX7-ebook/dp/B00BCRL9T6#reader_B00BCRL9T6

(I'm a beginner at taking pictures with anything than a standard P&S.)

Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on August 02, 2015, 04:35:36 PM
I'm doing now a 30 minute exposure to shoot stars (at night). But then saw it is way too bright (with ISO 200). Should I use a ND filter or is there a different trick? I can't waist 30 minutes to try out each option...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 02, 2015, 06:19:06 PM
I'm doing now a 30 minute exposure to shoot stars (at night). But then saw it is way too bright (with ISO 200). Should I use a ND filter or is there a different trick? I can't waist 30 minutes to try out each option...

1. Why are you doing 30 minutes? If it's too bright a far shorter exposure is in order. Is it because you're trying to get star trails? These are generally done by taking many short exposures and stacking them (a technique called, oddly enough, exposure stacking ;)).

2. No, an ND filter won't help. It won't be bright anymore, but you won't see the stars either.

3. No need to waste time trying out things. A bit of simple math is all you need. Say your current exposure is 30 minutes, f/2.8, and ISO 200. Increase your ISO by five stops to 6400, and your shutter speed could drop to 1 minute and you'll get the same results. Of course the picture will be terrible quality due to all the noise, but it's perfect for figuring out your exposure.

So your next step should be to try ISO 6400 and 30 seconds. This would be the same as going to 15 minutes at ISO 200.

There are lots of apps out there that will do this math for you, but for now here's the rundown, showing the doubling of ISO and the corresponding halving of shutter speed:

1. ISO 200 @ 30 minutes
2. 400 @ 15
3. 800 @ 8
4. 1600 @ 4
5. 3200 @ 2
6. ISO 6400 @ 1 minute.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on August 03, 2015, 03:10:08 AM
1. Why are you doing 30 minutes? If it's too bright a far shorter exposure is in order. Is it because you're trying to get star trails? These are generally done by taking many short exposures and stacking them (a technique called, oddly enough, exposure stacking ;)).

2. No, an ND filter won't help. It won't be bright anymore, but you won't see the stars either.

3. No need to waste time trying out things. A bit of simple math is all you need. Say your current exposure is 30 minutes, f/2.8, and ISO 200. Increase your ISO by five stops to 6400, and your shutter speed could drop to 1 minute and you'll get the same results. Of course the picture will be terrible quality due to all the noise, but it's perfect for figuring out your exposure.

So your next step should be to try ISO 6400 and 30 seconds. This would be the same as going to 15 minutes at ISO 200.

There are lots of apps out there that will do this math for you, but for now here's the rundown, showing the doubling of ISO and the corresponding halving of shutter speed:

1. ISO 200 @ 30 minutes
2. 400 @ 15
3. 800 @ 8
4. 1600 @ 4
5. 3200 @ 2
6. ISO 6400 @ 1 minute.
Thanks. But I tried capturing how the stars move,  a faster shutter speed wouldn't do that. Anyway I realized later that the reason it was overexposed was due to a street light in the distance. I will try again tonight on a pitch dark mountain... I hope I will overcome my fear...

Are you saying that to get the star trails I should not do a 30 minute expo? Or that I can 'also' blend a few pictures? Thanks in advance!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 03, 2015, 07:47:54 AM
Thanks. But I tried capturing how the stars move,  a faster shutter speed wouldn't do that. Anyway I realized later that the reason it was overexposed was due to a street light in the distance. I will try again tonight on a pitch dark mountain... I hope I will overcome my fear...

Are you saying that to get the star trails I should not do a 30 minute expo? Or that I can 'also' blend a few pictures? Thanks in advance!!

You shoot many continuous pictures then combine them later. Use an intervalometer if your have one.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: smurf on August 03, 2015, 09:30:42 AM
Awesome! Looks like it's fixed, then.

Turns out the pictures were in the Adobe RGB color space, which doesn't play nice with mobile. Converted them to the sRGB space and that seemed to do the trick.
d f2f c


On my phone now and the 2nd one looks the same as the 1st one on my computer.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: smurf on August 03, 2015, 09:30:42 AM
Awesome! Looks like it's fixed, then.

Turns out the pictures were in the Adobe RGB color space, which doesn't play nice with mobile. Converted them to the sRGB space and that seemed to do the trick.
d f2f c


On my phone now and the 2nd one looks the same as the 1st one on my computer.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: smurf on August 03, 2015, 09:31:06 AM
Oy, that's a new twist :D.

What device are you seeing it on?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on August 03, 2015, 03:51:28 PM
You shoot many continuous pictures then combine them later. Use an intervalometer if your have one.
Wow. Coming out really nice, Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 03, 2015, 03:52:23 PM
Wow. Coming out really nice, Thanks!

:D

Post some!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 04, 2015, 06:41:04 AM
Just read about magic Lantern for Canon. Good pickup for my t3i?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 04, 2015, 08:04:23 AM
Just read about magic Lantern for Canon. Good pickup for my t3i?

ML is more pro-video centric. You may want to consider CHDK instead.

That being said both are awesome additions to your camera. If only things like this were available for my Nikon...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 04, 2015, 08:09:29 AM
ML is more pro-video centric. You may want to consider CHDK instead.

That being said both are awesome additions to your camera. If only things like this were available for my Nikon...
Thanks!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on August 04, 2015, 09:00:06 AM
:D

Post some!
I have very slow connection here. I will post some when i return home BL"N
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on August 05, 2015, 02:04:17 PM
I have a canon s110. Recently the screen jot damaged (possibly from water) and looks full of splotches when turned on.This causes me to be unable to tell what the true lighting is since it's different on every part of the screen. Any ideas? thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 05, 2015, 02:13:10 PM
I have a canon s110. Recently the screen jot damaged (possibly from water) and looks full of splotches when turned on.This causes me to be unable to tell what the true lighting is since it's different on every part of the screen. Any ideas? thanks

Get it fixed, basically.

Learning how to use the histogram will allow you to check the exposure as well.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Little Bob on August 05, 2015, 07:41:12 PM
Any recommendations where to get it fixed in the ny nj area?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on August 05, 2015, 11:15:24 PM
Any recommendations where to get it fixed in the ny nj area?
depending how much it costs to fix, you may be better off getting a new one through the canon loyalty program. 866-443-8002
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 06, 2015, 12:18:15 AM
Any recommendations where to get it fixed in the ny nj area?

[ur=https://www.chryslercamera.com/]Chrysler Camera Repair[/url]

But realistically,

you may be better off getting a new one through the canon loyalty program. 866-443-8002
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on August 06, 2015, 12:43:13 AM
Chrysler Camera Repair (https://www.chryslercamera.com/)

But realistically,

FTFY (The Link)

Great repair place. Came all the way just from Chicago to get my camera fixed there.  ;D ;D

Thanks SF
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DanH on August 06, 2015, 12:45:36 AM
This may not be the right place for this, so I'm sorry in advance.  Which computer monitor (24" or larger) would you guys recommend?  Up to $300 - $350.  Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on August 06, 2015, 12:47:52 AM
This may not be the right place for this, so I'm sorry in advance.  Which computer monitor (24" or larger) would you guys recommend?  Up to $300 - $350.  Thanks

To view photos specifically?

OR for you any reason?

If the latter, wrong place.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DanH on August 06, 2015, 12:54:38 AM
To view photos specifically?

OR for you any reason?

If the latter, wrong place.
For photography.  Viewing and editing high-res images.  (Also that viewing angles dont effect image - if possible)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 06, 2015, 12:58:00 AM
For photography.  Viewing and editing high-res images.  (Also that viewing angles dont effect image - if possible)

Unless you're doing critical color work (for matched printing and the like) any regular good monitor will do. Personally I use nothing fancy - just a random HP (cost around $150 five years ago IIRC).

I do use a Spyder Pro (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1130968-REG/datacolor_s5p100_spyder5pro_downloadable_software.html) to calibrate it, so I know WISIWYG.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: DanH on August 06, 2015, 01:07:43 AM
Unless you're doing critical color work (for matched printing and the like) any regular good monitor will do. Personally I use nothing fancy - just a random HP (cost around $150 five years ago IIRC).

I do use a Spyder Pro (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1130968-REG/datacolor_s5p100_spyder5pro_downloadable_software.html) to calibrate it, so I know WISIWYG.
Thanks for the quick response.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on August 06, 2015, 01:07:49 AM
Unless you're doing critical color work (for matched printing and the like) any regular good monitor will do. Personally I use nothing fancy - just a random HP (cost around $150 five years ago IIRC).

I do use a Spyder Pro (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1130968-REG/datacolor_s5p100_spyder5pro_downloadable_software.html) to calibrate it, so I know WISIWYG.

With all these things you claim to use, I am getting interested to see your dark room. Surely you must have one.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 06, 2015, 01:09:28 AM
With all these things you claim to use, I am getting interested to see your dark room. Surely you must have one.

I do have a dark room. But unfortunately, instead of being in bed there now, I'm on DDF instead >:(.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: chucksterace on August 06, 2015, 01:15:59 AM
I do have a dark room. But unfortunately, instead of being in bed there now, I'm on DDF instead >:(.

Lol. I see what you did there..  ::)

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 11, 2015, 06:19:47 PM
For the heck of it. I thought the clouds in the background and overhead with the sun shining made for a nice shot.
From my office on my g4.

(https://flic.kr/p/wWHx3U)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 11, 2015, 06:37:23 PM
For the heck of it. I thought the clouds in the background and overhead with the sun shining made for a nice shot.
From my office on my g4.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/506/20309897868_9bb2ed9d85_k.jpg)
FTFY

([ img ]https://farm1.staticflickr.com/506/20309897868_9bb2ed9d85_k.jpg[/img])
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 11, 2015, 06:40:57 PM
Or better yet:
For the heck of it. I thought the clouds in the background and overhead with the sun shining made for a nice shot.
From my office on my g4.

(https://farm1.staticflickr.com/506/20309897868_d7f27c013d_h.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 11, 2015, 06:43:14 PM
And just FTR, I can't really tell if it's a good picture because I look at it and all I see are those two cranes. (http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji16.png)(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji16.png)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 11, 2015, 07:04:26 PM
Very nice shot. Nothing like storm light.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 11, 2015, 07:18:57 PM
Or better yet:
Thanks
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: askmoses on August 13, 2015, 07:55:00 PM
One of the free Amazon apps. "Elements of Photography Pro" http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00D5XYY4M/ref=s9_acsd_bw_wf_a_masfad_cdl_11?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=merchandised-search-4&pf_rd_r=1G161YW7CSWSCFZP0H9E&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=2164690722&pf_rd_i=10076151011

Thoughts?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on August 13, 2015, 10:56:17 PM
I downloaded it, it has lots of information for beginners, and really neat diagrams etc.

But it seems a bit biased toward "old school" (not necessarily an issue, just be aware of it)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 25, 2015, 11:49:22 PM
On-location backup:
1. Copy card to laptop.
2. Copy card to external drive.
3. Verify both copies by attempting to copy again and making sure everything triggers a "file already exists" error (very low-tech, but it does the job nicely).
Could you repeat that again? I'm not sure I quite heard right.
(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji13.png)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 26, 2015, 12:01:53 AM
Could you repeat that again? I'm not sure I quite heard right.
(http://s3.amazonaws.com/tapatalk-emoji/emoji13.png)

Oh be quiet ;D.

Let me clarify my method going forward:

On-location backup:
1. Copy card to working laptop. Do NOT rely on whYME, as his laptops have now failed in the field twice, thereby screwing everyone.
2. Copy card to external drive.
3. Verify both copies by attempting to copy again and making sure everything triggers a "file already exists" error (very low-tech, but it does the job nicely).
4. Format memory card in camera to be ready for use again.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 26, 2015, 12:08:07 AM
Oh, I think it was this part that I needed repeated :P
2. Copy card to external drive.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on August 26, 2015, 12:09:25 AM
....
wow - nice!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 26, 2015, 12:11:08 AM
Oh, I think it was this part that I needed repeated :P

Uh oh. CatInTheHat doesn't have it either?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on August 26, 2015, 12:13:16 AM
Uh oh. CatInTheHat doesn't have it either?
Still waiting to hear from him
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on August 26, 2015, 12:52:01 AM
Cuban cars!!!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on August 26, 2015, 06:59:52 AM


On-location backup:
Do NOT rely on whYME, as his laptops have now failed in the field twice, thereby screwing everyone.

That'll teach you to plan these things on dates that actually work for me...



Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ChAiM'l on August 29, 2015, 06:32:55 PM
Cool idea...

Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on August 30, 2015, 01:14:25 PM
Cool idea...


Missing one thing... A place to put the cover from the sensor...  :P
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on August 30, 2015, 01:30:09 PM
Missing one thing... A place to put the cover from the sensor...  :P
theres usually a lens on the camera unless i dont understand your question
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on August 30, 2015, 01:36:15 PM
theres usually a lens on the camera unless i dont understand your question
I think you understood me right, but if you want to keep the camera as compact as possible you'd remove the lens, no?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 30, 2015, 02:21:35 PM
I think you understood me right, but if you want to keep the camera as compact as possible you'd remove the lens, no?

Huh? Why would you do that?

What's the point of a camera without the lens?

And as an aside, if this could accept lenses it could accept the body cap by default as well.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on August 30, 2015, 02:40:40 PM
Huh? Why would you do that?

What's the point of a camera without the lens?
Depends on how your carry case is set up and if it accommodates while the lens is a attached or detached.
And as an aside, if this could accept lenses it could accept the body cap by default as well.
:( I didn't think about that.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: moish on August 30, 2015, 02:50:44 PM
lens always on camera. gotta be ready to go in a moments notice
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on August 30, 2015, 02:58:02 PM
Depends on how your carry case is set up and if it accommodates while the lens is a attached or detached. :(

If your case can't hold your camera with the lens mounted then methinks it's time for a new case...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: shlonx on September 01, 2015, 09:24:50 PM
Can anyone help me with this?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/p19zl9mr2dhdpp3/taxi.wmv?dl=0

I took this video with a Canon G16 (nothing major, I know), and the sky colour really irks me. I especially raised the lens to get the blue hue, but then just lost it on the way back down. I'm bichlal not a maven, so the issue could be a basic one, but I really want to know what the cause is and how to avoid it in the future...

Thanks in advance...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on September 01, 2015, 09:43:55 PM


I'm bichlal not a maven, so the issue could be a basic one, but I really want to know what the cause is and how to avoid it in the future...

It seems to me to be a basic issue, that your camera does not have enough dynamic range to keep the sky and buildings exposed at the same time.

Look at 0:04, you can see that the sky is exposed relatively well, as are the sunlit buildings. But the shadows (look in the lower right corner) are far too dark.

As you bring the camera down, these shadowed buildings take up more of the frame, so the camera tries to a raise the overall brightness to expose them correctly.

By the time you get to 0:06, the buildings are exposed correctly, but the sky is so much brighter, so it gets washed out.

Hope this helps!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 01, 2015, 10:29:53 PM

It seems to me to be a basic issue, that your camera does not have enough dynamic range to keep the sky and buildings exposed at the same time.

Look at 0:04, you can see that the sky is exposed relatively well, as are the sunlit buildings. But the shadows (look in the lower right corner) are far too dark.

As you bring the camera down, these shadowed buildings take up more of the frame, so the camera tries to a raise the overall brightness to expose them correctly.

By the time you get to 0:06, the buildings are exposed correctly, but the sky is so much brighter, so it gets washed out.

Hope this helps!

Right on the money.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: shlonx on September 01, 2015, 11:17:18 PM
I see, thanks!

I'm reading a bit about it, and it seems that most of the basic solutions (flash etc.) are only for images. I guess videos are a whole different ballgame. Oh, well...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on September 01, 2015, 11:59:21 PM
I see, thanks!

So is it a setting I have to change, or can the camera just not handle the pressure?
For video, it is very hard to do with low end camera. For a scene like this you would need to be able to control the exposure manually while recording video, and try (I think) to set it to retain just a little blue of the sky, and the shadows will be a bit too dark but not totally black.

Then in your editing application you can try to recover those highlights and shadows to look good.

But IDK if your camera records at a high enough quality to recover it without the image quality falling apart...

If someone here with more video experience can chip in, I'd appreciate it.

As for photography, I think SF may have covered this already.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on September 03, 2015, 08:30:47 AM
My wife took these on her g4. Looking for some feedback.

For the older girl I'm thinking maybe moving the camera down a but more would result in a better picture.

(https://www.flickr.com/gp/41178007@N08/0ph93W)

(https://www.flickr.com/gp/41178007@N08/a7hLXL)

(https://www.flickr.com/gp/41178007@N08/a7hLXL)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on September 08, 2015, 08:43:46 PM
Just some pics of food we made.

Would love some feedback.

All taken on a phone (g4), unedited besides for straightening.

TIA!

(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/09/08/be0c1fdf43309a3465d613ce47723ea9.jpg)

(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/09/08/a4993378a0a14d67f9891f083e392654.jpg)

(http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/09/08/0a37eacd337c82818752a2f70cb9ab84.jpg)

Link to full res: https://drive.google.com/folder/d/0B0DyOtkhB9nBaEJoRVlFY0VleHM (https://drive.google.com/folder/d/0B0DyOtkhB9nBaEJoRVlFY0VleHM)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: noturbizniss on September 11, 2015, 11:30:21 AM
Rainbow across NYC and stemming from world trade center yesterday
Source:
(http://cdn.abclocal.go.com/content/wabc/images/cms/977625_630x354.jpg)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yehoshua on September 11, 2015, 12:24:03 PM
Rainbow across NYC and stemming from world trade center yesterday
Source:
(http://cdn.abclocal.go.com/content/wabc/images/cms/977625_630x354.jpg)
That's a great angle!
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ushdadude on September 11, 2015, 01:56:15 PM
http://groupon.com/bwf/b297aae4-b092-405c-ab2e-ed5517d49961?utm_campaign=OfferReferral&utm_source=bwf_link&utm_medium=bwf

Photography for Beginners Masterclass - SkillSuccess for $5.

seems like a great deal. Just bought it.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yehoshua on September 11, 2015, 02:29:12 PM
http://groupon.com/bwf/b297aae4-b092-405c-ab2e-ed5517d49961?utm_campaign=OfferReferral&utm_source=bwf_link&utm_medium=bwf

Photography for Beginners Masterclass - SkillSuccess for $5.

seems like a great deal. Just bought it.
For $5, even if it's not it's not much to lose.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: ushdadude on September 12, 2015, 09:43:15 PM
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on September 16, 2015, 04:31:37 PM
I have a batch of photos in Lightroom and I am not sure which location on my computer or hard drive is hosting the originals. They are not currently missing as I am able to see and edit them properly in LR I just can't figure out where they are being held. How can I determine that?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on September 16, 2015, 04:36:03 PM
I have a batch of photos in Lightroom and I am not sure which location on my computer or hard drive is hosting the originals. They are not currently missing as I am able to see and edit them properly in LR I just can't figure out where they are being held. How can I determine that?
For one thing you can hover your mouse over the folder in the folder pane in library view
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on September 16, 2015, 04:46:53 PM
For one thing you can hover your mouse over the folder in the folder pane in library view

Also right click > show in Explorer and it'll open the folder for you.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Fan of Dan on September 16, 2015, 05:20:33 PM
For one thing you can hover your mouse over the folder in the folder pane in library view
Also right click > show in Explorer and it'll open the folder for you.
Thank you! Both excellent tips. The first tip is a great way to keep organized when viewing a lot of photos and matching them up with folders. The explore method is just perfect for quickly finding the location of my photos. Problem solved and the folder was located so thank you very much.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: bsimchatomid on September 16, 2015, 05:24:22 PM
Who does the best photo developing? I have a Sony Next and the pictures look way better on screen than in print.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on September 17, 2015, 09:12:44 PM
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/the-muse-see-visual-guide-to-photography-settings/
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on September 17, 2015, 09:24:33 PM
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/the-muse-see-visual-guide-to-photography-settings/
Nice. All covered in great depth in SF's lessons but has the added visuals, which are a plus.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on September 17, 2015, 09:30:11 PM
Nice. All covered in great depth in SF's lessons but has the added visuals, which are a plus.
Yup. It's a pretty good "cheat sheet"
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: csl1 on September 26, 2015, 11:57:05 PM
I'm looking for suggestions on purchasing/renting a lens for photographing the Swiss mountains. I already own the canon 18-135, 50 1.8 and Tamron 28-75.  I appreciate your responses.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on September 30, 2015, 01:12:21 AM
I'm looking for suggestions on purchasing/renting a lens for photographing the Swiss mountains. I already own the canon 18-135, 50 1.8 and Tamron 28-75.  I appreciate your responses.
I was there 2 month ago used a 12-24mm got some nice shots.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on September 30, 2015, 01:23:58 AM
I will be up early tomorrow and will try to shoot a nice sunrise shot. (I have a beautiful view here) so to confirm,  in order to get a nice shot so the entire sky should be nice and colorful I should lower all three?
Title: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Chdayshc on September 30, 2015, 02:39:48 AM
Sorry everyone if I'm posting in the wrong thread. I'm wondering if any professional photographer(s) can chime in on which websites are the best to print from. I'm looking for professional quality Not shutterfly, snapfish ect... Thank you all
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on September 30, 2015, 08:16:30 AM
Sorry everyone if I'm posting in the wrong thread. I'm wondering if any professional photographer(s) can chime in on which websites are the best to print from. I'm looking for professional quality Not shutterfly, snapfish ect... Thank you all
I'm not a pro but IMO adarama pics
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yikes2179 on September 30, 2015, 09:04:18 AM
I'm not a pro but IMO adarama pics
I am & I highly recommend adoramapix as well - I have done side by side comparison with snapfish & shutterfly and almost anyone can see the difference
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Chdayshc on September 30, 2015, 10:32:56 AM
It looks like this place is Jewish ;) are you he owner?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on September 30, 2015, 10:05:24 PM
It looks like this place is Jewish ;) are you he owner?
It is Jewish owned and it is top quality. BTW if you tried snapfish and shutterfly, york etc. You may as well try artscow.com they are good for regular prints (it is a Chinese company)
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Yikes2179 on September 30, 2015, 11:03:04 PM
Nope not the owner 😀- i don't even really use them much anymore - i have one of the canon pixma pro 100 printers which I use
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: otr114 on October 02, 2015, 02:42:48 PM
I recently bought the sony nex 5tl. I basically use it to take pics of my kids. The kit lens doesn't seem to get a great bokeh effect. Any recommendations of a reasonably priced lens that would be good for portraits?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Iz on October 12, 2015, 07:31:57 PM
I have a Rebel T1i. Lately the colors in the pictures are a little washed out. How can I correct this?  I have this problem outdoors. Thanks.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on October 12, 2015, 11:11:30 PM
I have a Rebel T1i. Lately the colors in the pictures are a little washed out. How can I correct this?  I have this problem outdoors. Thanks.
Tried changing lenses? A clean up on the lens and on the camera by the lens mount might do the job.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 12, 2015, 11:20:07 PM
Also see if your exposure compensation is set to a positive value. Very low positive settings will result in washed out colors, but not necessarily overexposure.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Iz on October 12, 2015, 11:37:30 PM
Tried changing lenses? A clean up on the lens and on the camera by the lens mount might do the job.
Thank you for answering my question. I never took off my lens. Would it still make sense that this could be the cause?  What is the camera mount and how do I clean it? And how do I clean the lens?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Iz on October 12, 2015, 11:43:28 PM
Also see if your exposure compensation is set to a positive value. Very low positive settings will result in washed out colors, but not necessarily overexposure.
Thank you for answering my question. The exposure is set to the middle option. I tried making it darker. The colors looked warmer, more yellowy.  Any other suggestions?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on October 13, 2015, 01:27:23 PM
Thank you for answering my question. I never took off my lens. Would it still make sense that this could be the cause?  What is the camera mount and how do I clean it? And how do I clean the lens?
I am not a pro, Something Fishy knows much more than me, but here is my 2 cents

It does make sense that you have to clean it. You would do so with a clean cloth and a drop of alcohol (when using alcohol the lens or the camera should be facing down so the liquid should not drip into the lens or camera). You can search up-head about cleaning the lens it was mentioned several times i think.

https://www.google.com/search?q=camera+mount&oq=camera+mount&aqs=chrome..69i57.3375j0j1&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#safe=strict&q=lens+mount
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Iz on October 13, 2015, 03:22:22 PM
I am not a pro, Something Fishy knows much more than me, but here is my 2 cents

It does make sense that you have to clean it. You would do so with a clean cloth and a drop of alcohol (when using alcohol the lens or the camera should be facing down so the liquid should not drip into the lens or camera). You can search up-head about cleaning the lens it was mentioned several times i think.

https://www.google.com/search?q=camera+mount&oq=camera+mount&aqs=chrome..69i57.3375j0j1&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8#safe=strict&q=lens+mount
Thanks. I'll try it later.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: srap on October 19, 2015, 02:30:02 PM
Has the issue of photo paper been discussed anywhere?

High gloss, glossy, semi-gloss, luster, matte; pro vs. regular

Which do I buy? Pros and Cons
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: etech0 on October 19, 2015, 02:56:13 PM
Has the issue of photo paper been discussed anywhere?

High gloss, glossy, semi-gloss, luster, matte; pro vs. regular

Which do I buy? Pros and Cons
glossy pictures often have a glare
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: VacationLover on October 19, 2015, 05:52:19 PM
Has the issue of photo paper been discussed anywhere?

High gloss, glossy, semi-gloss, luster, matte; pro vs. regular

Which do I buy? Pros and Cons
For regular prints (ie 4x6, 5x7) you'd be best off with Matte, for photo albums you'd probably want luster (or semi glossy). Never use high gloss for photo prints.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Mordyk on October 26, 2015, 11:09:16 PM
i got from my photographer high resolution pics. where can i print enlargments and canvas the best quality?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: PBaruch on October 29, 2015, 09:08:39 PM
To anyone who was thinking about buying a Really Right Stuff tripod or ballhead, now might be a good time to do so.  They are celebrating their 25th anniversary and are offering some free items along with a purchase such as a tripod bag, etc.

http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/25-anniversary
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on October 29, 2015, 09:18:20 PM
To anyone who was thinking about buying a Really Right Stuff tripod or ballhead, now might be a good time to do so.  They are celebrating their 25th anniversary and are offering some free items along with a purchase such as a tripod bag, etc.

http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/25-anniversary
Have anything to say about this company? Do they make the products themselves or they're just sellers? What kinda company is this?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on October 29, 2015, 09:31:56 PM
They also have a "which tripod is best for me guide (http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/Which-Tripod-Is-Right-For-Me?)" and more useful guides (http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/Learn).
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: PBaruch on October 29, 2015, 09:42:39 PM
Have anything to say about this company? Do they make the products themselves or they're just sellers? What kinda company is this?

They are well recognized as one of the premier manufacturers of tripods and ballheads.  All tripods and ballheads are manufactured by the company in the USA.  I exclusively use their products.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on October 29, 2015, 09:47:01 PM
They are well recognized as one of the premier manufacturers of tripods and ballheads.  All tripods and ballheads are manufactured by the company in the USA.  I exclusively use their products.
Thanks. Very pricey company.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 30, 2015, 12:58:32 AM
Thanks. Very pricey company.

...and worth every penny.

I've been dying for a tripod and head from them for years. If anyone is looking to get me a gift, hint hint ;D.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Work-for-ur-muny on October 30, 2015, 01:03:39 AM
...and worth every penny.

I've been dying for a tripod and head from them for years. If anyone is looking to get me a gift, hint hint ;D.
I'm no expert in photography, but in the $800-$1100 range is it really worthwhile?!

...and yes, I get the hint and wish my budget would allow me for it...  :)

BTW Some of the folks on stage at last night's GOP debate sounded like the can (read fanatically) have every US citizen balance such a budget.  :D
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 30, 2015, 01:12:33 AM
I'm no expert in photography, but in the $800-$1100 range is it really worthwhile?!

For most people, not. For a pro who'd use it often, absolutely yes.

Personally I can't justify spending such an amount, but gosh do I want one.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Chdayshc on October 30, 2015, 04:22:22 PM

It is Jewish owned and it is top quality. BTW if you tried snapfish and shutterfly, york etc. You may as well try artscow.com they are good for regular prints (it is a Chinese company)

Thanks for your advice, got my album and it's beautiful. Appreciate your help
Title: photographing stars
Post by: csl1 on October 31, 2015, 07:07:39 PM
a gut voch, thank you for a wonderful informative learning thread.   i'm experimenting with my Rebel T2i DSLR to take pictures of the stars surrounding the mountains at night.  I did some research on night photography and set my camera to the following settings: F2.8, high ISO, and using the 500 rule, using a 10 second exposure, manual focus ,tripod, remote trigger.    While i did get some nice photographs with the mountain and stars reasonably in focus, other pictures come out completely blurry.  i also tried star trails but those are completely blurred.   I do not know how to focus on the stars. I've also watched a few tutorials as well as read some online articles, and they all say to put the focus ring on infinity, and focus on the brightest star.     If there is a way to help me, i appreciate it.   thanks
 
Title: Re: photographing stars
Post by: Zalc on October 31, 2015, 07:36:25 PM
While i did get some nice photographs with the mountain and stars reasonably in focus, other pictures come out completely blurry.  i also tried star trails but those are completely blurred.
While don't think I will be able to help you, other who may will probably find it much easier to help if you post some pics showing the issues.

A picture is worth 1000 words...
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: csl1 on October 31, 2015, 07:39:50 PM
thanks for your reply. i am unable to post any photos from here as i cannot upload the images to my computer.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Something Fishy on October 31, 2015, 08:05:13 PM
1. 10 seconds is awfully short. What lens are you using?
2. Focus by trial and error. Take a shot, see if it's in focus or not, move the focus a hair. If it's more in focus, continue moving the ring in that direction until you get the sharpest stars. If it's worse, move the ring in the opposite direction.
3. You need to be clearer about the blur. Is it fuzzy all around (out of focus), is everything smeared in the same general direction (camera movement), or is everything sharp but the stars are lines instead of points (too long a shutter speed).
4. After all is said and done, the T2i is absolutely not an ideal camera for the job. You can't expect incredible star pictures out of it, unfortunately.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: csl1 on October 31, 2015, 08:18:38 PM
Thanks for your quick reply.  I am using the Tamron 28-75, f2.8..
i calculated the 10 second exposure based on the 500 rule i read up about before leaving.   I also increased the ISO to 3200 as well as increasing exposure to 30 seconds.  It's hard to focus on the stars when the LCD screen is practically black.  Yet, when i do see a pinpoint of a star, i try to focus on it.  You ask about the blur- there is no camera movement whatsoever since it's mounted on a tripod and i'm using a remote. I believe the stars are out of focus. I'd love to upload an image for you to analyze; however, that is not possible now. 

I'll try sunrise in about 4 hours, and hope to IYH be more successful with that.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on October 31, 2015, 10:56:51 PM
It's hard to focus on the stars when the LCD screen is practically black.  Yet, when i do see a pinpoint of a star, i try to focus on it.  You ask about the blur- there is no camera movement whatsoever since it's mounted on a tripod and i'm using a remote. I believe the stars are out of focus.

You can try get it in focus by zooming in to each picture in camera after taking it, comparing results and slowly adjusting to get to the sharpest focus.
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: shlonx on November 10, 2015, 03:05:55 PM
Are there any disadvantages to constantly shooting with High Dynamic Range?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: Zalc on November 10, 2015, 03:31:15 PM
Are there any disadvantages to constantly shooting with High Dynamic Range?
What kind of camera?

What kind of HDR? In-camera or manually merging different exposures?
Title: Re: Learn Photography Master Thread
Post by: whYME on November 10, 2015, 04:20:09 PM
Are there any disadvantages to constantly shooting with High