Topic Wiki

When I work in the garage, I keep all the doors open. Is that okay? No. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) ran a 5.5 horsepower gasoline-powered pressure washer in a double garage with both doors open, the window open, and a vent open. In only 12 minutes CO concentrations in the garage rose to 658 parts per million (ppm). The rate of emission from a typical gasoline engine is so large (30,000 to 100,000 ppm) that it is very difficult to provide sufficient ventilation. NIOSH warns, “Do not use equipment and tools powered by gasoline engines inside buildings…”

Do large buildings dilute carbon monoxide enough to eliminate the risk of CO poisoning? No. NIOSH investigated a case where a worker in a 48 x 88 x 14 foot room was poisoned by carbon monoxide. He was using an 8-horsepower pump and had fresh air entering the room through the forced-air heating system. Ten minutes after the pump engine was started. CO concentrations as high as 395 ppm were measured. In an Iowa case, an entire six- story hotel was filled with carbon monoxide from a single malfunctioning water heater located in the basement. Concentrations were as high as 600 ppm in a sixth-story room, a potentially lethal level.
« Last edited by username on April 16, 2018, 05:05:50 PM »

Author Topic: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?  (Read 1722 times)

Online etech0

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *********
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 9032
  • Total likes: 226
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 1
    • View Profile
  • Location: not lakewood
  • Programs: DDF
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #30 on: April 16, 2018, 06:43:58 PM »
Was it in anything other than an apartment (or Garage)?

It seems that whenever I hear or read a story, it's invariably an apartment, as opposed to a large house.
My story was in a house. It may take longer until it's concentrated enough to cause a problem, but that doesn't mean it can't happen.
Workflowy. You won't know what you're missing until you try it.

Online ExGingi

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Nov 2015
  • Posts: 4062
  • Total likes: 446
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 5
    • View Profile
  • Location: 770
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #31 on: April 16, 2018, 06:44:54 PM »
My story was in a house
I hear you. I guess you are coming up with the answer I was looking for in my OP.

Care to share the story?
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

Online etech0

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *********
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 9032
  • Total likes: 226
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 1
    • View Profile
  • Location: not lakewood
  • Programs: DDF
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #32 on: April 16, 2018, 06:47:18 PM »
I hear you. I guess you are coming up with the answer I was looking for in my OP.

Care to share the story?
It was a few years ago. Detectors were beeping. We figured it's probably nothing, and opened some windows just in case. Detectors stopped, so we closed the windows. Then they started again after a while. I think this went on for a couple days, eventually we called someone to check it out. Turns out our oven was broken/malfunctioning, and leaking carbon dioxide (it needed to be replaced). Then we realized that a bunch of us had had headaches / fatigue for a few days already. The person said that the detectors saved our lives B"H.
Workflowy. You won't know what you're missing until you try it.

Online aygart

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *********
  • Join Date: May 2008
  • Posts: 6105
  • Total likes: 988
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 7
    • View Profile
    • Lower Watt Energy Brokers
  • Programs: www.lowerwatt.com
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #33 on: April 16, 2018, 07:08:27 PM »
There are many ways appliances can leak CO. A clogged dryer vent or blocked chimney can do it and they are not uncommon.
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.

Online ExGingi

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Nov 2015
  • Posts: 4062
  • Total likes: 446
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 5
    • View Profile
  • Location: 770
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #34 on: April 16, 2018, 07:20:32 PM »
So what's the consensus?

CO detector next to the dryer and next to the furnace? Kitchen?
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

Online TimT

  • Dansdeals Lifetime 10K Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 17270
  • Total likes: 529
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 3
    • View Profile
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2018, 07:24:34 PM »
So what's the consensus?

CO detector next to the dryer and next to the furnace? Kitchen?
Bedrooms. Kitchen is good to have as well. Ultra important where people sleep

Offline yesitsme

  • Dansdeals Platinum Elite + Lifetime Gold Elite
  • ******
  • Join Date: Dec 2014
  • Posts: 989
  • Total likes: 64
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 4
  • Gender: Male
    • View Profile
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2018, 07:44:12 PM »
Co is generated from combustible energy that doesn't burn well, in order for something to burn it needs oxygen, Fuel and heat. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_triangle
When the fire is lacking any of the three it will produce unburned gases known as co, IE when there isn't enough oxygen in the house usually not the case, or the vent of the stove is covered very common pesach, dryer vent clogged common if not cleaned, missing heat would be as mentioned before, you put something cold on stove but it doesn't take long for it to warm up so it's usually not a problem.

Another solution to minimize co is have a plant in your house since that's their food and release oxygen, problem is the faster the plant grows the more co it consumes, in order for the tree to make a signifcant difference you'd nedd a plant that grows very quick it will outgrow your house very quickly.

Online ExGingi

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Nov 2015
  • Posts: 4062
  • Total likes: 446
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 5
    • View Profile
  • Location: 770
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #37 on: April 16, 2018, 08:38:26 PM »
There are many ways appliances can leak CO. A clogged dryer vent or blocked chimney can do it and they are not uncommon.
A clogged dryer vent will result in extended drying times alerting users to the problem. Will a CO detector provide earlier detection?
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

Online aygart

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *********
  • Join Date: May 2008
  • Posts: 6105
  • Total likes: 988
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 7
    • View Profile
    • Lower Watt Energy Brokers
  • Programs: www.lowerwatt.com
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2018, 08:45:28 PM »
A clogged dryer vent will result in extended drying times alerting users to the problem. Will a CO detector provide earlier detection?
If it makes CO that comes into the house. It can happen that high efficiency boilers and water heaters get their vents clogged by leaves. There are many ways appliances can malfunction to create CO
You have the right to remain silent. Anything you say can and will be used to start a religious discussion.

Online TimT

  • Dansdeals Lifetime 10K Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 17270
  • Total likes: 529
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 3
    • View Profile
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #39 on: April 16, 2018, 08:47:26 PM »
A clogged dryer vent will result in extended drying times alerting users to the problem.
How so ?

Online ExGingi

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Nov 2015
  • Posts: 4062
  • Total likes: 446
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 5
    • View Profile
  • Location: 770
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #40 on: April 16, 2018, 08:56:38 PM »
How so ?
Key to dryer function is venting.

If vent is clogged, dryer will work much longer, and possibly not completely dry clothing.
I've been waiting over 5 years with bated breath for someone to say that!
-- Dan

Online TimT

  • Dansdeals Lifetime 10K Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *******
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 17270
  • Total likes: 529
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 3
    • View Profile
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #41 on: April 16, 2018, 08:58:53 PM »
Key to dryer function is venting.

If vent is clogged, dryer will work much longer, and possibly not completely dry clothing.
But if your distracted/busy you might not realize in time. The detector lets you know loud & clear.

Offline Yammer

  • Dansdeals Presidential Platinum Elite
  • ********
  • Join Date: Aug 2015
  • Posts: 2894
  • Total likes: 130
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 1
    • View Profile
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #42 on: April 16, 2018, 09:02:09 PM »


It was a few years ago. Detectors were beeping. We figured it's probably nothing, and opened some windows just in case. Detectors stopped, so we closed the windows. Then they started again after a while. I think this went on for a couple days, eventually we called someone to check it out. Turns out our oven was broken/malfunctioning, and leaking carbon dioxide (it needed to be replaced). Then we realized that a bunch of us had had headaches / fatigue for a few days already. The person said that the detectors saved our lives B"H.

Happy to hear that B"H everyone was ok. My old next door neighbor was having headaches all the as well and they found CM leaking from the boiler room. She would call down utility company all the time, and the landlord would yell at her for calling then down and called her delusional....

Online etech0

  • Dansdeals Lifetime Presidential Platinum Elite
  • *********
  • Join Date: Dec 2013
  • Posts: 9032
  • Total likes: 226
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 1
    • View Profile
  • Location: not lakewood
  • Programs: DDF
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #43 on: April 16, 2018, 09:33:13 PM »

Happy to hear that B"H everyone was ok. My old next door neighbor was having headaches all the as well and they found CM leaking from the boiler room. She would call down utility company all the time, and the landlord would yell at her for calling then down and called her delusional....
B"H... and wow!
Workflowy. You won't know what you're missing until you try it.

Offline snapit

  • Dansdeals Platinum Elite
  • ****
  • Join Date: Sep 2014
  • Posts: 402
  • Total likes: 1
  • DansDeals.com Hat Tips 4
    • View Profile
Re: Is a Carbon Monoxide detector necessary in a large home?
« Reply #44 on: April 16, 2018, 09:50:01 PM »
My aunt and uncle (in a large house) left some flames on the stove on over a yom tov and the family ended up in the hospital to be checked out due to carbon monoxide, bh the detectors where functional. I'm unsure what the exact details were.