Author Topic: Pesach Torah  (Read 3678 times)

Offline Yonah

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Re: Pesach Torah
« Reply #30 on: April 16, 2019, 12:46:14 PM »
I don't think there's any etymological relationship between חית and חטא.

I would agree with you there - same with the letter hay - the only connection to g-dliness is that we use it to abbreviate the word Hashem - which isn't a divine name in and of itself either. The idea was that it was a cute Homophonic addition to the difference between the Hay and the Chet.

Offline good sam

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Re: Pesach Torah
« Reply #31 on: April 16, 2019, 10:52:53 PM »
Not eating gebraktz is a מנהג עפ"י סוד. This is from the Kotzker.
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Offline good sam

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Re: Pesach Torah
« Reply #32 on: April 05, 2020, 12:28:12 AM »
A thought I had, let me know what you think:

On the oft-discussed question of why the haggada says that would Hashem not have redeemed us from Egypt, we would still today be slaves to Paraoh, when one could assume that after all these years surely the Jews would not still be slaves in Egypt, I thought that maybe we are not understanding the baal hahaggada correctly.

The story of the bondage of the Jews in Egypt is merely the beginning of the story of the Jewish people that continues to this day. A fledgling people bound together by heritage and shared experiences is solidified and given credence as a nation when Hashem redeems them, reveals himself to them, and gives them the gift of the Torah as their moral guide and Israel as a national homeland.

Now, what have become of the embryonic nation in Egypt had they not been redeemed by Hashem? Sure, they would have been freed from slavery eventually, perhaps given the rights of full Egyptian citizens, or perhaps sent as refugees to foreign lands. In either event, their cohesion as a discrete nation would have been lost.

And while it's true that the descendants of the Jewish slaves would not be slaves today, they would not be Jews today either. The destiny of the Jewish nation would have been fatally interrupted. The Jewish story would have ended with their enslavement in Egypt.

So when the haggada says that we would still be slaves today, it's not we, the individuals, who would be slaves to Paraoh, but the Jewish story which would *until today* be of a people who were enslaved to Paroah.

The proclamation in the haggada then is more than one of gratitude for redeeming us; it's a recognition that we owe our entire existence as Jews to our redemption from Egypt! With such a perspective, we shouldn't find it difficult to give thanks to Hashem for taking the Jews out of Egypt, even to extent of considering ourself among the redeemed.
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Offline good sam

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Re: Pesach Torah
« Reply #33 on: April 05, 2020, 01:25:17 AM »
TL; DR version:
If Hashem had not taken us out Egypt, then, even today, the Jewish People would be nothing more than a historical account of slaves to Paraoh in Egypt.
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