Topic Wiki

This is not a Hall of Shame thread.  Please do not copy posts with people's names.

This is a condensed thread to teach specific lessons to those who want to learn correct grammar and spelling.
We have many members whose mother tongue is not English.

Please title your post if you choose to add a lesson.  A font size of 12 pt in capitals will make that post easy to find.  The lesson posts will also be referenced in the wiki.

LESSONS

1.  there / their / they're
2.  a vs. an
3.  went vs. have gone
4. It's vs. Its
5. Affect vs. Effect
6.  Capital vs Capitol

  • Commas go before the space, like this, not like ,this.
  • Commas/periods go after the close parenthesis (like this), not before (like this.)   (Unless the entire sentence is enclosed.)

« Last edited by SSLPhD on January 18, 2018, 10:45:12 PM »

Author Topic: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101  (Read 6363 times)

Offline ExGingi

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Nov 2015
  • Posts: 4032
  • Total likes: 443
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 5
    • View Profile
  • Location: 770
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #105 on: December 06, 2017, 07:48:14 AM »
letter sounds something like le-uh
And Manhattan sound like "Man-ha-un"?
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

Offline etech0

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *********
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 9024
  • Total likes: 224
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 1
    • View Profile
  • Location: not lakewood
  • Programs: DDF
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #106 on: December 06, 2017, 08:35:34 AM »
Brits pronounce their 'T's.  Americans have a rule that changes some 'T's into 'D's:
 
[t]-->[d]/ vowel __ unaccented vowel (where '__' means the context)

letter
later
batting
riveting

but not before an accented vowel:
attention
competition


What do you mean silent?  Examples?
"whatever"
Workflowy. You won't know what you're missing until you try it.

Offline Work-for-ur-muny

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Dec 2014
  • Posts: 3101
  • Total likes: 304
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 34
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #107 on: December 06, 2017, 03:41:14 PM »
And Manhattan sound like "Man-ha-un"?
More like "Man-ha-in"

Offline srap

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 2360
  • Total likes: 36
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 2
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #108 on: December 06, 2017, 06:14:07 PM »
letter sounds something like le-uh
Ah.  You're all talking about the Cockney accent.  This started as a geographical accent, but has become more widespread in different parts of London.  An American using that type of speech would qualify for speech therapy, but theirs is a standard accent so it is acceptable.

They have 'f' for 'th', 'v' for 'TH', 'w' for 'l' ('towow' for towel), drop their final 'g's in 'ing' endings (readin'), drop their initial 'h's (orse), drop their final 'r's, AND drop their 't' and 'k's in the middle of words (Mana-an, wha-evuh for whatever, le-uh for letter). 

They also use what we would call grammatical errors, BUT they have a really cool rhyme based slang.

« Last Edit: December 06, 2017, 06:17:16 PM by srap »

Offline shlonx

  • Dansdeals Gold Elite
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2015
  • Posts: 180
  • Total likes: 26
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 0
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #109 on: December 06, 2017, 07:02:31 PM »


They also use what we would call grammatical errors, BUT they have a really cool rhyme based slang.



Such as "trouble and strife" for "wife".

@srap Are you an English teachah or sumfin'?
Brevity may be the soul of wit, but floridity is its spirit.

Offline srap

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 2360
  • Total likes: 36
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 2
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #110 on: December 06, 2017, 08:24:10 PM »
Such as "trouble and strife" for "wife".

@srap Are you an English teachah or sumfin'?
Hey--you're pretty good at it!  I just love info and details. 

It gets challenging for outsiders when they decide to have fun.  The real slangy Cockney slang only uses the first word of the pair. 
Take a sherbet down the frog with your dustbin skin wearing her new syrup on her loaf, along with your cows, to the light.

(Ex.  Since 'frog and toad' mean 'road', you have to understand that in witty Cockney slang, 'frog' means 'road'!)

Here is one in regular Cockney:  Some lump of ice: Don't be a lump of school and tumble down the sink any satin and silk as you go up the apples and pears to get the basin of gravy. 
Anyone want to guess at this without looking up the answer?

Offline good sam

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Jun 2011
  • Posts: 2413
  • Total likes: 120
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 10
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #111 on: December 07, 2017, 10:26:25 AM »
Recognizing reality helps keep the expectations of both sides realistic. A false illusion that Jerusalem as the capitol is negotiable doesn't.
Capital and Capitol. Know the difference.
If you don't care why would you comment?
HT: DMYD

Offline srap

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 2360
  • Total likes: 36
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 2
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #112 on: December 07, 2017, 10:58:39 AM »
Capital and Capitol. Know the difference.
Next lesson, thank you.

CAPITAL vs CAPITOL

Hint:  Always spell capitAl unless you are talking about a building, then capitOl.

Capital:  a city, a letter of the alphabet, wealth
Capitol:  a building (in which a state legislature meets)
« Last Edit: December 07, 2017, 11:09:18 AM by srap »

Offline shlonx

  • Dansdeals Gold Elite
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2015
  • Posts: 180
  • Total likes: 26
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 0
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #113 on: December 07, 2017, 12:09:31 PM »
Hey--you're pretty good at it!  I just love info and details. 

It gets challenging for outsiders when they decide to have fun.  The real slangy Cockney slang only uses the first word of the pair. 
Take a sherbet down the frog with your dustbin skin wearing her new syrup on her loaf, along with your cows, to the light.

(Ex.  Since 'frog and toad' mean 'road', you have to understand that in witty Cockney slang, 'frog' means 'road'!)

Here is one in regular Cockney:  Some lump of ice: Don't be a lump of school and tumble down the sink any satin and silk as you go up the apples and pears to get the basin of gravy. 
Anyone want to guess at this without looking up the answer?

Coming from London, I'd venture to say that there aren't too many people under 45 who still speak real Cockney. The Cockney accent? Definitely. Think of Jason Statham. But the rhyming part? Not really.
Brevity may be the soul of wit, but floridity is its spirit.

Offline shlonx

  • Dansdeals Gold Elite
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2015
  • Posts: 180
  • Total likes: 26
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 0
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #114 on: December 07, 2017, 09:04:40 PM »
Some lump of ice: Don't be a lump of school and tumble down the sink any satin and silk as you go up the apples and pears to get the basin of gravy. 
Anyone want to guess at this without looking up the answer?

A piece of advice: Don't be a fool and spill the milk as you go up the stairs to get the bowl of cereal?
Brevity may be the soul of wit, but floridity is its spirit.

Offline srap

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 2360
  • Total likes: 36
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 2
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #115 on: December 07, 2017, 10:04:00 PM »
...Here is one in regular Cockney: 
Some lump of ice: Don't be a lump of school and tumble down the sink any satin and silk as you go up the apples and pears to get the basin of gravy. 

Anyone want to guess at this without looking up the answer?

A piece of advice: Don't be a fool and spill the milk as you go up the stairs to get the bowl of cereal?
Real close!

Some advice: Don't be a fool and drink any milk as you go up the stairs to get the _____.    (last phrase is their slang, but misarticulated!)

Offline shlonx

  • Dansdeals Gold Elite
  • ***
  • Join Date: May 2015
  • Posts: 180
  • Total likes: 26
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 0
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #116 on: December 24, 2017, 08:55:43 PM »

Brevity may be the soul of wit, but floridity is its spirit.

Offline Work-for-ur-muny

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Dec 2014
  • Posts: 3101
  • Total likes: 304
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 34
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #117 on: December 24, 2017, 09:04:15 PM »
Close. The "but" should be removed, and it's spot-on!  :)

Offline Yehuda57

  • Dansdeals Platinum Elite + Lifetime Gold Elite
  • ******
  • Join Date: Jan 2014
  • Posts: 967
  • Total likes: 438
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 5
    • View Profile
  • Location: Brooklyn
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #118 on: December 24, 2017, 10:17:10 PM »
Close. The "but" should be removed, and it's spot-on!  :)
Close. The "hard" should be replaced with difficult for it to be spot-on. :)
Quote from: ExGingi
[Stating things eloquently] seems to be Yehuda57's job around here :)

Offline srap

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 2360
  • Total likes: 36
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 2
    • View Profile
Re: Grammar and Spelling Lessons 101
« Reply #119 on: December 24, 2017, 11:41:38 PM »
+1  No 'but', 'difficult' is better.